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A peak inside: Safety Harbor Art & Music Center opens in northern Pinellas County

The Safety Harbor home of artists Todd Ramquist and Kiaralinda is hard to miss.

Some know the brightly painted and tiled cottage surrounded by yard sculptures as Whimzeyland. Others affectionately refer to it as “the bowling ball house” because of the rows of decorated bowling balls that adorn the home’s yard. For many, it’s a local landmark, and listed on numerous “roadside attraction” websites.

The couple also used their home to bring the arts to their community in other ways, hosting house concerts and local artists. As this grew, Kiaralinda realized they’d eventually need a bigger venue. “When you have 170 people in your gazebo and in your front yard listening to music, it’s kind of time to move it somewhere else,” she says.

Now, after five years of planning, raising funds and construction, their new venue, the Safety Harbor Art & Music Center (SHAM), has opened in the city’s downtown, at 706 Second St. N. The artistic hub for northern Pinellas County opened its doors over Thanksgiving weekend with a three-day celebration, SHAMsgiving. They followed this up with a 12 Days of Christmas holiday event. 

“It’s pretty much a dream come true,” Kiaralinda says. The new venue is a larger-scale version of their home. “There’s art everywhere.”

SHAMc, a 501(c)3 nonprofit, became a possibility for the couple when they won a $50,000 Pepsi Refresh Grant in 2011. Since the initial Pepsi grant, the project has been funded by a mix of donations, fundraisers and grants from the city. The plan was to create a center dedicated to all facets of the arts -- visual arts, music, literature, performing arts -- which is exactly what the venue is, Kiaralinda says. “We’re filling the calendar faster than we ever imagined we would, ever since we opened the doors,” she adds. 

Laura Kepner, founder of the Safety Harbor Writers & Poets, which now hosts its monthly open mics at SHAMc, says the local arts scene wouldn’t be what it is without Kiaralinda and Ramquist. 

“They support me with the open mic,” she says. “The really cool thing about [them] is if you want to do something with your art, whatever your art is, they’re probably going to cheer you on and say, how can we work together?”

The SHAM project transformed the Rigsby House, “a woodsy building” on the property when they purchased it, Kiaralinda says. “The old house was saved and resurrected. We did what we could to keep that alive.”

The original home is now called the ARTery, a space for workshops and to showcase local artwork. They also built a new two-story building called the ODDitorium, where the larger performances and events will take place.

Now, the folks behind SHAMc are planning their annual Safety Harbor SongFest, which is set for April 1 at Waterfront Park. The two-day music festival, which will feature artists including Magic Giant, Rising Appalachia, Charlie Mars and Joe Craven this year, will serve as a fundraiser for the new arts center.

Kiaralinda says SHAMc has a deep volunteer base of about 300 or so. “It’s been a really, really good ride, and we’ve had a lot of support,” she says, despite delays in funding and construction.

Though she and Ramquist have long been a staple of the Safety Harbor arts scene, she’s amazed by the response she’s received since SHAMc opened. “It’s crazy how many people walk through here and want to do things,” she says.

St. Petersburg’s Station House undergoes next phase in urban development

Station House, downtown St. Petersburg’s unique co-working space, restaurant and event venue, is undergoing the next phase in development with plans to update the main facility and expand the concept to an additional location, says Founder and Proprietor Steve Gianfilippo.

“It’s part of a planned phased-in upgrade,” says Gianfilippo. “I like to let our customers give us feedback about where we can make improvements. We’ve been listening and now we’re ready to move forward. It’s an evolving process.”

Station House opened in 2014 after extension renovations to its historic 100-year-old location that once housed a fire station, then hotel and train station. The five-story venue now includes a first-floor restaurant and bar; communal and co-working space for lease anywhere from a day to long-term; small private office suites; event meeting rooms and a rooftop garden. Memberships at various levels are offered.

Construction begins this month (January 2017) on a number of planned upgrades to the venue. First on the list is a shaded pergola and landscaping for the rooftop garden.

“We needed to provide some protection from the elements and a little shade to make it more comfortable, especially in the summer,” says Gianfilippo. The rooftop space can accommodate private parties, community events and fitness activities like the popular yoga classes that are held there.

The restaurant and co-working spaces, as well as the building’s front entrance, will also be enhanced.

While the restaurant will remain in the same location, the entry will move to the front of the building to make it more visible and to improve traffic flow, as well as giving it a higher profile, Gianfilippo says. The restaurant’s interior will have an overhaul in concept, layout and design.  

“It’s all part of a plan to raise the profile of the restaurant, improve entry to the building and create better synergy between the various elements we offer at Station House,” says Gianfilippo. “It’s preliminary right now, but some of the plans under consideration include extensive landscaping and a mural at the front entrance with some sort of 3D mapping experience.”

The popular communal co-working space, which features a striking black-and-white tile floor, high-top tables and meeting rooms set up as living rooms, will also have a few added “fun” elements like a ping pong table and virtual gaming.

Station House will also be expanding into the Central Arts District. Last August, Gianfilippo purchased another historic property -- the Green-Richman Arcade, located at 689 Central Avenue. The 1920-era building is on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.

Station House members will be able to use the new venue, which is currently being branded as the Station House Arcade.  Gianfilippo says he expects renovations on the arcade to be complete by the end of January.  

The historic façade of the building will remain but a renovation of the interior is planned with offices, common areas, conference rooms, and possibly an interior garden. The property, which is near the Morean Arts Center, Chihuly Collection and Central Avenue boutiques and galleries, will reflect the eclectic creative arts culture in that part of downtown, says Gianfilippo.  

“This is a growing area and we got in just in the nick of time,” he says. “It’s a cool, hip area that is quickly developing.”

Construction on the restaurant at the main facility is projected to be completed by spring or summer of 2017.

Bryan Glazer Family Jewish Community Center now open in Tampa

On Dec. 8, 1941, the day after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Fort Homer W. Hesterly Armory was inaugurated at 522 N. Howard Ave. in Tampa.
 
Exactly 75 years later, the building was re-opened as the Bryan Glazer Family Jewish Community Center with more than 100,000 square feet of community space.
 
"My heart is racing," says Jack Ross, Executive Director, on Wednesday, Dec. 7, the eve of the ribbon cutting and grand opening ceremony.
 
For him, the state-of-the-art facility represents "five years of intense collaboration with some of the best creative, intellectual and professional people," he's ever worked with. It's named for Bryan Glazer, co-chairman of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, who pledged $4 million to the project. The Florida Legislature and Gov. Rick Scott put in more than $7 million. Hillsborough County contributed $1.3 million. The entire project cost a total of $30 million.
 
Over the last three-quarters of a century, the property has served as a camp site of the Rough Riders (the 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry Regiment raised in 1898 for the Spanish-American War); the site of an Elvis Presley performance; speeches by Martin Luther King Jr. and John F. Kennedy; and one of the original venues for professional wrestling, Ross says.
 
"But even more than that, you also have the Tampa history," he adds. "You have thousands of people who attended graduations, weddings, cotillions, convention meetings. So, we as an organization have the privilege of not only restoring a landmark property, but we had the opportunity to repurpose the facility and relaunch it into a new bright future."
 
The building is divided into a member section on the west side and a non-member section on the east side.
 
The member side houses a more than 50,000-square-foot fitness and aquatic center, known as the Diane and Leon Mezrah Family Aquatic Center. There's a multisport gymnasium and indoor track, yoga, spin, Pilates, and Group Ex classes. Anyone can become a member, and fees range from $49-$159, Ross says.
 
The non-member section houses the Roberta M. Golding Center for the Visual Arts, a premier fine arts center operated by the City of Tampa in conjunction with the Tampa Museum of Art in partnership with the Hillsborough County Board of Commissioners. There's also a large event space, a social service center operated by Tampa Jewish Family Services, and the Florida-Israel Business Accelerator.
 
The accelerator is a landing pad for Israeli high-tech companies who want to launch in the United States, Ross explains. It assists these companies by aligning them with corporate strategic partners and getting their products ready for the U.S. market.
 
Anyone can use the event space for meetings, weddings, banquets and other occasions.
 
"Flexibility and versatility was the mantra in developing the whole building," Ross says.
 
Furthermore, a pre-school will be added to the property, although details of this second phase of the project are still in the works.
 
Ross says the importance of the center is three-fold. It revived and repurposed a historic landmark; it will have injected $30 million into the local community and hundreds of jobs by the time both phases are complete; and it’s a gathering spot for all faiths, creeds and religions.
 
"We are building community at a time when our country seems divided," he explains. "This is the great communal gathering spot. This is a place to come to gather and grow."

New stores, pop-up shops open at Hyde Park Village in Tampa

Hyde Park Village is hoppin'.
 
With construction taking shape and new stores moving in, the last few months have been busy for the area, and it doesn't look like things are slowing down for the WS Development property.
 
On Oct. 25, Scout & Molly's, a national women's clothing, jewelry and accessories boutique, opened at 1603 W. Snow Circle. The 1,239-square-foot shop carries something for every woman, from young professionals to savvy seniors. Stylists are also available to help each customer find what's right for them.
 
Owner Linda Crawford says she wanted to open Tampa's first Scout & Molly's franchise because she was attracted to the brand's fashions and accessories, which allow every woman to create a look that suits her individual tastes.
 
In August, three new businesses opened in the Village: Suitsupply, vineyard vines and Goody Goody.
 
Suitsupply, a European men's brand known for their stylish suits in tailored fits, set up shop at 1525 W. Swann Ave. on Aug. 26.
 
Also on Aug. 26, vineyard vines, a preppy lifestyle clothing and accessory brand for men, women and children, opened at 1623 W. Snow Ave.
 
And Goody Goody, the iconic Tampa hamburger restaurant reinvented by Richard Gonzmart of the Columbia Restaurant Group, began welcoming diners on Aug. 23 at 1601 W. Swann Ave.
 
Permanent stores and restaurants aren't the only ones setting up shop. WS Development, a national retail development firm that began revitalizing the area in 2013, says temporary retailers are also part of its vision.

"Hyde Park Village is always looking for the unique specialty shop that offers a gift or snack or a pop of color to brighten our shoppers' experience," says Susan Martin, GM of the property. "That is why we started The Fling POP Up shop. This space allows the small business person to try out retail and bring their product to new customers."
 
Toffee to Go was the area's first pop-up shop last year, and it's returning for this year's holiday season. The treat shop, which is based in South Tampa, is scheduled to be open Nov. 18-Dec. 26. Martin says more details about this year's Toffee to Go pop-up shop will be released this week.
 
Florist Fire, based in Seminole Heights, first had a pop-up shop at 716 E. Village Circle in February. And Dark Cycle Clothing, an alternative T-shirt company, opened Sept. 23 at 1607 W. Snow Ave. Both have extended their terms at Hyde Park Village. Florist Fire will be open through June 2017, and Dark Cycle will have its shop through Dec. 31.
 
HICO is another pop-up shop at the Village. The Colombian swimwear and lingerie company opened at 1619 W. Snow Circle on Oct. 1 and will be open through Dec. 31.
 
"This is an exciting way to offer our shoppers fun and different items all the time," Martin says. 
 
And to get shoppers ready for the holiday season, Hyde Park Village is having its annual Enchanted Tree Lighting on Nov. 19, 5-9 p.m. The free, family-friendly event will include the annual tree lighting at 8 p.m., photos with Santa, live music by Late Night Brass, food and beer trucks, a kids' zone, face painting, balloon animals and more.

RCMA opens new child-care center in Dover in east Hillsborough County

Redlands Christian Migrant Association (RCMA) opened the doors to a new child-care center for the children of migrant farmworkers in Dover on Monday, Oct 31st. 

The $3.6 million, 15,000-square-foot center triples the capacity of children served from 88, at the current center, to 264. 

RCMA expects to start caring for 70 children who had been on a waiting list. That number is expected to increase to 172 by the peak of the strawberry season in Dover this February. 

Children cared for at the current center will also be moved to the new center. RCMA is Florida’s largest nonprofit child-care provider with 68 centers across Florida. Its Dover operations are funded by the federal Migrant & Seasonal Head Start program, which focuses on serving migrant families. 

For more information contact Elda Cruz, RCMA Center Coordinator, at 813.707.7002 or via e-mail her by following this link

RCMA abre nuevo centro de cuidados infantiles en Dover

Redlands Christian Migrant Association (RCMA) abrió las puertas a un nuevo centro de cuidado infantil para los hijos de trabajadores agrícolas migrantes en Dover el pasado lunes 31 de octubre. el centro de 15.000 pies cuadrados triplica la capacidad de atención a los niños de 88, en el centro actual, a 264.
 
RCMA espera arrancar sus operaciones con 70 niños que estaban en lista de espera. Pero esperan que ese número aumente a 172 durante la temporada alta de cultivo de fresas en Dover el mes de febrero.
 
Los niños atendidos en el centro actual también serán trasladados al nuevo centro. RCMA es el mayor proveedor de cuidados infantiles sin fines de lucro en Florida con 68 centros en todo el estado. Sus operaciones en Dover son financiadas por el programa federal Migrant & Seasonal Head Start, que se centra en servir a las familias migrantes.
 
Para más información contacte a Elda Cruz, Coordinadora del centro de RCMA, llame al 813.707.7002 o vía correo electrónico 

University area of Tampa will get new park in 2018, kids' basketball league starts in October

Cooking lessons, a playground and a hiking trail are just some of the features of Harvest Hope Park, a new space planned for 20th Street, north of Fletcher Avenue, in the University area of Tampa.
 
The University Area Community Development Corporation announced last week that it received a $423,000 community development block grant from Hillsborough County, and raised $90,000 during its fifth annual gala to build the 7-acre park. The corporation's mission is to redevelop and sustain the at-risk areas surrounding the University of South Florida's Tampa campus.
 
Ground is expected to be broken on the park in November when lighting, irrigation, fencing and parking will be installed. A learning kitchen and community garden are already in place.
 
"Building a park in the heart of the community is about more than just a construction project," says Sarah Combs, the corporation's CEO, "it is about sending a message to the residents of the University Community, letting them know that we care about them and positive change is coming. This community has been promised many things over the past couple decades, and there will never be a more opportunistic time than now to unite and leverage our partnerships, to truly create a healthy and vibrant community."

The park will be completed in phases, with total completion expected in 2018. Once complete, it will feature a tilapia fish farm, hiking trail, playground and sports field.

"The Harvest Hope Park will be the beacon of hope this community needs, uniting residents, encouraging family unity, and most importantly, offering positive activities for youth and adults so they will begin to feel like this is their home, this is their community," Combs says.

In the meantime, the corporation is inviting children ages 9-14 to participate in an eight-week basketball league.

Registration will take place Oct. 3-14. Practices will be Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, starting Oct. 17, 6-9 p.m., depending on the age group. Games will be played on Saturdays, starting Oct. 22, between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. The cost is $45.

To register, call 813-558-5212 or stop by the corporation's center at 14013 N. 22nd St. in Tampa. 

Cement Tile Shop features hand-crafted product in Seminole Heights design studio

Chris Clamp had been working in the family business, Great Britain Tile, for 25 years before striking out on his own as a major retailer of handmade cement tiles. 

During his time selling and installing tile, Clamp, 43, had fallen in love with the craftsmanship that goes into handmade cement tiles. With the rise of social media, he saw an opportunity to sell the hand-crafted product around the United States and internationally. The result is Cement Tile Shop, which recently opened its new studio and headquarters in Seminole Heights.

“We always sold tile, but as I started getting more educated over the years I started getting exposed to more products,” Clamp says. “I really took a liking to hand-made products in general. That led to selling cement tiles.”

Clamp and his wife Jennifer started the business about five years ago, and it quickly became a leading U.S. supplier of handmade cement tiles. Business was so good they outgrew their shop in Lutz. 

Clamp says he had the Tampa neighborhood of Seminole Heights in mind for a new company headquarters and design studio. He found the building that suited his needs at 6506 N. Florida Ave. Cement Tile Shop “quietly” opened over the summer, with an official opening in September.

“I’d been wanting to get up in Seminole Heights for quite some time now,” he says. “I think the area works with our vibe, it being kind of an authentic neighborhood.”

The renovated building, six months in the making, was redesigned by Tampa-based Junto Design Studio. The south wall of the building pops out at north-bound drivers thanks to a cement tile-themed mural painted by Pep Rally Inc.

Cement Tile Shop’s new headquarters offers customers a well-lit studio where they can peruse hundreds of designs and colors that the company can order up quickly. The shop is interactive and enables customers to see in-stock product as well as to mix and match colors to create custom tiles.

“We were able to get this building to put a design center in so our local customers could come see, feel and touch,” he says.

A wall facing customers toward the back of the shop briefly explains the process of making tiles by filling custom-made metal molds with concrete. Each tile has three layers of concrete.
 
Unlike other types of tiles, the surface colors and designs are not painted on; they are made from concrete colored with mineral pigment, marble dust and natural colorants. The liquefied mixture is poured into different sections of the mold to make the designs. 

Two more layers of concrete are added to give the tile its strength and thickness. A hydraulic press is used to compact the mixture. Unlike other tile products, cement tiles are not fired in an oven, making them more environmentally friendly, Clamp says.

Cement tile manufacture, which started in the 1880s, continues in mostly small factories around the world. Clamp gets his product from two factories, one in Asia and the other in England. He declined to reveal the nation where the Asian factory is located.

The company has a warehouse in Tampa stocked with numerous patterned tiles to supply the eastern side of the country. A warehouse in Phoenix supplies the West Coast. The company also has a European Division based in the United Kingdom.

Clamp, a native of Birmingham, England, graduated from Jesuit High School in Tampa. Jennifer is a graduate of the University of South Florida and handles customer service for the company.
 
Cement Tile Shop’s product has been featured on a number of popular television shows such as HGTV’s “Fixer Upper,” “House Hunters Renovation” and “Property Brothers.” Some of the company’s international projects include Qantas Lounge at Hong Kong International Airport, celebrity chef Todd English’s Olives in Abu Dhabi, and J. Crew in London.

2nd phase of Sulphur Springs revitalization project begins

When the City of Tampa broke ground on the initial phase of the Nehemiah Project in 2014, Mayor Bob Buckhorn shoveled the ceremonial dirt holding a little girl named Legacy in his arms.

Earlier this month, Legacy stood on her own two feet, helping Buckhorn hold his shovel as he and other community leaders broke ground for the second phase of the project.

Legacy represents hope for the future of Sulphur Springs, one of the poorest communities in Tampa. The goal of the Nehemiah Project is to revitalize the area. It's named after Nehemiah, a biblical figure who rebuilt the protective wall around Jerusalem within two months.

The project began in January 2014 when Buckhorn announced that the city would invest $1.4 million to build new, single-family homes in Sulphur Springs.

"To create sustainable change, we need more good, steady homeowners who will take pride in their property and in the neighborhood. Those are the type of buyers we want for these new homes,'' Buckhorn told 83 Degrees in May 2014. "My hope is that our public investment will be the catalyst to transforming Sulphur Springs into the type of neighborhood that it can and should be."

Eleven initial parcels were chosen to be rebuilt first because of their proximity to each other, the Sulphur Springs Elementary school and Springhill Community Center. All 11 homes were built and sold by December 2014. 

Groundbreaking of the project's second phase took place Sept. 10. Plans are to continue the revitalization, creating 24 homeownership opportunities on 18 lots. Proceeds from the sales of the homes will be used to build at least six additional homes. 

"Families are now returning to Sulphur Springs and to help us rebuild and restore a great neighborhood," Buckhorn said in a prepared statement. "I can’t wait to see what the next chapter in the history of the Springs brings us."

Gobioff Foundation to launch creative placemaking program in September

A creative placemaking initiative is aiming to improve Tampa through the arts.
 
The Gobioff Foundation, a private family group that works to support human rights organizations in the Tampa arts community, is launching Treasure Tampa (T²) 8:30-10 a.m. on Monday, Sept 19, at The Vault, 611 N. Franklin St., Tampa. The initiative will include up to $30,000 in seed money for a creative placemaking project in the City of Tampa or the neighborhood area served by the University Area Community Development Corporation.
 
According to the National Endowment of the Arts, creative placemaking is the act of partners from public, private, non-profit and community sectors coming together to shape the physical and social character of a neighborhood around arts and cultural activities. The goal is to revive the space, improve local businesses and bring the community together.
 
The free Treasure Tampa (T²) launch event will include breakfast and an inspirational presentation about creative placemaking by Jamie Bennett, executive director of ArtPlace America, a 10-year project to position arts and culture as a core sector of comprehensive community planning and development.
 
"At the launch in September, we will be announcing more details, including the application, review panel and timeline," explains Neil Gobioff, president of the Gobioff Foundation.
 
Gobioff has been involved with the Tampa arts community as a patron since he moved to Tampa in 1995, and he became active in the community through Jobsite Theater during its first season in the late 1990s. He now serves on the Jobsite board.
 
Gobioff's wife, Gianna Rendina-Gobioff, is a Tampa native who has been a cheerleader in the arts community since her brothers were in art school at the University of South Florida. She was a founding board member with Tempus Projects.

"We both believe in the artistic talent that resides here in Tampa," Neil Gobioff says. "It is exciting to us to build great communities through artistic collaborations across multiple sectors."
 
The Treasure Tampa (T²) launch event is open to anyone interested in learning about and participating in creative placemaking. Space is limited, and registration is required. Doors will open at 8 a.m.
 
For more information, contact the Gobioff Foundation.

Unique dining concept, The Hall on Franklin, coming to Tampa Heights

Tampa Heights will soon have a distinctive collection of eateries that Developer Jamal Wilson hopes will help Tampa become a food destination.
 
The Hall on Franklin is an upscale, chef-driven food hall that will feature several dining options, a craft coffee bar, a lounge with specialty signature cocktails, outdoor seating and live entertainment on nights and weekends. It's expected to open this fall in the historic Farris Building, 1701 N. Franklin St., which housed an automobile company in the 1920s. A grand opening is tentatively scheduled for Nov. 1.
 
Wilson came up with the concept over several years. He was exposed to cultural restaurants and food curation while playing professional basketball in Europe, and he visited modern-day dining halls more recently while traveling with his family in the United States, like The Source and Avanti F&B in Denver and The Pennsy and Gotham West Market in New York City.
 
"At some point you begin to wonder if you can deliver something of that level where you live, and eventually you say, 'Why not,'" Wilson says. " … Our local talent, for one, is exceptional, and one of the things I love about Tampa in general and the small pockets of communities like Tampa Heights and Seminole Heights specifically, is how supportive and welcoming we are for new ideas and entrepreneurial ventures."
 
Property owner Maureen Ayral of A2 LLC restored and renovated the building over two years. She refreshed the hardwood floors, brick walls, ceilings and ornate iron details. She also converted the street-level windows that once showcased new model cars to glass garage doors that will bring light and fresh air to the indoor-outdoor dining experience.
 
The 8,000-squre-foot Hall has already partnered with local restaurants, which will showcase unique dishes from their flagship locations or create new pop-up concepts. They include: The North Star Eatery, an Asian fusion concept by Kevin and Singh Hurt of Anise Global Gastrobar; La Bodega, Latin fusion by Felicia LaCalle, the former executive chef of The Samba Room, which is now closed; Bar K?-fe, a coffee bar by Ty Beddingfield, former master barista at Buddy Brew; Bake ’N’ Babes, desserts and confectionary by Julie Curry; Bar Concept, bespoke cocktails by Ro Patel, bar program creator of Franklin Manor and Anise; and Heights Melt Shoppe, gourmet sandwiches, homemade soups and sides, hand-spun milkshakes, and unique popsicles by David Burton of Holy Hog BBQ, Tampa Pizza Co. and So Fresh.
 
Wilson, who estimates the total investment in the project is between $500,000 and $750,000, says The Hall is a great opportunity for local chefs looking to deliver their vision on their own terms.
 
"It's not an easy proposition to start your own restaurant from the ground up, so the collective is a great entry point for an up-and-coming chef to break out," he says.
 
He says the collective is an even better opportunity for Tampa foodies.
 
"There is nothing like being able to order an appetizer from one restaurant, share dishes from three more, while having a craft cocktail designed to complement the menus from multiple restaurants," he says. "Or maybe you just want to stop in for ice cream, dessert or coffee at the walk up open door cafes. I just can't imagine a better experience with family and friends."
 
The dining area will feature modern, high-end design elements, and if visitors see something they like, they'll be able to purchase the same item from The Hall's retail space and have it shipped directly to their home.
 
Entertainment on nights and weekends will be provided by DJs and live bands.
 
"It also helps that on the weekends we will be open until 2 a.m., which lends itself well to the live, work, play theme of the urban corridor," Wilson says. "Your food options should not be limited after (midnight) in a thriving city like Tampa."

St. Petersburg awards $468K to 6 local businesses

Six businesses in St. Petersburg are getting a leg up.
 
On Thursday, Aug. 11, the St. Petersburg City Council gave its approval for more than $468,000 to be divided among the businesses: Delores M. Smith Academy, Imagination Station, Florida Brake and Tire, Power Sports, Advantage Solutions and Chief's Creole Café.
 
St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman says he appreciates the council's support for the measure.
 
"I believe our business community is part of the fabric of St. Petersburg," he says.
 
The money comes from a 2016 Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Grant from the South St. Petersburg Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) and is a component of a 30-year revitalization plan for the area, which is generally located between Fourth Street and 49th Street, from Second Avenue North to 30th Avenue South.
 
This is the first year the CRA has had a competitive grant program. It's designed to help boost private investment by property owns and businesses in commercial and multifamily residential development in South St. Petersburg.
 
"It represents a turning point for not just those in our business community, but for everyone in Florida's best city," Kriseman says. "We are investing not just in buildings and places, but in people as well, because we want to be an innovative, creative and competitive community that helps businesses not just survive but thrive."
 
Kriseman also encourages this year's grant applicants to consider reapplying for additional funding in next year's TIF cycle, which will begin in the first quarter of 2017. An estimated $1.2 million will be available, according to a statement from the City of St. Petersburg.

Downtown St. Pete gets new ramen restaurant, townhomes

There is no slow down in sight when it comes to development in downtown St. Petersburg. 

Buya Ramen

The ramen craze has been looming in the air for some time in big cities like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. Now the trend is hitting the growing Edge District of St. Petersburg, as Buya Ramen gets ready to open its doors. 

The restaurant seats just over 100 people, and will feature a Japanese whiskey bar. The interior is adorned with 12-foot-long community tables, a concrete bar top and a mural done by local artist Michael Vahl

The menu is comprised of the popular Japanese noodles as the name of the restaurant implies, but also features dumplings, duck and other popular dishes from the island nation. 

For more information, click here

Delmar City Homes

In the growing mix of housing in downtown St. Petersburg, Delmar City Homes features four-story townhomes offering luxury amenities.

“Each unit at Del Mar has a roof-top deck, as well as an outdoor living room,” says Jeff Craft, developer at Tampa Bay City Living (TBCL), which developed Del Mar Homes.

The three-bedroom, three-and-a-half bath units also feature a two-car garage, modern finishes and nearly 3,000-square-feet of space. Located at 433 Third St. S., the homes are within walking distance to restaurants, shops and office space.

Construction recently completed on Del Mar Homes, however, three units are still available. 

TBCL has plans for even more projects, with several in the works around the Tampa Bay area, including in the Westshore area, the Crescent Lake neighborhood of St. Petersburg and its own new headquarters.

For more information on both of these properties, visit TBCL's website.

New apartments open for low-income seniors, waiting list forms

A new affordable apartment complex for Tampa-area seniors is 100 percent leased with a waiting list for new openings, says Hillsborough County Affordable Housing Director Paula Harvey.

Haley Park Apartments, a $14.5 million development that celebrated a grand opening in June, is an 80-unit complex just west of the James A. Haley Veterans Hospital. The complex was financed with public and private funds and is managed by Wendover Housing Partners, a privately held real estate company. 

The apartments include many of the same amenities that market-priced apartment dwellers enjoy, but they are priced for very low- to low- and moderate-income residents, 55 and older.

First conceived by Wendover in 2012, Haley Park was intended to address the growing need for housing that low-income seniors can afford. The company’s Founder and President Jonathan L. Wolf points to a National Housing Conference study that said the number of Florida residents aged 65 and older will more than double by 2030.

“As the state’s aging population increases, there is an immediate need for cost-effective rental homes for seniors, especially in metro areas near hospitals and doctors’ offices,” Wolf says in a news release. “Haley Park will help address this rising need in Hillsborough County.”

Harvey says the need for affordable housing of all types is not going away.

“We still need more,” she tells 83 Degrees. “This only addresses part of the problem; it doesn’t solve it. We still have needs for affordable housing in every category from homeless to elderly, and everything in between.”

Wendover first came to Hillsborough County seeking funding for the project in 2012, Harvey says. At that time, the county was able to come up with $750,000 to buy the 4-acre parcel at 1503 E. 130th Avenue. Harvey says the county land-banked the property until more funding became available.

The Affordable Housing Department was able to put together a series of grants: $2.4 million from the federal Home Investment Partnership, $1.7 million from the State Housing Initiative Program (SHIP), and $1.1 million from the federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program. 

Other financing partners were JPMorgan Chase and the Florida Community Loan Fund. RBC Capital Markets-Tax Credit Equity group was the low income housing tax credit syndicator.

“It wasn’t just our funding that was paying for construction,” Harvey says. “They got private financing and multi-family mortgage revenue bonds issued in December 2013. There was a whole host of financing that went together to build the project.”

Wendover broke ground in June 2015. Each of the one- and two-bedroom units comes equipped with a dishwasher, microwave, full-sized washer and dryer, ample storage areas and a monitored emergency call system.

Residents can enjoy a community center, a swimming pool and fitness center. Social, educational and recreational services are offered.

Haley Park’s monthly rents run from $605 to $720, much lower than average rates across Florida which range between $1,176 to $1,657, according to Wendover.

Harvey says her department monitored Wendover to make sure all federal and state regulations were followed, including minority participation in construction. The county will continue to monitor the apartments to make sure new residents meet income requirements. 

Boutique hotel, restaurant coming to Westshore area of Tampa

The Westshore District of Tampa continues to thrive with new development, including a new luxury hotel and a beloved restaurant that are moving into the neighborhood.

Kimpton Hotel

Located at the intersection of O’Brien and Laurel Streets, a new luxury boutique hotel will feature 150 rooms and suites spanning five stories. Designed by award-winning Architect Albert Alfonso of Tampa, the new hotel will also feature many unique amenities.

“The hotel will feature a traditional Italian piazza that will essentially create an intimate town square, where we’re hoping locals and visitors will enjoy a meal, a concert or a stroll,” says Nick Gregory, Senior VP of Hotel Operations for Kimpton Hotels. “We’ll also have all our signature Kimpton amenities, including a hosted nightly wine hour, complimentary custom bike rentals and yoga mats in every room.”

Other hotel attributes include a rooftop bar with separate event space, additional 4,000-square-feet of indoor meeting and event space and the first U.S. outpost for Chef Silvia Baracchi, best known for her Michelin-starred restaurant and retreat in Cortona, Tuscany. All of the food served at the upscale restaurant will be supplied by a new off-site, state-of-the-art hydroponic farm named Red Barn Farm. Locals can look forward to taking signature cooking classes from Chef Baracchi.

The boutique hotel is expected to be open early 2018.

Miller’s Ale House

The popular chain is moving into the Westshore District. With three other locations in the Tampa Bay area, Miller’s Ale House will be opening at 3860 West Columbus Drive. The property used to be home to the infamous Without Walls International Church.

With plenty of adult beverages like beer, wine and cocktails, and casual dining provisions such as burgers, flatbreads and fajitas, the chain has become a local favorite. On the same property is Grady Square, a $56-million luxury apartment building, which is expected to be completed later this summer.
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