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Net Zero Energy Building Opens In St. Petersburg

St. Petersburg's first self-sustaining, net zero building celebrated its grand opening on Monday, December 3rd.

As Florida's first designated green city, St. Petersburg is the new home of the Sierra Club's state headquarters and Big Sea Design and Development and Roundhouse Creative offices.

Built by All Florida Management with partners Bosch and Florida garden center Twig Leaves, St. Pete's first self-sustaining, net zero building is a U.S. Green Building Council LEED Platinum applicant, fully equipped with environmentally friendly solar photovoltaic (PV) panels, electric vehicle (EV) charging stations, a water-to-air geothermal heat exchange system, glare-reducing thermal barrier window tinting, green spaces with native landscaping, rainwater harvesting and a weekly recycling program.

In other words: zero energy bill.

“These days, green businesses aren't just focused on developing earth-friendly technologies -- they are committed to offering a product or service that consumers know has little to no environmental impact,” says Tom Hall, the building's developer and managing partner of All Florida Management. “The emergence of this new green business culture has allowed our company to focus on meeting the needs of the small business community by dedicating ourselves to cultivating environmentally conscious commercial building platforms that reflect both our clients' personal and professional values.”

Roundhouse Creative is one of those small businesses looking to take advantage of everything the new eco-friendly building has to offer; Andrew Lee and his wife, Brooke, founded their production studio in 2007, focused on telling powerful stories and creating beautiful designs. Roundhouse Creative moved into a 2,600-square-foot space in the new building that is shared with Big Sea Design and Development.

“We made the decision years ago in our personal lives to be conscious of the environment and are excited about what being net zero will mean to our customers,” says Lee. “By hiring Roundhouse Creative, our customers can now benefit from the fact that their new website, TV commercial or web video has been produced with a near net zero environmental impact.”

With Roundhouse Creative's new space currently open for business, Lee looks forward to thriving in downtown St. Pete: What he calls a regional hub for art, culture and great food.

“Innovative, forward-thinking projects like this building are a perfect fit for the city and add to why I love St. Pete. I couldn't be more excited about what this project means for the area,” he says. “I hope other business owners become educated on the benefits of net zero and understand that they can now make conscious decisions for their business with the environment and future generations in mind.”

Writer: Alexis Quinn Chamberlain
Source: Tom Hall, All Florida Management & Andrew Lee, Roundhouse Creative

Tampa Mayor Adds StreetLights, Improves Safety

Thanks to a multimillion dollar investment, Tampa's about to get a lot brighter.

Mayor Bob Buckhorn announced a new street lighting program, “Bright Lights, Safe Nights,” a $2.2 million commitment over the next five years to expand the city's current streetlight network by 30 percent.

“Brighter lights mean safer neighborhoods and safer streets,” says Buckhorn. “Joining with our partners at TECO, this initiative will eliminate dark areas where criminals can hide and illuminate streets and intersections where our children cross.”

Improving Tampa's quality of life, approximately 8,400 new streetlights will be strategically placed throughout the city, including Community Redevelopment Areas and zones with high crime and/or crash rates; installation will begin in January 2013 with approximately 1,683 new lights per year.

Tampa Electric will oversee the installation with the City of Tampa funding electricity and maintenance; the City currently funds 30,000 streetlights, totaling $5 million annually.

“We've been lighting Tampa for 114 years and we look forward to doing our part to meet the Mayor's goal,” says Gordon Gillette, president of Tampa Electric and Peoples Gas.

According to the Federal Highway Administration, early-morning and nighttime crashes can be reduced by about 35 percent with additional streetlights.

In addition, two research projects by the Institute of Criminology at the United Kingdom's University of Cambridge in 2005 found that documented crimes decreased up to 45 percent with the financial savings from reduced crimes exceeding the cost of lighting by up to 10 times.

“A well-light city is a safer city,” says Buckhorn.

“Bright Lights, Safe Nights” fulfills Buckhorn's promise to complete a citywide lighting inventory, determining where updates and repairs are necessary throughout Tampa, including the replacement of dimming streetlights and removal of tree branch obstructions.

The City is asking residents to request repairs on existing streetlights and/or submit suggestions for new streetlight locations.

Writer: Alexis Quinn Chamberlain
Source: Mayor Bob Buckhorn, City of Tampa & Gordon Gillette, Tampa Electric and Peoples Gas

Tampa Spay/Neuter Clinic Moves, Increases Services

If you visit the Animal Coalition of Tampa Spay/Neuter Clinic on Lemon Street on a typical day, you'll see clients braving the summer heat and storms under tents pitched in the parking lot.

Affectionately called the "waiting room,'' the tents are a temporary solution to space issues experienced by the clinic. With an average of 20,000 animals served per year, the clinic has outgrown its 3,000-square-feet space and plans to move to a new building on Gilchrist Avenue on October 9.
 
"We needed so much to come together for the building to be right,'' says Linda Hamilton, the clinic's founder and executive director.

The new building, located four blocks from the current one, was chosen because of its proximity to the existing space (to keep their dedicated staff and clients), large parking area, reasonable rent, ideal size and layout.
 
With the mission of ending unnecessary euthanasia of dogs and cats in Hillsborough County, the Spay/Neuter Clinic first opened in 2006 to provide low cost, high quality spay/neuter services to low-income residents. Since then, services have been expanded to include vaccine packages and even life-saving surgeries.

"It's because of the community's reactions to our services that moving became such a critical need,'' says Hamilton. "People bring in a pet they have saved from the street or a shelter, and they are able to give it a home because of our affordable prices.''
 
The new building will allow ACT to offer pet care classes for the public on topics such as managing feral cats and grieving the loss of a pet. They also plan to utilize more volunteers and loan space to local rescue groups for meetings.

"We want our clients to know that someone is there for them, to help them keep their animals in the home rather than surrendering them to a shelter. The building is in honor of the community, who cares and wants to see unnecessary euthanasia finally come to an end,'' says Hamilton.
 
Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Linda Hamilton, ACT Spay/Neuter Clinic

Explore Downtown Tampa Architecture On QR Code Tour

AIA Tampa Bay members are serving as guides for Do the Local Motion's Discover Design Architect Tour of downtown Tampa's unique architecture on Friday, Oct. 5, from noon to 1 p.m

The one-hour tour, beginning at Lykes Gaslight Square Park in downtown Tampa, will include five to six historically significant buildings that contribute to the city's sense of place. The event is free and open to the public. Just show up!

Tampa Bay residents and visitors also can experience downtown Tampa's unique architecture through a self-guided walking tour using QR codes. The tour was launched as part of the Tampa Bay Chapter of the American Institute of Architects' Archifest in October 2011. Twelve new sites were added in August this year, bringing the total to 23.

"It's another way to get the public thinking about architecture,'' says Dawn Mages, executive director for AIA Tampa Bay. The tour is free and both phone and tablet-friendly, making it attractive to people visiting downtown.

Participants can start the tour by visiting Tour Tampa Bay Architecture, where they will find maps of the sites and pictures showing where the QR codes can be found. Some codes are obscure, whereas others stand out on windows and can be found while passing by. The website also includes historic sites in Ybor City and Hyde Park.

The tour has had 600 unique visitors since the new buildings were added in August. The most popular building is Tampa Theatre on Franklin Street, followed by Sacred Heart Church on Florida Avenue. Rivergate Tower on Ashley Street is a favorite among architects.

AIA was recently awarded a grant from the Florida Department of State's Division of Historical Resources and is also receiving support from the Tampa Downtown Partnership. Future plans include site enhancements such as professional videos to provide more information about the buildings.

Additional local events honoring Archtober can be found on AIA Tampa Bay’s website.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Dawn Mages, AIA Tampa Bay

Gift To USF: $12 Million Toward New College Of Global Sustainability

Thanks to the help of Drs. Kiran C. and Pallavi Patel, a new College of Global Sustainability may be in the works for the University of South Florida (USF).

The latest contribution to the USF: Unstoppable Campaign -- a $600 million effort to celebrate the energy, vision and future of the university -- the Patels recently donated $12 million to the university toward an endowment aimed at creating the new Patel College of Global Sustainability.

The new college will expand on nearly a decade of research in an attempt to advance sustainability around the globe.

“The Earth is God's gift to humanity and we believe that the current generation must ensure that while meeting our present needs,” the Patels say. “The world's rapidly depleting resources and growing population require us to become more efficient and think of new ways to develop sustainable and renewable sources of clean water, energy, food and transportation.”

Upon university approval, the new Patel college -- which could begin accepting students as early as January 2013 -- will bring the current work of the Patel School of Global Sustainability to a new level, allowing it to focus on improved urban systems, water and transportation.

Recently, the Patel School of Global Sustainability, which Pallavi Patel calls a “do tank, not a think tank,” became the first North American university to obtain a research and strategy partnership with the UN-HABITAT Partner University Initiative. Together, USF and UN-HABITAT will establish the first United Nations Urban Futures Research Hub in the U.S., promoting education and professional development in emerging cities.

“We are inspired by the Patels' vision of a world where all people have a real chance to reach their full potential in a clean, healthy environment,” says USF President Judy Genshaft. “We are humbled that they have entrusted USF to be a partner in making the vision of a better tomorrow a reality. The Patels' trust in us means as much as the money they give.”

Right here in Tampa, the current Patel School has created a multiyear learning and research partnership with water management in the Netherlands called Resilient Tampa Bay. An effort to prepare the region for potential urban flooding challenges brought by hurricanes and rising sea levels, the program is guiding future development in an attempt to protect areas vulnerable to severe flooding.

The latest $12 million gift from the Patels brings the family's contribution to USF to $25.8 million. Through a series of donations and matching state funds, the Patels have focused their endowments and attention on sustainable global development and healthcare through supporting the Dr. Kiran C. Patel Center for Global Solutions Endowment Fund, USF Health, the Dr. Kiran Patel Center for Global Solutions Operating Fund and the Patel Center for Global Solutions.

According to Genshaft, the Patels leadership, influence and donations have helped USF become one of the top 50 research universities in the nation.

Writer: Alexis Quinn Chamberlain
Source: Drs. Kiran C. and Pallavi Patel & Judy Genshaft, USF

TradeWinds Sandpiper Suites Becomes Guy Harvey Outpost, St. Pete Beach

The TradeWinds Sandpiper Suites on St. Petersburg Beach has now become Guy Harvey Outpost.

A TradeWinds Beach Resort, the $3 million rebranding of the 211-room beachfront property, at 6000 Gulf Blvd. in St. Pete, marks the first Guy Harvey Outpost in the U.S. The Outpost celebrated its grand opening on September 12th.

“Due to the growing popularity of Guy Harvey, his brand and conservation efforts, the timing is great,” says Keith Overton, president of TradeWinds Island Resorts. “Guy has a lot of fans in the country and this gives them a place to come to experience his lifestyle, see his artwork and live his ideals. We're thrilled with the opportunity to work with Guy on creating a sustainable, green environment for our guests.”

Some highlights of the project include Guy Harvey décor in all guestrooms, a Guy Harvey Outfitter Shop, eco-based programs and activities, a renovation of the resort's current restaurant and beach bar and the addition of a marine-themed Guy Harvey restaurant with lounge area, private dining and retail store.

“Through our partnership with Guy Harvey, we're looking forward to building on our commitment to conservation and education while continuing to provide extensive recreational options for our guests,” says Overton. “These programs will not only be a wonderful addition for our guests, but will also positively impact local and regional tourism. Visitors, locals and guests will all be able to have fun while learning about conservation and our area's unique marine environment.”

One of Guy Harvey Outpost's first endeavors is the sponsorship of the auditorium at the new Florida Gulf Coast Center for Fishing and Interactive Museum in Largo.

According to Overton, guests of Guy Harvey Outpost should expect the same service that was given at TradeWinds Sandpiper Suites and will still have access to the amenities at the Island Grand, including the JetLev, surf school, High Tide Water Slide and Splash Island Water Park.

New carpet, paint, artwork and flat screen HDTV's are expected in all Outpost guestrooms by December 2012 with the Guy Harvey-themed restaurant and lounge seeing development in 2013.

Writer: Alexis Quinn Chamberlain
Source: Keith Overton, TradeWinds Island Resorts

Ballast Point Park In Tampa Caters To Kids, Families

Looking for a cool place to take the kids on a hot afternoon? Check out the new play spaces, climbing apparatus and water jets at the redesigned Ballast Point Park in south Tampa.

Designed by Hardeman-Kempton and Associates, construction on the $995,602 improvement project began in December 2011 and was funded by the City of Tampa's Community Investment Tax (CIT). The City matched a portion of funds raised by Ballast Point for a tot lot, a playground for children under 5 years old.

Ballast Point Park has been an integral part of our community for over 100 years,” says Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn. “It's a popular spot because it has something from everyone -- from the fishing pier to the expanded wellness center to the new splash pad.”

In addition, park improvements include a sail structure to cover an existing playground, a great circular lawn, four new prefabricated picnic shelters featuring benches and grills, eight additional parking spaces and a new patio at the existing Joe Abrahams Fitness and Wellness Center. Florida friendly landscaping and irrigation were also installed.

The park also features a New England-style restaurant, Taste of Boston, featuring seafood, burgers, a kid's menu and Old Meeting House brand ice cream served on the edge of the Tampa Bay. The restaurant recently underwent new management.

Ballast Point Park was originally developed as a tropical park in 1984, serving as a terminal for an electric trolley-car line at the south end of Bayshore Boulevard; the park was previously named Jules Verne Park.

Writer: Alexis Quinn Chamberlain
Source: Mayor Bob Buckhorn, City of Tampa

TGH Moves Offices To New Corporate Center, Downtown Tampa

Tampa General Hospital (TGH) has moved a number of its offices to the new Corporate Center on Kennedy Boulevard in downtown Tampa.

Located at 606 Kennedy Blvd., the hospital renovated a two-story, 52,000-square-foot facility originally built in 1926, making enough space to relocate approximately 450 TGH employees on 5.6 acres of land just west of downtown Tampa.

“Many TGH offices were moved to the new TGH Corporate Center so we could convert the spaces they previously occupied at the hospital into patient care,” says TGH Manager of Construction Services Kelly Glass. “The Kennedy Boulevard location was the right size for us and is in close proximity to the hospital.”

Designed to U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) requirements, existing wood flooring, brick arches and several items for added energy efficiency were left in place from the original architecture of the Bryn-Alan Photography laboratory and call center. According to Glass, the center expects to receive LEED Certification upon completion of a more than 450-space parking lot; the lot is currently under construction.

“The building was designed to blend into the current, new architecture of the Kennedy Boulevard area,” Glass says. “We believe the addition of the Corporate Center is a positive influence in the redevelopment of the corridor.”

Approximately $9.7 million was spent on purchasing the land for the Corporate Center with an additional $5 million spent on renovations.

Writer: Alexis Quinn Chamberlain
Source: Kelly Glass, TGH

Crescent Resources Begins Work On Apartment Community On Bayshore, Tampa

A new eight-story, 367-unit apartment community is in the works for Bayshore Boulevard in Tampa.

North Carolina-based Crescent Resources is working on a $68 million project, Circle Bayshore, located at 319 Bayshore Blvd., just minutes from the Lee Roy Selmon Crosstown Expressway, Hyde Park Village, Channelside, downtown Tampa and Ybor City.

Circle Bayshore will rent studio, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartment units featuring high ceilings; walk-in closets; private balcony; full-size washer and dryer; gourmet kitchen with granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, undermount sinks and a prep island; and bathrooms finished with custom wood cabinetry, ceramic tile floors and granite countertops.

“Circle Bayshore will offer its residents a unique lifestyle in an uncommon location with amazing amenities, first-class programming and high-quality interiors,” says Brian Natwick, president of Crescent Resources' multifamily division.

Keen on going green, Circle Bayshore is expected to incorporate a number of sustainable, energy efficient features and materials, ultimately receiving Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification from the U.S. Green Building Council.

In addition, the bay-front community will feature high-end amenities including a resort-style swimming pool, two-story health club and fitness center, outdoor living area with grilling stations and a fire pit, business center and club room.

Funded by an equity investment from Crescent Resources, construction financing from Capital One and mezzanine financing from Nationwide Real Estate Investments, the new community was designed by MSA Architects of Miami with Fort Lauderdale's Moss & Associates acting as general contractor, King Engineering of Tampa as civil engineer and Orlando's Land Resource Design Group, Inc. as landscape architect.

Crescent Resources expects to break ground on Circle Bayshore by October 2012 with initial apartments complete by the first quarter of 2014.

Writer: Alexis Quinn Chamberlain
Source: Brian Natwick, Crescent Resources

New Urban, Green Community Near Downtown St. Pete

A newly renovated 176-unit multifamily apartment community is in the works for St. Petersburg.

An example of affordable urban housing, Avesta Woodlawn Park by Avesta Homes touts itself as "St. Pete's first sensibly green apartment community" located on 18th Avenue just minutes from downtown, offering double-pane, low-e windows, ENGERY STAR appliances, water efficient landscaping featuring native plants, LED lighting, efficient plumbing fixtures and an on-site recycling program.

Avesta Woodlawn Park embodies the urban “live, work and play” concept, promoting alternative ways to travel with covered bike parking for residents and easy access to public transportation.

“Avesta Homes is very excited to be a part of the St. Petersburg community,” says Carol Toffolo, Avesta Homes director of marketing. “Improvement of a local neighborhood community while attracting residents will directly benefit local shops and business owners. Our improvements (the renovation and beautification of the prior Woodlawn Park property) increase the desirability for future home buyers and renters in the local area.”

Residents of the new urban community will also have access to eco-friendly amenities such as a community garden, fenced dog park, fitness trail and workout stations, private fenced backyards and a swimming pool featuring poolside WiFi.

The $3 million renovation project is slated to be complete by December 2012. Units are expected to be available for rent beginning September 2012 ranging from as low as $695 for a one-bedroom and up to $895 for a two-bedroom.

Writer: Alexis Quinn Chamberlain
Source: Carol Toffolon, Avesta Homes

New Trees, Artsy Bridge Lighting Spruce Up Downtown Tampa

Almost 800 strategically planted new trees and artsy lightning along Tampa's downtown bridges are among the most noticiable improvements made by the City of Tampa in preparation for the RNC.

The Opportunity Corridors Project planted 782 indigenous trees such as Southern Red Cedar, Chickasaw Plum and Sabal Palms along major streets in downtown neighborhoods; irrigation and lighting were also installed.

Agua Luces by Artist Tracey Dear features colorful lighting along five of nine downtown bridges, including the Platt Street Bridge, Brorein Street Bridge, Kennedy Boulevard Bridge, the Crosstown Expressway overpass and CSX Railroad Bridge.

The downtown Opportunity Corridors -- what Mayor Bob Buckhorn calls the “front doors” of the city -- include Bayshore Boulevard from Platt Street to Rome Avenue, Ashley Drive, the Organe/Jefferson Interchange, Union Station, Laurel Street, Franklin Street and Nuccio Parkway.

“Mayor Buckhorn believes that major transportation arteries are economic development opportunities,” says David Vaughn,  City of Tampa director of contract administrations.

The city plans to expand the tree plantings in concentric circles beyond downtown.  The goal is to encourage the improved corridors to grow neighborhood support through retail, creating a more pedestrian-friendly environment.

Agua Luces is an initiative of the Lights On Tampa Committee, Tampa Electric and Peoples Gas.

Writer: Alexis Quinn Chamberlain
Source: David Vaughn, City of Tampa

East Tampa Community Builds Playground, Ragan Park

Joined by Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn and Florida Rep. Dana D. Young, representatives of Humana, the East Tampa Community Revitalization Partnership, V.M. Ybor Neighborhood Association, KaBOOM! and community volunteers recently came together for a legacy project playground build associated with the 2012 Republican National Convention (RNC).

Benefiting the East Tampa community well beyond August's RNC event in Tampa, a new, one-of-a-kind, multigenerational playground was built at Ragan Park at 1200 E. Lake Ave. in just six hours on Saturday, August 11th. The unique 3,780-square-foot space features equipment designed to serve all ages from kids to seniors.

“The site was selected before our neighborhood's involvement and it is my understanding that the selection was based on replacement needs and the site's ability to incorporate some multigenerational components such as exercise and fitness stations,” says Kim Headland, president of the V.M. Ybor Neighborhood Association. “Humana was a willing partner and Ragan Park needed a new playground -- what better timing!”

Prior to recent investment, Ragan Park featured an older, worn playground desperately in need of replacement; the old play space was recently removed in preparation for Saturday's volunteer-based event. The park also features a small building for community events, a pond and a walking trail.

The new, customized playground, funded primarily by Humana and East Tampa TIF funding, was created by personal drawings and suggestions from local community members in an attempt to create a lasting neighborhood legacy promoting healthy play and living.

“The V.M. Ybor Neighborhood Association, in partnership with the East Tampa Community Revitalization Partnership, have been part of the KaBOOM! process since the preparations began for Saturday's Design Day,” Headland says. “Participation has ranged from weekly conference calls, solicitations for community donations, recruitment of volunteers and dissemination of information throughout the community.”

Approximately $43 million in projects throughout the Tampa Bay region is expected to be spent in conjunction with the 2012 RNC. In addition to 18 playgrounds being built by Humana and KaBOOM! across the United States, a playground will also be built in Charlotte, N.C. prior to the 2012 Democratic National Convention in September.

Writer: Alexis Quinn Chamberlain
Source: Kim Headland, V.M. Ybor Neighborhood Association

Kimley Horn Moves To Downtown Tampa, Goes Green

Providing a wide-range of consulting services for roadways, bridges, traffic signals, airports, land developments and landscape architecture, Kimley-Horn and Associates (KHA) recently celebrated the opening of its new office in downtown Tampa.

With 18 offices and more than 400 employees in Florida, the nationally-recognized Raleigh, N.C.-based firm opened their first office in Tampa in 1978. Making the move to 655 N. Franklin St. in downtown Tampa, KHA's new 7,100-square-foot office currently houses 23 employees.

“The combination of the location of some of the staff's homes, client locations and professional relationships made being in a more central location like the downtown area a strong contender for places to look for new office spaces,” says KHA Director of Communications Julie Beauvais.

According to Beauvais, the firm considered locations in downtown and Ybor City before deciding on the North Franklin Street space, working with Gensler Architects on interior design and Solutions General Contractors for the space build-out.

Since the move, KHA has taken pride in significantly reducing their carbon footprint: Thanks to the convenience of the downtown location, approximately 25 percent of the staff bike to work and lunch every week. Prior to the move, Beauvais says they found the majority of their staff driving more than 10 miles daily to get to work alone.

“The office morale has never been higher,” says David Walthall, KHA downtown office leader. “The work environment helped the collaboration between an already close group of co-workers, giving folks variety in their daily routine with all that downtown has to offer during work and after work hours -- hardly anyone gets in their car to drive to lunch."

Writer: Alexis Quinn Chamberlain
Source: Julie Beauvais & David Walthall, KHA

Clearwater Improves Water At Prospect Lake Park

Construction recently began on an improvement project on Clearwater's Prospect Lake Park.

Located in downtown Clearwater at Prospect Avenue and Franklin Street, the approximately $800,000 project is designed to  improve the water quality of Prospect Lake, which serves as a regional stormwater pond for an area of the downtown district; the pond ultimately discharges into Clearwater Harbor.

According to City of Clearwater Engineering Department Environmental Specialist Sarah Josuns, sediment has built up in Prospect Lake. Using a dredge to remove the sediment, the lake will also be expanded to the south; various wetland plants will also be added to the south end of the pond.

“With the expansion of the lake, stormwater will have additional detention time while the new littoral shelf with wetland plants will have an opportunity to absorb nutrients,” Josuns says. “Stormwater is directed to this lake so many properties in the area do not need to have their own pond.”

Funded by stormwater utility fees, the sediment removal phase is already underway and is expected to be complete by early December 2012. The second phase including pond expansion and wetland plantings will begin in early 2013. Phase two is slated to take about six months, with completion planned for July 2013.

Writer: Alexis Quinn Chamberlain
Source: Sarah Josuns, City of Clearwater

New Park, Improvements Planned For St. Pete

St. Petersburg residents and outdoors lovers are in for a treat: The City is planning a new park for the area.

In the early stages of the planning process, the new $1.6 million park is being developed for the vacated Rio Vista Elementary School site at 6th Street and 83rd Avenue N.E. in St. Pete; a public meeting was held on July 25th, discussing conceptual plans for the proposed Rio Vista Park.

“It has long been recognized that northeast St. Petersburg is lacking in recreational opportunities,” says City Parks and Field Operations Superintendent Phil Whitehouse. “The Parks and Recreation Department tries to look at service levels in all areas of the City to provide equal opportunities for recreation. This park will provide an avenue for recreation where one does not currently exist.”

Funded by Weeki-Wachee funds that were set aside for recreational projects, Whitehouse says a large portion of the budget wil go toward the demolition of the school that currently sites on the park site.

The City is currently also working on an approximately $700,000 master/management plan addressing concerns at Maximo Park at 34th Street South and Pinellas Point Drive. Funded by Penny for Pinellas and the Florida Boating Improvement Program, Maximo is expected to include renovated boat ramps, restrooms, new educational signage and native plantings upon completion.

Writer: Alexis Quinn Chamberlain
Source: Phil Whitehouse, City of St. Pete
185 environment Articles | Page: | Show All
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