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University Of Tampa Residence Hall Meets Gold Standard

University of Tampa's newest residence hall is solid gold as an eco-friendly, green building.

The U.S. Green Building Council recently issued a LEED Gold certification for West Kennedy Hall, which opened in August 2013. It is the university's third certification from the council, which is recognized nationally as the standard setter for environmentally sound construction practices.

The university's Science Annex is also a LEED Gold certified building, and the Dickey Health and Wellness Center is LEED Silver.

West Kennedy Hall is an 11-story residence hall on Kennedy Boulevard that houses more than 520 students.

"I believe West Kennedy successfully both reflects the latest in University campus amenities and achieves innovative ways to conserve natural resources and lessen the impact on the environment," says UT President Ronald Vaughn.

The university wants buildings that are comfortable and user-friendly for people, says Taylor Ralph, president of REAL Building Consultants, which works with UT on its LEED certification.  

"But efficiency also is part of it," Ralph says. "That means that by not wasting money on energy costs the university can spend it in other areas. There is no sense in wasting energy. It makes fiscal sense."

The design, construction and operations of West Kennedy Hall includes the following green efficiencies:
  • Solar panels on the roof to heat water used by students
  • Low-flow shower heads and toilets that reduce water use by 38 percent, or more than 2.3 million gallons per year
  • Improved energy efficiency with a chilled water system, low-energy lighting and maximized natural daylight in rooms
  • Improved indoor air quality with environmentally-friendly paints, adhesives, sealants and other construction materials
  • Recycling of more than 78 percent of construction waste 
  • Recycling of rainwater stored in a storm water vault for irrigation of a portion of the campus
  • Landscaping with Florida-native and drought-tolerant plants
  • Green cleaning program to maintain the building with healthy cleaning practices and products
  • Reducing reliance on automobiles because the residence hall is within walking distance of bus stops, parks, the Tampa Riverwalk and restaurants
Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Ron Vaughn, University of Tampa

Tampa's East Hillsborough Avenue Attracts Investors, New Shops

East Hillsborough Avenue is attracting new investments -- a women's clothing shop and an as-yet-unannounced regional chain store. 
 
For Ron Harjani, owner of GQ Fashions at 3010 E. Hillsborough, the previous announcement that a Walmart Super Center will open a few blocks away next year is good news. It spurred him to build a 10,000-square-foot building next to GQ to house Fashion Essence, a family-operated women's clothing store. He also will have additional space available for lease.
 
Walmart, however, wasn't a major factor for another development plan.
 
ROI, a commercial property brokerage firm, is working with Florida Design Consultants and JVB Architect on developing a 25,000-square-foot building at the corner of Hillsborough and 32nd Street, next to Harjani's new building.
 
 ROI broker Eric Odum says a regional chain store, in the fashion and beauty market, will be the anchor tenant and occupy about 15,000 square feet.  Another 10,000 square feet is available for leasing.
 
Planning for the project began before Walmart's announced arrival, Odum says. But he says, "The visibility of our location is going to be phenomenal."
 
Design plans are undergoing revisions, Odum says, but construction is expected to begin this summer and take about six months. Funding for the project is from Platinum Bank.
 
Harjani expects to open Fashion Essence within the next month. His contractor is Final Touch Wall Systems with offices in Land O' Lakes and Valrico.
 
The location on Hillsborough is a prime spot, says Harjani. He also is encouraged by the redevelopment he sees in Tampa overall in recent years.
 
Walmart Super Center is scheduled to open, possibly as early as mid-2015, on East Hillsborough on about 12 acres stretching almost from 15th Street, next to VetCare Harris Animal Hospital, to 19th Street, across from McDonald's restaurant. The site was formerly home to Abraham Chevrolet automobile dealership but has been vacant for many years.
 
"Walmart is coming,"  Harjani says. "Hillsborough Avenue is parallel to Interstate 4 and a major thoroughfare going east to west. I personally think it's got a lot of potential."
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Sources: Eric Odum, ROI; Ron Harjani, GQ Fashions

Tampa Opens New Fire Station On Waters Avenue

Tampa firefighters had a nickname for the Sulphur Springs fire station #11 - the house of pain.
 
"It's because their (emergency) runs were so many," says Tampa Fire Chief Tom Forward.
 
This one station fielded then and now about 10 percent of all of Tampa's annual fire emergencies, reaching as many as 8,000 a year. It generally serves the neighborhoods of Sulphur Springs, Forest Hills and Lowry Park.
 
Today Fire Station #11 is as busy as ever but firefighters are working and sleeping in a much larger, state-of-the-art building. More than a dozen retired firefighters joined with Mayor Bob Buckhorn, Tampa Council Chairman Charlie Miranda and City Councilman Harry Cohen to officially welcome residents to an open house of their new fire station.
 
"In no uncertain terms this is the kind of station...the type of place that is worthy of the efforts (firefighters) put forth for us," Buckhorn says. "The house of pain just got a little better."
 
The approximately 8,700 square-foot building, at 1500 Waters Ave., replaces the small, aging station that for decades was tucked away on Fairbanks Street inside the Sulphur Springs neighborhood. Firefighters had to maneuver huge fire trucks down narrow residential streets and around tight corners to reach the intersection of Florida and Waters avenues.
    
The City of Tampa built the station soon after its annexation of Sulphur Springs in 1954. And, it was very much a neighborhood station. Retired firefighter Jim Galbraith, 69, says a close watch was kept of residents especially the elderly. "They'd call us in the morning," he says. "If we didn't get a call, we'd call them."
 
At a cost of $1.6 million, the new station has a modern design with a three-bay garage flanked by work and sleeping quarters and giving quick access to Waters. It was built by Pillar Construction.
 
The new station will allow the city to provide a more aggressive response time for this community, Forward says.
 
Funding is from community investment tax dollars. The station is eco-friendly and has efficiency lighting, solar-powered outside lighting and hot water heating, recycled materials and Florida-friendly landscaping. 
 
The city built Fire Station #22 in New Tampa with a similar design. A third fire station, #19, is expected to open in  August in Port Tampa
 
Source: Tom Forward, Tampa Fire Department
Writer: Kathy Steele
 
 

New Petra Restaurant Will Open On Kennedy Boulevard

Petra Restaurant will bring its Middle-Eastern cuisine to South and West Tampa within the next month
 
It will be the third location for owner Ayman Saed, who operates two other Petra restaurants in Temple Terrace and New Tampa.
 
The new location is directly across from the University of Tampa's lacrosse field in a vacant two-story building at 1118 W. Kennedy Blvd.  The spot has been home to several bars and restaurants including the Pachyderm Wing Company.
 
"I'm trying to tap into the many people here who want Middle Eastern food," says Saed. "I've never found the right location until now."

New businesses, restaurants and expansion plans by UT and Tampa General Hospital are sparking renewed commercial interest in this stretch of Kennedy from Ashley Drive to Howard Avenue. Downtown and North Hyde Park also are bringing in new residents who want more shopping and dining options. 
 
Re-modeling  began about three weeks ago. Saed hopes to open by the end of May.
 
There will be indoor seating as well as an outdoor patio and something not found at Saed's other restaurants -  a hookah lounge. On some evenings patrons will be able to enjoy live Middle Eastern music. The second floor will be available to rent for parties or other special events. There are no plans at this time to sell alcohol.
 
The New Tampa restaurant has been open about a year on Preserve Walk Lane in the Tampa Palms' neighborhood. The Temple Terrace restaurant, at 4812 E. Busch Blvd., opened about eight years ago.
 
 The restaurant and an adjacent convenience store were damaged in a fire more than two years ago. 
 
Saed says he was touched by the number of patrons who wanted to see the restaurant re-opened. In the end, he rebuilt and expanded Petra, opting to forego the store. And, he began searching for his third restaurant location.
 
The menu at the Kennedy Boulevard restaurant will be similar to the other locations with soups, salads, sandwiches, entrees and platters with selections including chicken shawarma and lamb kebabs. There also will be hummus, falafel and Baba ghanoush. And, daily chef specials will be offered including on some days, mansaf, a traditional lamb dish.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Ayman Saed, Petra Restaurant

Cristino's Coal-Oven Pizza Opens In Ybor City

After four years in Clearwater, the Cristino brothers -- Lenny, Marco and Joe -- found the perfect spot in Ybor City for their second Cristino's Coal-Oven Pizza and Italian restaurant.
 
"It brings the Old World back to Ybor," says Lenny Cristino.
 
The brothers had been searching for a long while for the right location, he says, and opted to renovate a vacant site at 1701 Eighth Avenue. Previously the building was operated as Spurs, a country bar with line dancing, and Play, a bar and live music venue.
 
The restaurant has an approximately 12-member staff.
 
The Cristinos hired award-winning architect Elliott Wheeler, owner of Elliott Wheeler Architect to give the restaurant a warm, Old World feel, and oversee installation of the brick coal-fired oven. Owner Lenny Cristino says the oven is one-of-a-kind cooking feature in Florida.
 
"That was a big challenge," says Wheeler who is based in Ybor City. "It's not a typical architectural feature."
 
It had to meet the design requirements of the Cristinos as well as city code, he says.
 
Wheeler primarily does design work for the hospitality industry and hotels including the Radisson Aquatic Barbados and Courtyard Marriott Savannah.
 
In addition to its use as bars, Wheeler says the building's history goes back decades, and also has seen used as offices and probably a convenience store
 
 In addition to indoor seating, Cristino's has an outdoor patio and bar. 
 
Cristino's menu features homemade pastas including Italian traditional dishes of ravioli and lasagna as well as a homemade vodka sauce for their penne vodka dish. Cold and hot paninis, chicken wings and salads also are available. Coal-oven pizzas are a specialty again made from scratch with homemade ingredients including tomato sauce and mozzarella. For dessert, there are homemade cheesecakes, cannoli and gelato slowed churn at the restaurant.
 
Cristino's also provides catering services.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Sources: Lenny Cristino, Cristino's; Architect Elliott Wheeler

Ridgewood Park Opens A Little Free Library

Electronic readers and tablets may be the wave of the future for many book readers. But an old concept -- the free lending library of printed books -- is finding new life in neighborhoods wanting to build a sense of community.
 
The concept has been popularized by Wisconsin nonprofit, Little Free Library, since 2009. The libraries pop up in yards, along bicycle trails and in parks in the guise of small wood boxes perched on thick posts and stuffed with paper books. The idea is to take a book to read and leave a book for someone else to read.
 
On April 12 Ridgewood Park residents will celebrate their Little Free Library, located in a linear park in the 2300 block of Glenwood Drive, off Columbus Drive. 
 
A day of celebration kicks off at 11:30 a.m. with refreshments and live music. Hillsborough County Commissioner Kevin Beckner is a guest speaker for the unveiling. The free library is funded with a mini-grant from the county's neighborhood relations office.
 
"I've wanted one for ages for the neighborhood," says Stacey Warder, president of the Ridgewood Park Crime Prevention and Civic Association. "It's not only literacy building, it's a unique piece of art. It's community building."
 
Ridgewood's Little Free Library is joining nearly 15,000 other libraries that have sprouted across the world. Wisconsin craftsman, Todd Bol, started the literacy movement when he built a tiny replica of a one-room school house and set it out on his lawn. He placed a sign saying "free books" and invited neighbors to share and swap books. Bol was honoring his mother, a former school teacher with a passion for reading.
 
The Ridgewood library resembles a little house. Warder added a coat of primer and artist Angie Cannata, of Lodestar Studio, constructed a glass mosaic with trees and a tin roof. Cannata also crafted a glass mosaic with the neighborhood's logo and Tampa's skyline in the background, which was installed on a storm drain cover. The neighborhood of bungalows is bounded by Columbus Avenue, North Boulevard and the Hillsborough River.
 
Shellie Posey will serve as library steward, checking to make sure the box is supplied with a mix of title selections. Initially, about 30 or so donated books will fill the box. 
 
Warder says a second library box has been ordered for children's books. It will be placed next to the first Little Free Library, and also added to the world map.
 
As an official Little Free Library, the site will be added to the Little Free Library's world map. "It's quite impressive," Warder says. "They are all over the world."
 
Little Free Library encourages the spread of these free libraries in a variety of ways. They sell the ready-made libraries but they are just as happy to see other nonprofits, individuals or organizations adopt the concept and build their own.
 
Mitzi Gordon, founder of Bluebird Books Bus, is a free library enthusiast whose nonprofit has sponsored four free libraries, two in St. Petersburg and two in Tampa. The most recent was set up in Seminole Heights.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Stacey Warder, Ridgewood Park Crime Prevention and Civic Association

Eco-friendly Communities Get New Design Guidelines

New urbanism is adding a new tool to its design palette for developing communities that are walkable, sustainable and eco-friendly.
 
For nearly 20 years the U.S. Green Building Council has issued certifications to show that building construction has met independent standards for environmental responsibility. But after testing a pilot program, a new certification is being offered, known as LEED ND, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design - Neighborhood Development.
 
This takes a more holistic approach to community development. 
 
On Wednesday, April 9, from noon to 1:30 p.m. the U.S. Green Building Council Florida Gulf Coast Chapter and the Congress for the New Urbanism Tampa Bay will host a luncheon meeting where urban designers Erin Chantry and Vinod Kadu will discuss the new rating system. The event is at The Charter House, 7616 W. Courtney Campbell Causeway.
 
Pasco County developer Frank Starkey also is guest speaker and will talk about his experiences with LEED in developing the new urban community of Longleaf as well as his views on what the new ratings mean for future development. 
 
The cost is $25 for organization members and $35 for non-members.
 
"(The new system) obviously takes into account not just buildings but the streets and overall development," says Taylor Ralph, a board member of the U.S. Green Building Council Florida Gulf Coast Chapter and president of REAL Building Consultants.
 
Storm water, energy efficiencies, sidewalks and recyling efforts are among the factors that will be reviewed in looking at the total project, Ralph says.
 
The Encore development, north of downtown, is expected to be one of the first master-planned communities in Florida to qualify for the new LEED certification.
 
Encore is a $425 million mixed-income housing and retail development being built by the Tampa Housing Authority and Banc of America Community Development Corp. The Ella, a 160-unit senior apartment building, opened in 2012 and is fully occupied. The Trio, a 141-unit multi-family apartment building, is opening in May. The Reed, a 158-unit senior apartment building, is slated to open in 2015 along with The Tempo, a 203-unit multi-family apartment building. Retail, a grocery store and a hotel also are anticipated for Encore.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Taylor Ralph, REAL Building Consultants

Historic Bungalow Turns Into Welcome Center, Safe House For LGBT Community

A historical bungalow will soon be home to the LGBT Welcome Center and Coffeehouse, a gathering place for the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) community and visitors to the Tampa Bay region.
 
An opening date is scheduled for June 27-29, the weekend of the St. Pete Pride Street Festival and Promenade, one of the country's largest gay pride events. However, funds are needed to complete on-going renovations.
 
At 7 p.m. April 11, The Studio @620 will host "Queery", a live music and art show to benefit the welcome center. The show will feature musical performances by Mark Castle, Young Egypt, Laser Collins + Lars Warn and artwork by Mia Culbertson, Emily Miller and Priscilla 3000. A $5 donation will be collected at the door. The Studio is located at 620 1st Ave. S., St. Petersburg.
 
Creating a welcome center at 2227 Central Ave. is a long-time goal of the nonprofit Metro Wellness and Community Centers, which for more than 20 years has provided the Tampa Bay community with a range of HIV services, wellness and social programs. The organization has locations in St. Petersburg, Tampa and New Port Richey.
 
"(The welcome center) will connect tourists and residents to our services and offer new space for a hangout and to hold meetings, to have classes, meet with friends and for dates," says Adam Jahr, Metro's program manager. "One of our goals is to be a safe space for at-risk and troubled youth."

Nearly half of the LGBT youth are bullied, says Jahr, adding that data also shows that about 40 percent of homeless youth are from the LGBT community.
 
The welcome center also will offer travel resources for visitors, such as special deals for dining and entertainment, and general information on arts, cultural events, ticket locations and "things to do" in the Tampa Bay area.
 
The bungalow was donated to the nonprofit and relocated a short distance from the historical Kenwood neighborhood to the Grand Central district. It sits next door to Metro's thrift store on Central Avenue.
 
In a "Name a Room" campaign, approximately $140,000 is being sought to renovate bungalow rooms including the living and dining rooms, kitchen and reading room. If you are interested in naming a room, contact Larry Biddle at 813-417-1225.
 
There also are opportunities to donate for items such as coffee mugs or t-shirts, and commemorative tiles to be installed in the bungalow's fireplace.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Adam Jahr, Metro Wellness and Community Centers

Seminole Heights Tour Showcases Historical Homes

Bungalows, mid-century Modern and more will be showcased at the 16th Annual Seminole Heights Home Tour.
 
The event is from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 6. The starting point is the Seminole Heights Garden Center at 5800 Central Ave. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 the day of the self-guided tour.
 
A portion of the proceeds will benefit Urban Art Attack and Habitat for Humanity. The tour is sponsored by the Old Seminole Heights Neighborhood Association and the Old Seminole Heights Preservation Consortium.
 
Nine homes are on the tour representing every neighborhood within the Greater Seminole Heights' area including Old Seminole Heights, Hampton Terrace, Southeast Seminole Heights and South Seminole Heights.
 
The varied architectural styles reflect the historical character of one of Tampa's oldest suburbs, initially founded in the 1900s. There are 1920s bungalows lovingly restored but also homes from the 1940s and 50s. One home shows how a mid-century Modern kitchen renovation can be true to its historical period and also up-to-date with modern conveniences.
 
Seminole Heights in recent years has emerged as a destination neighborhood with restaurants, shops, coffee houses, bars and micro-breweries.
 
"I like the culture and diversity (of Seminole Heights)," says Bill Truett, a home tour committee member. "The area is still showcasing what it's like to live here."
 
People can pick up tickets and maps at the garden center on the day of the tour. They will be able to drive on their own or hop on one of the Jolley Trolleys. In addition, the Seminole Heights Bicycle Club will have a mapped route for people who choose to ride bicycles. The bike route will be clearly marked on the roadways and members of the Tampa Police Department's Bike Patrol will assist with navigating busy streets and intersections.
 
For more information and advance ticket locations, visit the association's website.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Bill Truett, Seminole Heights Neighborhood Association

Symposium Aids New, Existing Small Businesses In East Tampa

Wondering how to build a marketing plan that will grow your business? Or just want to  know the nuts and bolts of how to start a new business?
 
The all-day Tampa Bay Small Business Symposium will gather experts in business, marketing, finance and government who will share advice and offer encouragement. The free event will be held from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, March 29, at the NFL Yet Center at Jackson Heights at 3310 E. Lake Ave.
 
Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn will be guest speaker with a message on "Creating New Opportunities for Small Business."
 
There will be panel discussions, break-out sesssions and  a networking luncheon with guest speaker Charles Long of the U.S. Small Business Administration. Symposium topics include marketing, finance, networking, technology and social media. 
 
"We want to help the person who is new to business or has a business and wants to know how to expand, how to get into computers or hire more people," says Essie Sims, event moderator and chairman of the East Tampa Community Revitalization Partnership. "How do you get from the garage to brick and mortar?"
 
The partnership is a volunteer advisory group that works with Tampa city officials on redevelopment strategies for the East Tampa area. It is one of several event sponsors and participants including the city of Tampa, Hillsborough County, Central Florida Community Planning & Development, SmallBusiness Symposium.com, Hispanic Business Initiative Fund, Tampa Bay Economic Development Corporation,  Suncoast Credit Union, Sam's Club and Blue Lynx Marketing.
 
This is the second annual business symposium. Last year's event drew about 200 people, says Carrol Josephs-Marshall, symposium organizer and partnership board member.
 
The focus this year is on break-out sessions to allow more one-on-one discussions between business owners and panel experts.
 
People ready to start a business will be able to get information on the programs, tools, strategies and support organizations that can help turn an idea into a reality. New businesses or established businesses can find out how to move to the next level with advice on marketing, finances and technology.
 
"We're hoping to help small businesses sustain themselves, to give them the tools they need to succeed," says Josephs-Marshall.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Essie Sims and Carrol Josephs-Marshall, East Tampa Community Revitalization Partnership

Le Meridien Hotel Plans June 1 Opening In Downtown Tampa

Get ready for Tampa's newest luxury hotel. The renovated and historical Classic Federal Courthouse on Florida Avenue is almost ready for its debut as Le  Meridien.
 
Opening date for the upscale, 130-room hotel is June 1, with a grand opening planned for later that month. It is one of 11 Le Meridien Hotels & Resorts planned in the next 12 months by Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide.
 
Le Meridien Tampa brings an artsy vibe to what the city plans as an "art promenade" on Zack Street between Florida and Ashley Drive. Guests at Le Meridien will receive a free pass to the Tampa Museum of Arts. A wall on the main floor, near Bizou Brasserie and Longitude Bar, will be a gallery of the best from local artists.
 
"Le Meridiens around the world emphasize art," says Gary Prosterman, CEO of Development Services Group in Memphis. "It has a tremendous amount of architectural features that are really appealing. It's obviously a different experience from just your typical business class hotel or certainly different from a select service hotel."
 
The "cultural heritage traveler" and the creative segment of travelers, regardless of profession, will appreciate the environment and amenities at Le Meridien, Prosterman says.
 
The 109-year-old neo-classical building is on the National Register of Historic Places but for years sat vacant. In 2012 the city, with Tampa City Council approval, agreed to a long-term lease. DSG was selected as developers for the project. Kobi Karp of Miami did the conceptual design: The Beck Group is design builder, serving as architect and construction manager; and Ferrell Redevelopment of Tampa consulted on the building's historic preservation.
 
Two courtrooms have been transformed. One is now the Bizou at the top of a grand staircase leading to the main floor. A fourth floor courtroom is the hotel's ballroom.
 
Marble and terrazzo features, floor-to-ceiling windows and extra wide corridors recall the grandeur of the historical courthouse.  Guests can enjoy modern conveniences of business and fitness centers, an outdoor lawn area for dining, the restaurant, bakery, coffee house and bar, and a garden.
 
Room rates will vary with peak season prices ranging from about $180 to $280; in off-peak season rooms will be about $150 to $220.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Gary Prosterman

Jet City Espresso Opens In Seminole Heights In Tampa

Drop by Jet City Espresso in Seminole Heights and you may find yourself in the midst of a jam session. Guitars, ukulele and banjo, within easy reach of a comfy couch, are invitations for the musically inclined to start strumming and singing. A tuner and pick are on the mantelpiece.
 
They aren't just a decorative whim.
 
"We don't mind if you pick them up and play them," says Jet City General Manager Veronica Lee.
 
Within the past month this Seattle-style coffee house has settled into a 1920s bungalow at 5803 N. Florida Ave. The house is the former location for Jai Dee Yoga and Wellness Studio which moved to its new location at 5610 N. Nebraska Ave.
 
Owner Jessica Glover did little to change the warm, earthy decor of the bungalow's interior beyond adding a kitchen and preparation area. "The inside was just so gorgeously done," Glover says. "We didn't have to change that."
 
Glover opened her first Jet City Espresso nearly three years ago in her Hyde Park home on South Edison Avenue. The Seminole Heights' coffee house is an expansion into a revitalized neighborhood that Glover has had her eye on for quite some time.
 
"We like the uniqueness here, the community of people," Glover says. "We love to see it turning around and focusing on the positive. I'm super happy with this here."
 
A grand opening in Seminole Heights is in the planning stages within the next weeks. And, Lee says open mic nights will follow with Irish and folk music among the genres that will be played.
 
An alcohol beverage license to sell beer and wine is pending and extended hours are anticipated. For now the coffee shop is open for breakfast and lunch.
 
Glover bakes daily, offering an assortment of scones, breads, bagels, quiches and cakes. The menu also has fresh salads and sandwiches. Gluten-free and paleo options are available.
 
Freshly ground and brewed lattes and coffees are poured, including Jet City's signature "Cafe Borgia," a honey, orange infused latte with nutmeg and orange zest.
 
Glover favors local produce and fresh foods and recyclable/compostable products.
 
Some of her menu items go back 18 years to when she first opened a Jet City Espresso in Tampa in the mid-1990s. "It was the first Seattle-style coffee in Tampa," says Glover, a Seattle native. "I was light years ahead of the game. It was so new to Tampa."
 
She closed her shop after five years and opened a restaurant in Colorado. In 2008 Glover returned to Tampa and revived Jet City Espresso, a concept that is in tune with its time.
 
"I love it," says Glover.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Jessica Glover

Cry Baby Cafe Arrives On Harbour Island By Downtown Tampa

Cry Baby Cafe is a new arrival to Harbour Island and one that owner Andrew Bonnemort wasn't expecting. But he had a ready name at hand when a spot suddenly opened up across from his long-time restaurant Café Dufrain.
 
The name is one his mother had long wanted to use for a restaurant. She even had a logo concept inspired by the family's ranching history that Fourthdoor Creative Group sketched out for her son's cafe, at 710 Harbour Post Drive.
 
The roadway ends a few yards away at Garrison Channel with views across the water of Tampa's skyline and the Tampa Bay Times Forum.
 
"It worked out perfectly that (Cry Baby  Cafe) is right across the street," says Cathy Bellatin, who is in charge of events and marketing for Bonnemort's restaurants.
 
Cafe Dufrain, at 707 Harbour Post Drive, began more than 10 years ago as a deli-coffee shop but soon expanded into dinner hours with beer and wine.
 
Cry Baby is a gourmet sandwich and coffee shop where breads, croissants, quiches and baguettes are baked on-site daily. No preservatives, fillers or artificial flavors are used.
 
Breakfast items include goat cheese souffle and steel cut oatmeal with dried fruit. For lunch there is a variety of sandwiches including a "Roscoe" with hand-carved smoked brisket, red onion, cry baby relish and grain mustard served on a French roll. Premium vegetarian-fed meats are supplied by North Country Smokehouse, a New Hampshire-based business that has been family-owned for more than a 100 years.
 
Organic coffee is made for Cry Baby Cafe by Sweetwater Organic Coffee Roasters in Gainesville, Fl., and meets fair trade standards.
 
"We try to locally source whenever possible," says Bellatin.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Cathy Bellatin, Cry Baby Cafe

Trader Joe's Opens In South Tampa

For Tampa's hard core fans of Trader Joe's, the treks to Sarasota are over. At 8 a.m. Friday, Trader Joe's brings its quirky brand of grocery shopping to South Tampa.
 
With some fanfare, but not too much, Trader Joe's takes over the former Shapes fitness center at 3808 Swann Ave., west of Dale Mabry Highway.
 
"We cut the cord of a giant lei," says Trader Joe's spokeswoman Rachel Broderick.
 
And, the shopping begins.
 
Store manager Aimee Pawelek and Regional VP Kent Smathers will be on hand for the lei-cutting.
 
Expect to get a flower necklace handed to you from Trader Joe's sales crew. They'll stand out from the crowd in loud Hawaiian shirts. A day of festive celebration is planned with food demonstrations, live music, a balloon artist and more.
 
Copies of Trader Joe's irreverent newsletter, "Fearless Flyer" will soon arrive in area resident mailboxes.
 
The much-anticipated opening day is bally-hooed on Facebook pages, blogs and media outlets. It was the source of rumor and speculation nearly a year ago when Shapes closed its gym in July.

Trader Joe's doesn't release figures on job hires, but Broderick says 70 percent of the jobs were filled with local residents.
 
Cap Dale Mabry LLC, a Greenville, S.C. development company and affiliate of Centennial American Properties, bought the site in August 2013 for about $2.7 million, according to Hillsborough County records. Barry Byrd Architecture of Knoxville, Tenn. did the design.
 
The decor mixes cedar-covered walls with Hawaiian tiki-style features. Colorful murals throughout the store honor Tampa Bay history including Plant Hall, Hillsborough River State Park, Ybor City and Clearwater Beach.
 
The former gym was expanded slightly to about 12,300 square feet. Trees were added to the landscaping to buffer the adjacent parking lot from nearby homes. Centennial American Properties also got variances to install three Trader Joe's signs.
 
The California-based grocery store that morphed into Trader Joe's was founded in the late 1950s. It adopted the Trader Joe's name in 1967.
 
Shoppers are attracted to the off-beat, eclectic and ever-changing products that fill Trader Joe's shelves. As many as 3,000 items bear Trader Joe's brand name including Trader Joe's salsas, fried rice and marinara sauces. As many as a dozen new items are added to shelves weekly.
 
Ruggedly Adventurous Cowboy Bark, Tandoori Naan, Collier's Welsh Cheddar Cheese, Kenya AA Coffee and Palak Paneer are among products listed on the company website. But there is also Trader Joe's Raw Pignolias (pine nuts), Grass Fed Wagyu Beef Burgers and Chocolate Chip Scone Mix. And the now-Three-Buck Chuck Wine (pay more if you like) is ready for a party.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Sources: Rachel Broderick, Trader Joe's

The Busy Buddy Moves Into Dade City's SMARTstart Incubator

The Busy Buddy is moving from home base to office space as it joins other fledgling businesses at the SMARTstart incubator site in the Dade City Business Center.
 
Owner and President Kellye Dash, 39, started her business support services company as a part-time venture operated from her home while working full-time as an Information Technology (IT) manager for another company.
 
In 2012 she took The Busy Buddy full-time and in January moved into the business center at 15000 Citrus Country Drive in Dade City in northeast Pasco County. 
 
"I always knew I wanted to have my own business," says Dash, a 2007 graduate of the University of South Florida. "This is my opportunity to strike out on my own."
 
She currently works with two sub-contractors to help businesses on a range of issues, including social media, email marketing, web research, database cleanups, event and meeting coordination, and special projects
.
One of her clients is Tampa engineering firm, Heidt Design, which has worked on residential development projects including Fishhawk Ranch.
 
"I'm looking to grow," says Dash. She plans to add staff as her business expands both locally and nationally.
 
SMARTstart is managed by the Pasco Economic Development Council, Inc. It is the first venture of its kind in the county, providing networking opportunities and technical support to small businesses. While some startup companies are located at the business center, others are located off-site.
 
"We're all trying to grow and collaborate and share in the challenges we have and help each other," says Dash.
 
She grew up in the Washington, D.C. area and moved to Tampa nearly a decade ago. She lives in Wesley Chapel with her three daughters.
 
In the future, Dash is planning to offer an internship at her company. She especially wants to be a mentor to girls and women. "You can do whatever you want to do," she says.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Kellye Dash, The Busy Buddy
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