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Local restaurants, shops emerge in Tampa airport's redevelopment

The next time you fly out of Tampa International Airport you may notice some new shops to peruse and restaurants to grab a bite or have a drink. As part of the airport’s $953-million master plan, there will be 65 new shops and restaurants opening at the airport.
 
The first two establishments are already open in Airside A: Bay Coffee & Tea and Auntie Anne’s Pretzels.
 
Bay Coffee & Tea is a locally-based organic coffee shop. This innovative company uses solar energy to dry their coffee beans. More local shops and restaurants will be represented in the airport as construction continues.
 
“Roughly 40-percent of the food and beverage options are local, featuring such staples as Columbia, Cigar City, RumFish Grill, Buddy Brew and the Café by Mise en Place,” says Danny Valentine with Tampa International Airport.
 
The 65 new shops and restaurants will be spread throughout the airport including the main terminal. Thirty of the storefronts and restaurants are set to open this year.
 
Other local brands to look for include:
  • Shop HSN where live remote shows will be broadcast from the store, and Tampa Life featuring gifts from the Dali Museum can be found in the Main Terminal.
  • Ducky’s, partially owned by Tampa Bay Rays player Evan Longoria, will be modeled after the South Tampa Sports Bar in Airside A. Like the South Tampa location known for its duck pin bowling, the airport restaurant will offer a table top version of the bowling game.
  • Fitlife Foods known for its convenient but healthy meals and Goody Goody burgers are being brought back to life after a 10-year-plus hiatus in Airside C.
  • Tampa Bay Times storefront with grab-and-go food by Alessi Bakery, Four Green Fields, which will be a replica of the Tampa bar and restaurant complete with a similar thatched roof and Air Essentials, a news and convenience store featuring food from La Segunda Bakery, CaterMeFit and Amici’s Catered Cuisine  in Airside E.
  • For those in need of some liquid courage before their flight, there is The Gasparilla Bar, a Captain Morgan bar in the shape of a pirate ship, and Bay to Bay News, a news and convenience store featuring food from La Segunda Bakery, CaterMeFit and Amici’s Catered Cuisine in Airside F.
“Our redevelopment program will give our guests and passengers access to more choices than ever before,” Valentine says. “We are putting more options near gates where passengers want them most. Overall, we are enhancing passenger experience.”
 
Total construction is set to be completed by late 2017.

Construction begins on new apartment tower in downtown Tampa

The downtown Tampa skyline will be getting more crowded in coming months as yet another new apartment building grows out of the ground on north Franklin Street between Tyler and Cass streets.

With 362-units, the 23-story apartment building will also have 8,000-square-feet of retail space.

The building by developers Carter of Atlanta includes very dramatic public art, a generous amount of ground floor retail and a full amenity package including a rooftop pool,” says Bob McDonaugh, Economic Opportunity Administrator for the city of Tampa. “It all adds up to a very attractive development, which should be quite successful when it is completed.”

The design team includes DPR Construction and RJT+R Architecture.

The new tower is named Nine15 after its address at 915 Franklin N. St. It joins several other projects in the making including the Arts and Entertainment Residencies (AER) near the Straz Center and The Channel Club at the intersection of Meridian Avenue and East Twiggs Street.

“The city of Tampa is experiencing the same phenomenon that many other cities are experiencing, the flight back to the urban core,” McDonaugh says. “Today, many of the millennials as well as their empty nest parents are deciding that an urban lifestyle is what suits them.”

McDonaugh goes on to say that while there is very little vacancy available in many urban areas, the site for the new tower is where the former Grant Building sat mostly vacant for years, an interesting location because it is the furthest north of the current wave of residential development taking place in downtown Tampa.

Surge of multi-family residential development seen in South Tampa

Like many sections of Tampa, South Tampa is experiencing a surge of development as new townhouses and villas go up.  

Waverly Courtyard Villas
 
This new community is finishing up construction on its final two buildings, which are townhomes, situated at the corner of MacDill and Euclid Avenues. Each townhome has four bedrooms and four bathrooms, with more than 2,600 square-feet.
 
“The townhomes feature an open floor plan that is perfectly suited for entertaining,” says Bill Andrasco, who represents the construction company on the project, ODC Construction. “The custom kitchen is very stylish, with its maple cabinetry, granite counters and top-of-the-line appliances.”
 
Other amenities include energy efficient, impact-resistant windows, as well as a detached, private guest suites with full bath and kitchenette above a detached two-car garage.
 
“The South Tampa area is a bubbling and lively atmosphere,” Andrasco says. “Living in the area puts you walking distance from some of Tampa's best restaurants, wine shops, specialty stores and more.”
 
Construction on the mid-$500,000 priced townhouses will be completed May 2016.
 
Grant Place

Located near the intersection of Azeele Street and Armenia Avenue, Grant Place is under construction. This new development will feature triplex townhomes. Each townhouse will be three-bedrooms, two-and-a-half-bathrooms and will be approximately 2,200 square-feet.

Features of these low-to-mid $500,000 priced townhomes include a loft, Mediterranean-style design with tile roof and covered patio. The location of the community is within walking distance to several restaurants, Publix Greenwise and Starbucks.

Casa De Leon

Another of the more luxurious projects under construction in South Tampa is Casa De Leon, which will be located on West DeLeon Street. The development includes six luxury townhomes pre-selling in the low-to-mid $500,000s. These three-bedroom, three-and-a-half-bathroom homes have amenities such as a study and game room, optional elevator and second floor lanai.

The three-story home is also good for the environment with Energy Star windows, high efficiency heat pumps and electric heat strips with thermostats that can be programmed as well as a tankless water heater.

Construction on Casa De Leon is expected to be complete Fall 2016.

Tampa Bay area colleges add buildings designed for the future

As college students settle in for the Spring semester at campuses around the Tampa Bay area, many of the college grounds in the region are under construction to make way for the future.

USF St. Petersburg

The University of South Florida-St Petersburg (USFSP) recently broke ground on the Kate Tiedemann College of Business building. The building located on the downtown St. Petersburg campus will be designed to enhance the learning experience for business students.

“The new building will house an accelerator lab for its entrepreneurship program where students can develop startups and work with local entrepreneurs,” says Gary Patterson, interim Dean and Professor of Finance at the Kate Tiedemann College of Business. “We will also provide a consumer insight lab where marketing students can conduct focus group studies. The building offers USFSP the infrastructure needed to improve the services to our students and community partners.”

Patterson says the building, which will cost upwards of $29 million, will allow students the ability to congregate in one location.

“Currently the students, faculty and staff are spread across eight buildings at USF St. Petersburg,” he says. “Students will finally have a home, and the new building will allow them to work on group projects in the break-out rooms found throughout the building.” 

The Kate Tiedemann College of Business building is expected to open Fall 2016.

University of Tampa

To ensure not only a healthy mind, but healthy body too, the University of Tampa is building a new fitness center. Scheduled to open Spring 2016, the 40,000-square-feet, two-story building will have exercise programs, personal training and evaluation, intra-murals, club sports and a room dedicated for spinning classes.

In addition to the expenditure of the building, the University is purchasing a large number of treadmills, stationary bikes, elliptical trainers and free weights for the fitness center.

Eckerd College

Students interested in the arts rejoiced when the college recently announced plans to replace its Ransom Arts Center with a new visual arts building. The Ransom Arts Center, which has been a staple at the main campus since the 1970s, was torn down.

The new building has yet to be named, but will be approximately 34,000-square-feet, quite an upgrade from the original 18,000-square-feet. With the extra space, students can expect more video and photography space, a green screen and more space for a dark room.

Construction started last month and is expected to be completed in two years.

Tampa Bay area private schools grow, invest in new buildings

Tampa Bay area private schools serving students in kindergarten through high school are investing in their campuses as a way to enrich the educational experience for students.
 
Academy of the Holy Names
 
Located on Bayshore Boulevard in Tampa, The Academy of the Holy Names recently announced its groundbreaking on a new center for the arts. The $11 million facility will include a 350-seat theater, interior and exterior learning spaces, 2- and 3-D art labs as well as band, choral and dance classrooms.
 
“In addition to classes, the center will be used for full-run drama productions,” says Emily Wise of The Academy of the Holy Names.The arts are a central part of the Academy's curriculum and a critical factor in educating the whole child, mind, body and spirit.”  

Construction is expected to run approximately 13 months. While the center will be ready for use in spring 2017, classes will start in fall 2017.
 
Berkeley Prep
 
With a generous donation from the Gries Investment Fund to the tune of $4 million, last fall Berkeley Prep opened the Gries Center for Arts and Sciences. The 75,000-square-foot facility is home to the middle and upper division fine and visual arts departments, as well as upper division for math and science.
 
Other features of the center include multimedia labs, digital-ready study rooms, eight professional potter’s wheels, two outdoor kilns and a covered patio space.
 
One of the more innovative features of the building is the multimedia room, which includes a green screen, industry-editing software for film class and a whisper box that allows students to record voice-overs of sound studio quality for films and animation.
 
Jesuit High School
 
The historic all-male K-12 private school located on Himes Avenue in Tampa is planning a $35-million renovation and expansion project. Plans include adding four new buildings to the campus, as well as renovating others. Also, a full renovation of the chapel is planned.
 
“The refurbishment of the campus will begin with a full renovation of the chapel, which is the heart of the school,” says Pete Young of Jesuit High School. “The students gather every morning for Convocation, and we are maxed out on the number of students we can fit in the sanctuary, there is just no room for growth, so we need a larger chapel so we can accommodate more students.”

Memorial for veterans to open in Clearwater park

Driving down Gulf-to-Bay in Clearwater, you may have noticed fencing around Crest Lake Park. Wondering what is going on?
 
Well, the city of Clearwater, along with the Tampa Bay Veterans Alliance has decided to add a veteran’s memorial area to the park. Crest Lake Park was chosen given its visibility and access to Gulf-to-Bay.
 
Even though the memorial will be new, it already has historic significance.
 
“The Tampa Bay Veterans Alliance, established as Clearwater Veterans Alliance, developed the Florida Veterans’ Memorial concept to establish the first cross-generational veteran’s memorial in the State of Florida,” says Jason Beisel with the city of Clearwater.  “There exists no other memorial park or plaza that honors the commitments of veterans from so many eras, spanning World War II through present day.”
 
The estimated $1 million project will feature a brick circular plaza with a gold design in the middle along a paved pathway. An American flag displayed along with POW flags, as well as flags representing each branch of the United States military will be represented. Bronze sculptures representing periods of conflict from World War II to the present will be included. The plaza will be surrounded by walls on which those wanting to honor a veteran can have the veteran's name engraved for a small donation.  

“There is a longstanding tradition of honoring veterans in the United States of America,” Beisel says. “The Florida Veterans Memorial serves this tradition by continuing the city of Clearwater’s history of incorporating veteran’s memorials, started at the base of the Clearwater Memorial Causeway in the 1920s with the placement of E.M. Viquesney’s Spirit of the American Navy and Spirit of the American Doughboy into city infrastructure.”
 
There will be no fee to visit the memorial once it opens.  A portion of the memorial will open Memorial Day with a ribbon cutting.

Innovative aquaponics facility in Tampa Bay to grow produce, farm fish

Looking for a place where you could get fresh organic fish, as well as produce free of chemicals and fertilizers here in the Tampa Bay area? Now, what if these fish and produce would come from a building and not the ocean or farm land?
 
That is the innovative concept behind Global Aquaponic Inc. (GAI). It is a concept that the company wants to bring to the Tampa Bay area..

The specific location has not been yet determined.
 
If you have ever taken a ride through ‘The Land’ exhibit in EPCOT at the Walt Disney World resort, you may have seen how similar systems work. Basically, it is an alternative way to grow produce and farm fish in a controlled environment without the use of pesticides.
 
“Aquaponics uses up to 90 percent less water than traditional soil-based farming and therefore preserves our fresh water,” Bradshaw says. “Chemical pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers are poisonous to our environment; therefore we do not use any of those.”
 
Bradshaw goes on to say that although there is no start date as of yet, the facility can be completed and fully producing in one year from start to finish.  Which also means green job creation for the area.
 
“The aquaponics system will be comprised of two separate entities: a fish facility and a greenhouse,” he says. The fish facility will require two dedicated employees, a manager and an assistant manager, as well as one full-time employee. The greenhouse will require 12 to 24 full-time employees for the greenhouse bays.”
 
For more information on the company, visit their website.

Blocks of West Tampa experience investments, redevelopment

An abandoned shopping center in West Tampa is experiencing a rebirth as new retailers and a new restaurant make plans to call the neighborhood home. 

Ashley Furniture, Floor & Decor and Ker's Winghouse will all be going into a shopping center formerly anchored by K-Mart at  2915 North Dale Mabry Highway in Tampa.

“West Tampa is experiencing a renaissance,” says Dawn Hudson, president of the West Tampa Chamber of Commerce. “It is the perfect location for businesses to locate with easy access to all destinations, roadways and centers of influence around Tampa.”

Ashley Furniture and Floor & Decor are moving into the 60,000-plus square-feet space that K-Mart previously occupied. Ashley furniture, which has showrooms selling furniture for living rooms, bedrooms, dining rooms and home offices, will be occupying over 43,000-square-feet of adjacent storefront. Floor & Decor sells a variety of tile, stone, wood and laminate options for floors and walls.

Outside of the stores where Miami Subs once stood, a two-story Ker's Winghouse will be opening.

This 6,000-square-foot location has an unusually large layout compared to other Ker's locations throughout the Tampa Bay area.

The West Tampa area will continue to see more redevelopment as the city of Tampa's community redevelopment plan (CRP) progresses. Initiatives in the plan include improvements to sidewalks and roadways to make the neighborhood more walkable, redeveloping parks and restoring historic sites.

“Our iconic watertower will be illuminated soon,” Hudson says. “The renaissance is happening.”
 

Popular Chicago-based restaurant coming to Brandon

Tampa Bay area visitors and residents will be able to get a taste of Chicago while still soaking up the Florida sun when Portillo’s opens this spring in Brandon.
 
The Chicago-based restaurant chain plans to open its new location in the growing suburb east of Tampa, which is the first site in Florida for the chain.
 
“Tampans have been peppering us for years with requests to come to Florida,” says Nick Scarpino, Director of Marketing for Portillo’s. “There are also a lot of former Chicagoans in the greater Tampa area who are already familiar with our brand. We found a great opportunity just outside of Tampa and we're excited to open our doors soon.”
 
Portillo’s has 39 restaurants, most of which are in the Chicago area. Other locations can be found in Arizona and California.
 
The new restaurant located at the northwest corner of State Road 60 and Lakewood Drive will be 9,000-square-feet. There will be outdoor seating, as well as a 1930’s prohibition theme complete with a 1930’s truck suspended above the dining room.
 
Aside from the unique décor, Scarpino says it is the food that really draws people in.
 
“We are best known for our Chicago-style hot dogs and our Italian beef sandwiches,” he says. “Of course, no meal is complete at Portillo's without our famous chocolate cake, which is made fresh every day inside the restaurant.”
 
Up to 200 jobs will be created as a result of the new restaurant, which is currently taking applications. The grand opening is scheduled for late March or early April.
 
For more information on Portillo’s visit their website

Tech company in Tampa invests $1M in expansion, 45 new jobs

As the growing list of tech companies based in the Tampa Bay area gets longer, one company that has called Tampa home for over a decade has big plans for its future. SunView Software, Inc., founded in 2003, is investing $1-million into expanding its headquarters located at 10210 Highland Manor Drive in Tampa.
 
“We are adding 6,000-square-feet of office space to the existing headquarters in the Highland Oaks office complex,” says John Prestridge, VP of marketing and products for SunView Software, Inc. “We are building out a modern workspace for the expansion designed to enhance collaboration and teamwork for the expanding SunView team.”
 
He goes on to say that higher sales and continued product innovation have contributed to the robust growth and need for more space. With the extra space, Prestridge says, the company plans on hiring 45 new employees. Positions include software development, services, support, marketing and sales.
 
The company received help from the Tampa Hillsborough Economic Development Corporation in expediting the permitting process to get the expansion plans on the fast track.
 
“Hillsborough County’s burgeoning information technology industry is a major point of pride for this community,” says Lesley “Les” Miller, chairman of the Hillsborough County Board of County Commissioners in a news release. “Our formidable group of technology entrepreneurs, increasing numbers of highly skilled IT talent, and excellent business climate and quality of life are all helping to position us as one of the most desirable tech destinations in the country.”
 
Sunview Software joins several other technology companies that are also expanding their Tampa Bay headquarters including, Accusoft, BlueGrace Logistics, Connectwise, Hivelocity, ReliaQuest and Tribridge.

Downtown St. Petersburg residential boom continues

The residential real estate boom in downtown St. Petersburg is going strong as two new buildings get ready to rise along the ever growing skyline.

This month the NRP Group, which built Beacon 430 on Third Avenue, started construction on a nine-story residential building. Situated across the street from the Tampa Bay Times building, the new structure will have an internal parking garage for residents and 200 spots for Tampa Bay Times employees.  

“This will be a luxury residential building with 366 units,” says Kurt Kehoe, VP of the NRP Group, LLC.

Kehoe says the building, which has yet to be named, will have studios, one-, two- and three-bedroom units. The units range from 570 square feet to over 1,550 square feet.

“There is very little property that can be developed in the business district of St. Petersburg, but we wanted to move on this as soon as possible,” he says. There is a lot of interest in downtown with the walkability so it made a lot of sense to move on this property when we did.”

 The building will have a rooftop pool with views facing East toward Tampa Bay, as well as a rooftop fitness area and club room adjacent to the pool.

“We did a secondary pool in the courtyard that will be ground level that will have large sitting areas, a lounge and another club area.”

Construction is expected to be completed in early 2018.

A few blocks away from the NRP project, another building is under construction, which is expected to be completed this year.

AER St. Petersburg is a luxury apartment tower with 18 stories and 358-units. The $85-million project features 600-square-foot studios to 1,500-square-foot three-bedroom units.

Amenities at AER include interactive audio visual and social media venues, fitness center, business center, pool, clubroom with exhibition kitchen, observation deck and on-site parking garage.

New restaurant, new homes help revitalize Sulphur Springs neighborhood in Tampa

A struggling neighborhood in Tampa sees a brighter future with city and private investments, including the opening of a new healthy food restaurant.

“The city of Tampa has undertaken several steps to improve the Sulphur Springs neighborhood,” says Bob McDonaugh, Economic Opportunity Administrator for the city of Tampa. “Sulphur Springs was a neighborhood particularly hard hit during the real estate crisis and had a large number of foreclosures which contributed to blight in the neighborhood. The city of Tampa is determined to assist this neighborhood to get back on its feet.”

Keith and Vanessa Malson also see the potential in the neighborhood, which is why a few months ago they opened the Sulphur Springs Sandwich Shop.

“We love the Sulphur Springs area. Its where we live and we wanted to bring some positive energy to the neighborhood,” Vanessa Malson says. “Currently there are mostly fast-food restaurants here, so we wanted to offer an alternate that is reasonable priced but also offers healthier options.”

The new restaurant features all homemade food, made from scratch daily.  
 
“We don't necessarily believe that food has to be expensive or organic to be good for you, we believe it just needs to be homemade,” she says.

This is the first restaurant the couple has opened. Between the two of them, they have 25 years of restaurant experience. With 800-square-feet of space in their new establishment, the duo serves lunch Monday through Saturday, and also takes carry-out orders.

In an effort to bring more businesses and residents to the Sulphur Springs neighborhood, the city has demolished abandoned homes, focused more attention on enforcement of rules regulating maintenance and upkeep of properties and trimmed back trees that were interfering with the effectiveness of street lights.
 
“As part of the citywide 'Bright Lights Safe Nights' initiative, the city, working with Tampa Electric, added 400 streetlights to the neighborhood,” McDonaugh says. “Studies show that increased illumination in neighborhoods lowers crime rates. In conjunction with efforts by the Tampa police department, Sulphur Springs has experienced a 20 percent reduction in crime.” 
 
McDonaugh goes on to say, that the vacant homes that were demolished by the city are in the process of being replaced by new homes.

“Home ownership tends to stabilize neighborhoods and to date, the city has invested $1.4-million building new homes in Sulphur Springs,'' says McDonaugh. "This will not be a short-term effort, but the city will continue its efforts to assist this historic neighborhood.”

Sarasota's historic DeMarcay to reopen as luxury condo tower

New life is coming to the historic DeMarcay Hotel in downtown Sarasota, which is currently under construction and will reopen as an 18-story luxury condo tower.
 
The 39-unit tower will have many amenities including a rooftop pool, outdoor kitchen, club room and fitness center high above the city on the 18th floor.
 
“No other condominium in downtown has an amenities level at the top of its building,” says Perry Corneau, New Development Manager with Sotheby’s International Realty, which is handling sales for the tower. “The building will also have valet service and an elevator system to bring the residents' cars to the parking levels on the second through sixth floors.”
 
Corneau goes on to say that the façade of the original historic building will be incorporated into the new structure.
 
Unit sizes at DeMarcay at 33 South Palm range from 1,100-square-feet to over 3,000-square-feet and each unit has a balcony with a gas grill. Prices range from $600,000 to over $3.1 million per unit.
 
While construction has yet to start, units have already been sold.
 
“To date 13 of the 39 units have been reserved,” Corneau says. “Total sellout of the 39 units is expected to be in excess of $50 million.”
 
Construction is expected to be completed by spring of 2017.

Downtown Clearwater: development brings residential, restaurants, retail

Walk the streets of downtown Clearwater and you will see cranes in the air, traffic cones lining the streets and the feeling that a lot of change is coming to the neighborhood.
 
“The city and the community redevelopment agency’s (CRA) redevelopment strategy emphasizes the creation of a significant residential concentration in and around the downtown core to create and support a retail and recreation destination environment,” says Geraldine Lopez, Director of Economic Development and Housing for the city of Clearwater.
 
According to Lopez, there are currently two residential projects in the works. The Nolen, a $34 million mixed-use building that includes 257 apartments and approximately 10,000-square-feet of retail space, with construction expected to be completed this fall.
 
The other project is the Skyview. Like the Nolen, it is a mixed-use space, with 40 condos and 10,000-square-feet for shops. Construction on Skyview is expected by the end of the year.
 
In addition to the residential properties, downtown Clearwater is also experiencing a development boom in the way of restaurants.
 
“The downtown area is seeing a cluster of ethnic restaurants that is adding diversity to the food scene,” Lopez says. The restaurants include:
 
La Fondita de Leo
 
This establishment opened in the summer of 2015, and serves authentic Puerto Rican cuisine. Staples like mashed plantains, shredded chicken and corn fritters are offered, along with more savory options like stuffed chicken breast filled with cream cheese and bacon, the traditional mofongo dish and skirt steak. La Fondita de Leo is open for lunch and dinner.
 
Basil Fusion Bistro
 
With its opening at the end of 2015, Basil Fusion Bistro serves popular Vietnamese dishes. Open for breakfast and lunch only. Items on the menu include pho, spring rolls and smoothies.
 
Fuku Japanese Café
 
With its grand opening just before the New Year, Fuku looks forward to delighting customers with its sushi, ramen and yakisoba. The café is the brainchild of sushi chef Pla Sriwaree and his wife Aja Sriwaree, Fuku is a longtime dream of theirs that has come true. Fuku Japanese Café is open for lunch and dinner.
 
Lopez says that the combination of residential and commercial development is part of the overall vision the city has for the downtown area’s future.

“The city is striving for a vibrant, waterfront downtown destination with a mix of retail, restaurants, residential, office and recreational opportunities that attracts residents and visitors alike.”

Historic Clearwater neighborhood petitions city for brick streets

A historic neighborhood in Clearwater may soon take drivers down memory lane as brick streets replace the paved roads. Harbor Oaks neighborhood, located just north of Morton Plant Hospital, is a 110-home community dating back to the early 1900s.

“Harbor Oaks is a very historic neighborhood, however, there is a myth that it once had brick streets,” says Mike Quillen, director of engineering for the city of Clearwater. “The truth is there have never been brick streets there, if the petition passes then the neighborhood will get brick streets for the first time.”

The petition Quillen refers to has been made by residents of the Harbor Oaks neighborhood, which is comprised of multi-million dollar homes, some residents have been waiting years for the brick streets to become a reality for the future.

“Over the last few years, we have been looking into different solutions for traffic calming in that neighborhood and brick is one solution,” Quillen says. “It also looks very nice, which would likely raise the property value on the homes.”

He goes on to say that the timing for this project is advantageous for those who support the cause because there is already an underground infrastructure project underway, so the pavement has to be removed regardless.

“To do the brick streets would be a $1.8 million project as it is, so if the residents want this now would be the time to do it.”

The city will not be footing the bill on the project. The city will be polling the residents affected by the project, and if at least 65-percent are in favor, the brick will be installed with a special assessment put on the homes to cover the cost.  

“We will know what the decision is in the next few weeks,” Quillen says. “If it is approved, work on the brick streets will start a year from now.”

In addition to being an innovative, yet expensive answer to traffic calming, it is also a unique solution.

“We have researched a lot of cities throughout the states and it is very unusual to find a neighborhood that desires brick roads, Quillen says. “These days it is more common to find cities replacing their brick roads with asphalt.”

Roads that could potentially become brick streets include parts of Druid Road West, and Druid Road South, Jasmine Way, Magnolia Drive, Lotus Path, Bay Avenue, and small areas of Orange and Oak Avenues.
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