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St. Pete College invests in St. Peterburg's midtown

The future looks brighter for the mid-town area of downtown St. Petersburg with the purchase of two large buildings by St. Petersburg College (SPC). The $1.2 million investment has been years in the making, and aims to help reinvigorate the struggling neighborhood by providing scholarships and economic opportunity to public housing residents.

“The purchases will help stabilize the neighborhood,” says Bill Law, President of SPC since 2010.

Law intends to turn both structures into community resources for the area, which is seeing a rebirth of economic activity. One of the buildings, currently known as the Cecil B. Keene Center for Achievement, is a 10,556-square-foot structure located at 22nd Street South; the other an 11,136-square-foot gymnasium at 1201 22nd Street South. Both were previously owned by the St. Petersburg Housing Authority.

As for plans for the future of the two buildings, that is still to be decided.

“People in mid-town have been waiting to get this done, so we can take the next steps,” says Law. “SPC will revisit the community dialogues it's been having with the midtown community. Our goal is to present our Board of Trustees with new ideas on next steps to support the community within the next 60 to 90 days.”

As part of the agreement to purchase the buildings from the St. Petersburg Housing Authority, SPC agreed to provide five students from public housing with $1,000 scholarships each per year for 30 years to enroll at SPC. The college also agreed to provide 10 $250 textbook scholarships per year for 30 years and five surplus computers per year for 30 years to public housing residents enrolled at SPC.

Reed at ENCORE! Tampa is completed, fully occupied

The Reed at ENCORE! Tampa, a new senior building between downtown Tampa and Ybor City, is now complete and fully occupied. 
The Reed is part of a larger designed community encompassing 28 acres and expected to cover 12 city blocks. Plans include a variety of housing for all ages, including low income as well as market rate rentals and sales. 
Though the near $30-million Reed at ENCORE building already houses more than 150 seniors, there are some final touches to be completed.
“There is a design element remaining to be installed, the maestro’s baton, which is a large public art element, which will grace the front entry way of the building,” says Leroy Moore, COO for the Tampa Housing Authority.
According to Moore, the Reed building has special significance to the area.
“Reed is our second senior building and the third building overall to open at ENCORE,” he says. ‘The building is named after Essie Mae Reed, a local pioneer in women’s rights and public housing, and Tampa’s first black female to qualify to run for city council.”
To honor the late-Essie Mae Reed, a bust was revealed at the ribbon cutting, which was attended by U.S. Congresswoman Kathy Castor and Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn. During the event, Castor read a proclamation she read on the floor of Congress honoring Ms. Reed several years ago. The mayor shared memories of times he spent with the pioneer. The Reed family shared their emotional comments about how profoundly honored they feel to have such a remembrance of their family member.

BayCare signs deal to acquire Bartow Regional Medical

BayCare Health System signed an agreement in mid-October to acquire Bartow Regional Medical Center. The 72-bed Bartow facility and its related physician clinics and outpatient care facilities are currently owned by the for-profit Community Health Systems.

The transaction, which is expected to close by the end of the year, will give Clearwater-based BayCare its second hospital in Polk County.

“Winter Haven Hospital, which was established in 1926, integrated with Baycare on August 30, 2013," says Amy Lovett of BayCare Health System. “This agreement provides us the opportunity to have a second hospital in Polk County, which helps us anchor other health services needed by this large and growing county.”

 While Lovett would not go into detail about what kind of financial impact this transaction will have on BayCare, according to a news release from the healthcare organization, connecting Bartow Regional Medical Center with Winter Haven Hospital and South Florida Baptist Hospital in Plant City, a triad of BayCare hospitals offer a continuum of broader community health services in Eastern Hillsborough and Polk County.

BayCare currently has 13 hospitals and hundreds of physician clinics and outpatient care facilities throughout the Tampa Bay and central Florida regions. Founded in 1997, with 23,600 employees, the not-for-profit healthcare system runs local hospitals including Morton Plant in Clearwater, Morton Plant North Bay in New Port Richey, St. Anthony’s in St. Petersburg, St. Joseph’s in Tampa, St. Joseph’s North in Lutz, St. Joseph’s South in Riverview, Mease Dunedin and Mease Countryside near Safety Harbor. 

Moving to Tampa: New luxury apartments coming to Westshore

The Westshore area of Tampa, long known as a thriving business district, continues to grow as a residential community with the addition of The Westly, a new luxury apartment complex under construction. The 262-unit apartment complex joins other new developments including Grady Square and the Crescent, also under construction.

The Westly is a multimillion dollar project that the Framework Group is developing, and was formerly known as the 4310 Spruce project. The decision to build a complex on Spruce was a strategic one based on serving the needs of the existing Westshore area.

“We chose to build in Westshore because we wanted to target young professionals, and Westshore has the largest employment base in the Tampa region,” Framework President Phillip Smith says. “We also liked the proximity to retail and restaurants in the area.”  

Apartments range from approximately 600-square-feet for a studio to over 1,600-square-feet for a three-bedroom. Smith says what sets this project apart from other developments is the amenities.

“Apartments on the top floor feature ten-foot-high ceilings, each unit has high-end appliances, the bathrooms feature rain head showers, everything is high-end,” he says.

He goes on to say that the complex will also feature a clubhouse with a sauna and massage rooms, a pool and courtyards, and a gaming room with a golf simulator, multiple televisions, putting green, pool table and casual seating.

Smith, who received his master’s degree from Harvard and bachelor’s degree from Auburn, has several other projects in the works including a 21-story building on Harbour Island and a 220-unit development in downtown Sarasota.

Plans call for the first units at The Westly to be available in June of 2016.

Plans call for 800 new homes in west Hillsborough River neighborhood

More homes are being added to the plans for the West River redevelopment project being designed by the Tampa Housing Authority. Another 800 homes are now envisioned as part of the 1,600 already included in the $500 million redevelopment project.

The West River redevelopment project is part of the city of Tampa’s plans to transform a 194 acres of land along the Hillsborough River into a mixed-income neighborhood. The plan to add 800 new homes was made after re-evaluating the project.
After a more complete market study of the urban area affected, "it just made sense to add these additional homes,” says Leroy Moore, COO for the Tampa Housing Authority.  “The opportunity was there, and the market study showed that with the higher number of units being there, the market would support it.”

With the new plan, the 2,400 homes will be mixed-use, but also mixed-income meaning there will be a combination of public housing and market-rate units.

“This is a mixed-income project,” Moore says. “By mixed-income we mean housing that is affordable to persons below 80-percent area medium income being housed in the same building with units that are at market rent as well, so that the diversity of income is all within one building.”

As for when the units will be ready, Moore says it could take time depending on when funding comes through.

“It will be a phase development, which could mean it would be five to 10 years before the units are complete,” he says. “But we could have buildings starting as early as late next year. We are pursuing funding this year to try to get this project underway as soon as possible.”

T.J.Maxx, new restaurants sprouting up in south Tampa

New restaurants and a popular discount retailer are moving into the South Tampa neighborhoods of Palma Ceia and SOHO/ Courier City.

After months of construction and speculation about what was going into the former Eckerd Drug store space on Henderson Boulevard, T.J. Maxx has announced it will be going into the shopping center between Fresh Market and First Watch. The 26,000-square-feet will be the discount clothing store's 10th location in the Tampa Bay area, but the first in south Tampa.

Its main competition for retail shoppers looking for discounted brand name clothing will likely be the stores already occupying Britton Plaza, about three miles south at Dale Mabry Highway and Euclid Avenue. Stores in Britton Plaza include Marshall's, Bealls Outlet, Burlington Coat Factory and the ever-popular Stein Mart. (Publix is currently rebuilding its space in Britton Plaza.)

Food town opeings

For foodies, the selection of restaurants in South Tampa continues to grow, with new concepts opening in new or renovated spaces nearly every week. Here are just a few of the restaurants that are creating buzz:

Four Rivers Smokehouse

With the successful launch of its location in Carrollwood, Four Rivers Smokehouse, will be coming to south Tampa later this year. Truly a 'home cooked'-inspired restaurant, Four Rivers got its start in the owner's garage after a fundraising cookout to support a family who had lost their young daughter to cancer. The barbecued food the owner made that day was very well received, so he opened up the Carrollwood restaurant and today proceeds still go to the 'Barbecue Ministry.”

Food at Four Rivers includes sandwiches, ribs, smoked chicken and brisket. The new restaurant will be located at the corner of Swann and MacDill Avenues, and is expected to open this fall.

Craft A'Fare Social Kitchen / Cask

Co-owned by Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver Vincent Jackson, Craft A'Fare Social Kitchen, or just Cask as locals call it, is a comfort food haven with cornmeal crusted snapper, cider braised pork with beer battered onions as well as shrimp and grits, this restaurant is southern food meets chic fare.

Cask recently opened and provides lunch and dinner, with brunch on Sundays. You can experience Cask at 208 South Howard Ave.

Acropolis Greek Taverna

If you are looking for something other than American fare, Acropolis Greek Taverna south Tampa will be opening soon. This Greek restaurant with locations in Ybor, New Tampa, St. Petersburg and Riverview, will be opening a south Tampa location this fall. Take your tastebuds on a journey at Acropolis by trying their ouzo mussels, octopus appetizer or Greek lamb chops.

Acropolis Greek Taverna will be located at 3023 West Kennedy Boulevard.

“I believe south Tampa has become a foodie paradise,” says Kelly Flannery, president and CEO of the south Tampa Chamber of Commerce. “There is a great selection to choose from with all these new restaurants, and its a great walkable community right here in the middle of south Tampa.”

Unique theater prepares to open in West Tampa

West Tampa is experiencing a great amount of change as development plans by the city are underway, and in response to all the change, a new theater company is moving into the neighborhood to offer a place of peace, thoughtfulness and innovation.

The Space at 2106 Main, an old restaurant, is being revitalized into a theater that will house performances from band and vocal representations to one-person shows to full-blown Broadway acts. The theater company’s goal is to bring a variety of art to the area.

Before becoming executive artistic director for The Space at 2106 Main, Jared O’Roark, was working with youth for over a decade at Ruth Eckerd Hall. He even gained national attention for his work in the documentary Project: Shattered Silence, which won several awards and even a Emmy nomination.

“After working at Ruth Eckerd Hall for 14 years, the owner of The Space at 2106 Main, Robert Morris, came to me and told me about this building, and when we went inside, he asked me if I saw potential for a theater, and I said, 'yes'.”

O’Roark goes on to say that the theater will be immersive, meaning actors and acts will be moving around the whole theater, even in the audience, unlike traditional theater that all takes place on a stage.

“Everything in the room can move, so every time you walk in the room it should look different,” he says. “The chairs can move, tables can move, the booths can move, so immersive also means whatever the director has in mind, he can do without being tied down.”

O’Roark says this project is also important to him due to the fact that he is able to work with a diverse group of people in a diverse community.

“We are really pushing diversity, and we are not just saying it, the three of us at the top are all minorities. Robert, the owner is Lebanese, I myself am gay, and Erica Sutherlan, the managing artistic director is African-American. We want to not only present art for people outside the community, but we want to do stuff that involves the community. We want people in the community to know that we are not keeping them at arm’s length. This is their place too. This is a diverse community, and we welcome that diversity.”

The Space at 2016 Main will open its doors in September, for a list of upcoming shows check out their Facebook page for updates.

Construction begins on redesign of historic downtown Tampa park

Historical culture meets the future at the new Perry Harvey Park being constructed near ENCORE! Tampa just north of downtown at the intersection of Harrison Street and Central Avenue.

The $6.95 million project is being funded through a federal Choice Neighborhood Grant obtained by the Tampa Housing Authority for redeveloping the neighborhood.

“The $30 million dollar choice neighborhood implementation grant included a $2 million allocation for the renovation of Perry Harvey Park because the neighborhood lacked adequate recreational amenities to support the planned ENCORE! and surrounding community,” says LeRoy Moore, COO for the Tampa Housing Authority. “Parks and recreational amenities are essential to good community planning and promote wellness, cultural awareness and community building.”
The park's design celebrates the history of Central Avenue and its culture. The area was settled after the Civil War, when freed slaves were relocated to an area northeast of downtown Tampa. As time went on, the area became a successful African- American residential and business community. Many legendary artists, including Ray Charles, Cab Calloway, Ella Fitzgerald and James Brown, were drawn there to perform to growing audiences.

“After the public participation process of three public meetings, an advisory committee of community leaders was appointed to develop the program for park elements to ensure the park reflected the historical culture,” says Brad Suder, Superintendent in the city of Tampa’s planning design natural resources division. “This included granddaughters of Perry Harvey, Sr. and descendants of business leaders who grew up in the community. The idea was to capture important milestones, events and facts. The city selected four different artists to showcase the cultural history in different parts of the park, including a southern gateway into the park, a leaders row, a history walk and a statue of Perry Harvey, Sr.”

In addition to the artwork, the park will feature an interactive fountain, concert/festival space, improvements to the basketball courts, picnic shelters and a skate park.

Construction on the park is expected to be completed in winter 2016.

Urbanism on Tap open mic event: Let's talk about role of arts in Tampa's urban scene

Tampa's Urban Charrette and the Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU) Tampa Bay will host Urbanism on Tap at the Independent Bar and Cafe, 5016 N Florida Ave., in Tampa on July 14 starting at 5:30 p.m. 

Urbanism on Tap is a recurring open mic event focused on generating constructive conversations within the community about current ideas and trends that are shaping our city.

Every event is open to the public, and moderators and attendees are invited to share their views and stories related to the topic of the day. The intention of the event is to generate a lively exchange of ideas, which will enhance our ability to make Tampa a more livable city.

The July event is Urbanism on Tap's final discussion in the Arts and Urbanism series, which explores the various connections between the urban environment of Tampa and urban design, artists and art organizations.  

“Community through Art, Art through Community” will focus on how art can be used to strengthen communities and how communities can in turn support artists and their work. To engage with these topics, participants will look at case studies from around the nation to discuss how other communities are handling these issues. 

Additionally, local artists and arts organization representatives will be invited to the event to share insights on how these issues are playing out in the Tampa area. 

In what ways does an urban arts scene create vibrancy in a place and how can it actively engage with the general public? Should governments and citizens ensure a place in the community for artists and arts organizations, and what are the best methods used to retain artists? What support do artists need to thrive? The audience and invitees will have the opportunity to talk about these questions and more.
The event organizers -- the Urban Charrette and CNU Tampa Bay -- encourage people to share their opinions on this topic by visiting Urbanism on Tap’s online Facebook page before and after the event. 

Venue: Independent Bar and Café, 5016 N Florida Ave, Tampa, 33603
Date and Time: July 14, 2015, from 5:30 to – 7 p.m.

BLUE Ocean Film Festival opens new headquarters in St. Pete

As waves lap the Gulf of Mexico shoreline less than two miles away, the BLUE Ocean Film Festival and Conservation Summit opens its new global headquarters in the heart of St. Pete. The main office at 646 2nd Ave. S. is already abuzz with activities surrounding preparations for the city to host the 2016 BLUE Ocean Film Festival.

The annual festival sheds light on problems plaguing the world's oceans and solutions for conservation by showcasing the best in ocean filmmaking and scientific research. The seven-day event moved to St. Petersburg in 2014 from Monterey CA, will be hosted by the government of Prince Albert II in Monaco in November 2015 and then will return to St. Pete in November 2016.

The nonprofit works year-round to educate people on the importance of ocean life and conservation. From summits and conferences to workshops and educational outreach programs, the organization tries to teach as many populations as possible.

“It’s always been a part of our long-term strategy to use film as a tool to raise awareness,” says Debbie Kinder, CEO and co-Founder of BLUE Ocean. “We have always wanted to have workshops, activities and mentoring to show that conservation work is a great career option.”

The organization’s “Blue on Tour” program travels the world showcasing its films and engaging conversations on the global value of the oceans.

“We need one strong home base and St. Pete is it,” Kinder says. “We would love for BLUE to be associated with St. Pete the way that Sundance is associated with Park City.”

The 6,000-square-foot headquarters that Kinder refers to as ''home base'' is being leased, though the nonprofit is getting a temporary break on rent.

“There is a long-term lease, however, early on there are no rent payments due,” says Robert Glaser, President and CEO of Smith and Associates. Glaser did minor renovations on the property, although he says the building was in excellent shape and did not need much done. Long-term, when the festival is more financially sound, he anticipates collecting rent for use of the building.

Old Seminole Heights attracts innovative restaurants, shops

More new creative shops and restaurants are moving into the Old Seminole Heights neighborhood of Tampa.

“I can tell you a lot of young people are moving to this neighborhood,” says Debi Johnson, President of the Old Seminole Heights Neighborhood Association. “The younger population wants the breweries and restaurants to come in, and the establishments do because they know it is good for business.”

Some of the newer establishments to open in Old Seminole Heights over the last year or so include a pizza and burger joint called Hampton Station, an upscale twist on comfort food restaurant known as Fodder & Shine, The Bourgeois Pig and Red Star Rock Bar.

One of the most talked about lately restaurants coming to the neighborhood is Ichicoro, a Japanese noodle soup restaurant, otherwise known as Ramen Ya.

“We are Tampa Bay’s first Ramen Ya restaurant,” says Noel Cruz, owner of Ichicoro, which will be situated at 5229 North Florida Avenue.

While restaurants like Ichicoro are widely popular in other cities, including New York, where Cruz owns another Ramen Ya restaurant, Old Seminole Heights gets to boast that their neighborhood was chosen for the restaurant’s location, which opens in June.

Another innovative concept coming to the neighborhood is the Jug & Bottle Dept. located at 6201 N. Florida Ave. It's a specialty store that will feature coffees, teas, gourmet food items, fresh flowers and cigars, among other specialty items. What will set this store apart from the rest is its world class beer and wine, says co-Owner Veronica Danko, who owns The Independent Bar and Café.

“Over the years, my staff, friends and customers have all discussed the fact that the neighborhood needs a specialty retail store,” Danko says. “The Independent does not have a package license, so a couple of us decided to open the store ourselves, and use our knowledge and passion for beer and wine to make it work.  We are very excited about the project and cannot wait to get it open next month (June).”

3 new shops opening in downtown Tampa

As downtown Tampa grows as a work-live-play environment, new residential and commercial properties will soon include three new shops designed to take care of the personal needs of residents, workers and visitors. 

Pearl Salon

Pearl Salon is aiming to be an oasis for clients with 4,200 square feet in Park Tower at 400 North Tampa Street. The salon will offer nail care, waxing, eyelash extensions and massages as well as a blow dry bar for professionals on the run.

The owner of Pearl Salon, Kim Nguyen, an entrepreneur from Miami, strategically picked the downtown location.

“There are so many workers in the downtown area, as well as the University of Tampa, however, there is currently nowhere for people to get their beauty treatments done,” she says.

The $700,000 investment will create at least 25 jobs according to Nguyen.  It is scheduled to open in early June.

Uncommon Finds

Uncommon Finds is a niche perfume storefront that enables customers to discover unique scents.

“Niche perfumes are a growing product,” says owner Rob Atkins, a self-acclaimed ‘scent junkie.’

"They are much different from your typical perfume, which only has one layer of scent; ours has three, so if you put some on in the morning you should still smell it in the evening. Also we use essential oils in our product, as opposed to synthetic ingredients found in other perfumes, therefore those who have allergies can wear our products“

The store's 300 square feet of space will be located within Studio K, 406 N. Morgan St.

Uncommon Finds is scheduled to open in mid-June.

Doxa Design Lab and Gallery

Doxa Design Lab and Gallery is approximately 500 square feet of interior design services.

“We are offering full interior design services, fine art as well as custom upholstery, vintage furnishings home accents, lighting, art and design books, textiles and industrial designs created by renowned architects and product designers,” says Jaime Rogers, Senior Partner of Doxa. “We offer products for as little as $30, or as much as $20,000.”

Doxa’s opening will create jobs including a general manager, part-time bookkeeper and part-time design assistant.

The Gallery will be located at the base of SkyPoint, 777 North Ashley Drive. It also is expected to open in June.

Redevelopment plan for West Tampa looks to brighter future

In the heart of the historic West Tampa neighborhood, residents, business owners and community leaders congregated together on two separate nights in April to discuss the redevelopment plan the city has put forth.

Sitting in fold-out chairs facing a PowerPoint presentation in the MLK Community Center on Oregon Avenue, the city laid out its proposal for revitalizing the traditionally lower income, working class neighborhood. The new community redevelopment area (CRA) in west Tampa encompasses the west side of the Hillsborough River to Armenia Avenue on the west, up to Columbus Drive to the north and Kennedy Boulevard to the south.

While this part of Tampa has a rich history, city planners believe that updates need to be made. According to one study, 56 percent of the roads in the area are in need of improvement, 33 percent of roadways have a pavement condition index of "failed,'' more than 50 percent of housing units were constructed before 1959, and more than 60 percent of the area lacks sidewalks.

"I think the people that live here, and do business in west Tampa have waited a very long time to catch up with some of the other areas that have been redeveloped,'' says Jeanette Fenton, Urban Development Manager for the city of Tampa.

The CRA includes provisions for numerous tasks including new affordable housing, façade and building improvements, pedestrian access, road improvements, as well as beautification projects.

Those in attendance at meetings held on April 14th and 30th were able to give feedback and input to the city as to what they would like to see happen in their community as this process moves forward. It was explained by Fenton that the next step in the process includes her team putting together a strategic action plan for approval, including input from the community.

As for the cost of this project, that is undetermined at this time.

"We have not run the revenue projections yet,'' Fenton says. "That will be the next step once the plan is approved, then there will be an analysis of all the taxes of the property and what the revenue will be.''

The deadline for the Urban Development team to present its strategic action plan is July 1st.  

Foodie alert: 5 new restaurants open on 4th Street in St. Pete

If your palette is hungry for a new taste, head down to 4th Street in St. Petersburg, where five new and globally diverse restaurants have opened since February.
Experience Thai food at JusThai, a new juice bar called Gush Juice, diving deep for sushi at Hook’s and adding some spice at Pericos if you’re in the mood for Mexican food — seemingly something for everyone.
Or sit down at one of the more innovative restaurants to open in the Tampa Bay area, PieTopia, known for their “meter pizzas.’’ Taking over the 2,500-square-feet location that used to house World of Beer, this “Farm-to-table’’ restaurant is not your typical pizzeria. 

“We have very high quality pizzas made with double zero flour, so it is ultra refined with no GMOs and no preservatives,’’ says Edward Ehlers, GM of PieTopia. “We also have 35 wine selections; many of them are imported from Italy, and a good selection of organic wines.’’

While the pizza is good for the body, you can also get a good bit of it. The restaurant’s most notable pizza, the “Meter Pizza,’’ feeds anywhere from eight to 10 people according to Ehlers and starts at $15. 

“We do have a meter pizza that is $125, which includes caviar as a topping.’’

Several more restaurants are set to open over the next few months on 4th Street; and Pietopia’s owner Joe DiBartolo says the location is a great spot for his investment.
“The location is strategically placed,’’ he says. “It’s easy to get to; Trader Joe's and The Fresh Market are up the street, which has a similar clientele that is looking for organic options, which we provide.’’
From now until the end of April, the restaurant will be hosting a grand opening celebration. As part of the celebration, Ehlers says any two-guest party that spends at least $25 will be entitled to a complimentary bottle of imported organic wine as well as an antipasto sampler platter of imported meat, cheese and farm fresh vegetables. 

Besito Mexican restaurant opens in Westshore, Tampa

The new Besito Restaurant in the Westshore neighborhood of Tampa adds spice to the district. As you walk around restaurant row at Westshore Plaza, you will see a new kid is on the block, one that packs a refined and savory punch.
Besito, which is located in the 7,500-square-feet space vacated by The Palm steakhouse, opened its doors to the public in April. According to owner John Tunney, his restaurant is the perfect urban joint for locals.

“The people of Tampa enjoy dining, they go out a lot, they understand food, they understand recipes, they understand cocktails, all in all they’re foodies,’’ he says. “So we are giving them what they want. Our cuisine is very authentic from central and southern Mexico. When you come here, you will have a culinary experience, you will feel like you are in Mexico.’’

The menu offers authentic recipes that include steak, chicken and seafood, guacamole made tableside, and a variety of cocktails, not to mention 75 different types of tequila. Tunney says what sets his restaurant apart from others is the flavors found in the food.
“We balance the flavors so the food is not too spicy,’’ says Joe Mugenski, Executive Chef at Besito

“The flavors are incredible,’’ adds Alan Reynolds, also Executive Chef. “Everything is made from scratch every day.’’

Beyond the food, Tunney points out the décor of the restaurant also adds to the experience. 

“The décor is inspired by my own travels in Mexico,’’ he says. “The masks we have over the lighting pieces around the walls are actually made after a mask I found on a beach during one of my trips to Mexico. Every detail, everything you see, there is a reason for it.’’
Besito is located at Westshore Plaza across from Mitchell’s Fish Market in the space once occupied by The Palm. 
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