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Townhomes still booming in downtown St. Petersburg

The townhouse boom in downtown St. Petersburg continues, as two more projects are announced.

Urban Village Townhomes

Situated at 2462 First Avenue N., Urban Village Townhomes, gives homeowners the unique opportunity to purchase new construction in the historic Kenwood neighborhood. With 10 units, each two bedroom, two and half-bath, the two-story townhomes offer over 1,300-square feet of living space.

“The best amenity Urban Village has to offer is its location,” says Bill Andrasco, of ODC Construction, which is building the community. “It’s footsteps from Central Avenue, where you can walk to restaurants and bars, but it’s also located in the warehouse arts district, which is also great.

Andrasco goes on to say that local developer Leah Campen, who is the designer on the project is taking into account the neighborhood in her design.

“The design of the townhomes is inspired by the Kenwood neighborhood, so it really compliments the community.”

Homes are anticipated to be completed fall 2016, and will be for sale in the upper $200,000s. Units are available for pre-sale.

 801 Conway

This 35-unit townhome community will be located at the corner of Burlington and 8th Street North.  Five floor plans are available with the average square footage around 1,500. Two and three bedroom options are available in this community, which is expected to sell in the upper $200,000s.

The townhomes will have a modern look as developed by Aspen VG, the same company behind 3405 Swann in Tampa and Villas of Deleon in St. Petersburg, among other local projects. Aspen VG is working in collaboration with Mesh Architecture.

Construction is expected to be completed by summer 2017; however units are available for sale now. For more information, visit the community’s website

4 Clearwater Beach bridges are being replaced

Four bridges in the Island Estates community of Clearwater are being replaced.

It started when someone kayaking under one of the bridges noticed degrading concrete and reported it to the city of Clearwater.

“We hired a consultant to do a study and when we got the reports back we found out the bridges needed to be replaced,” says Roger Johnson, Project Manager for the city of Clearwater.

Johnson explains the process is quite complex, involving demolition of the bridges, which is not easy when these roadways are the only access point to the fingers of the Island Estates community. In order to replace them, the city has to demolish one side at a time, while using the other side as two-way traffic for people to get back and forth. Once one side is completed, construction can begin on the other side.

Minor repairs are being made to an additional five bridges in the community. The total cost of the project is $3.6 million.
So how are other bridges in Clearwater fairing?

“The FDOT inspects our bridges regularly and provides reports on their findings,” Johnson says. “For now we don’t see anything substantial in the foreseeable future, of course if something shows up then we will obviously address the issue.”

As for the construction on the Island Estate bridges, progress is moving forward and construction is expected to be completed April 2017.

For the most up-to-date information on road closures, and construction updates on the project visit the city’s engineering website.

More new restaurants, bars coming to Seminole Heights

Three new eateries and a combined bar and dog park are set to open in Tampa in the same stretch of North Nebraska Avenue that is now home to Ella’s Americana Folk Art Café and Southern Brewing & Winemaking by early 2017.

Ebisu Sushi Shack will likely be the first of the new establishments to open its doors in a former bungalow at 5116 N. Nebraska Ave. The restaurant plans a soft launch for the Seminole Heights neighborhood in late June or early July. Ron Simmons, co-owner with his wife, Akemi Simmons, says the menu will include a wide range of sushi choices, plus other Asian dishes.

“It’s a sushi place, but we’re not going to do only sushi,” Simmons said. “There will be a lot of small dishes people can share.”

Akemi worked in restaurants for most of her adult life and will handle the cooking. Simmons will keep his “day job” as a history teacher in the Hillsborough County school system.

Antoinette’s French Bakery and Café will move into the small strip mall at Osborne Avenue and Nebraska where Old Heights Bistro is located. The café will be open for breakfast and lunch and will feature homemade pastries and sandwiches, according to Stan Lasater, president of the Southeast Seminole Heights Civic Association. Lasater says the café owners hope to be open in time for Taste of the Heights, a yearly food-tasting festival in the neighborhood.

“They’re working with an architect and should be starting construction by no later than mid-July,” Lasater said. “They’re hoping to be open in time for the Taste of the Heights in November or by the first of the year.”

Combining the popularity of dog-friendly venues and the urban-chic craze of container crate bars, the Seminole Heights Dog Park Bar is planning to open on a vacant lot near Nebraska Avenue and Genesee Street. The bar’s Facebook page says the owners hope to open by the fall. 

Lasater says the bar will feature a fenced-in area on the 30,000-square-foot lot where dogs can play while their owners enjoy the finest craft beers, many from local breweries. The bar’s motto will be, “Don’t leave your best friend at home when you feel like going out for a beer.”

For a sweet treat on a hot summer day, Pirate Pops will feature organic, gourmet popsicles at 5120 N. Nebraska Ave. The company, which has been a popular stop at Tampa’s Downtown Market, says on its Facebook Page that the popsicles are made in small batches with all-natural ingredients. The company claims to buy all the fruit used in the pops from local organic farmers and back-yard gardeners.

“Their claim is they use no sweeteners except the best Florida cane sugar,” Lasater said. “Everything is locally grown with no additives. They are amazing popsicles.”

An opening date for the popsicle shop has not been announced.

Hopes for New Tampa Cultural Center live on

New Tampa residents have been hoping for nearly 15 years that an arts and cultural center would rise on 17 acres of vacant land along Bruce B. Downs Boulevard.

Now, with a private developer ready to build the center as part of a larger residential-commercial development, supporters of the project are awaiting word of a ground-breaking. But county officials say residents will have to wait a while longer.

The project is still in what Hillsborough County officials call in “inspection period,” during which the developer and the county work out details of the site plan, says Josh Bellotti, county real estate and facilities services director. That period ends July 30.

After that, Bellotti says the development enters an “approval period” ending Jan. 9 so the developer can get necessary rezoning and final site approval from the city of Tampa. The property, across from the upscale Hunter’s Green housing development, is owned by the county but lies in the Tampa city limits. 

Last July, county commissioners approved a real estate purchase agreement with developer Hunters Lake Tampa LLC for just over $2 million. In addition to the sale of the land, the agreement calls for Hunters Lake to construct public amenities and infrastructure valued at $2.17 million.

The county and developer will close on the property in February, Bellotti says.
 
Doug Wall, founder and director of the New Tampa Players performing troupe, says he and other residents met six weeks ago with county Commissioner Victor Crist and a representative of the county Parks, Recreation and Conservation Department. Crist has been a prime proponent of the project.

“They are working on the site plans,” Wall says. “We were supposed to get together again and give input on floor plans, but I have not heard anything since that meeting.”

Crist could not be reached for comment. 

Wall says the cultural center will cover about 20,000 square feet and include a theater with just under 300 seats. It has not been decided whether the seating will be permanent or removable so the space can host other pursuits when not in use as a theater. The building could be expanded later to 30,000 square feet by adding a second floor, according to county plans.

In addition to drama, the center will also house classrooms for music, dance and visual arts.

The New Tampa Players have been lobbying the county and city of Tampa governments for a cultural center since 2000, Wall says. Though the city paid for studies showing a need for such a center, neither local government would come up with the $7 million to $10 million needed for construction.

In 2009, Commissioner Ken Hagan convinced commissioners to appropriate land for the center, however, there were “strings,” Wall says.

“We had to raise the money up front,” he says. “We had to have a business plan approved by the county.

“Basically, for a small nonprofit, it made it impossible for us to do anything,” Wall says. “It died out until Victor Crist took over the project and wanted to make something happen.”
The residential-commercial development will be on 17 buildable acres out of an 80-acre county-owned tract. The rest of the area is either wetlands or will be used as a water retention area for drainage off Bruce B. Downs Boulevard. 

Funding for the center is likely to be discussed during county budget hearings next month. In past meetings, Crist says the project would need $7.5 million in county funding.

Outdoor public art adds to Tampa Riverwalk experience

There is a walkable outdoor museum of sorts in downtown Tampa, and it’s growing.   

When the latest segment of the Tampa Riverwalk is completed in June, two enormous public artworks will also be formally unveiled for all to enjoy. Water, not surprisingly, plays a role in both pieces, though they couldn’t be more distinct in aesthetic and material. Both artworks will be located under bridges serving functional, protective roles as safety barriers.  

“Tampa is a place where artwork is expected and presumed,” says Robin Nigh, Manager of Art Programs for the City of Tampa. “It is integrated; you can really tell the difference when [public art] is part of the design versus an afterthought. It’s just part of who we are.” 

The new artworks can be viewed by foot, bike or boat along the Riverwalk from Tampa’s Water Works Park to the Straz Center. 

Under the Laurel Street Bridge, one will find Woven Waves a vibrant ceramic steel creation with large-scale folded corrugations. The effect of the textile-like design changes with the viewer’s movement. Houston-based Re:Site that created the piece says on its website that they drew inspiration from Tampa’s cultural diversity, “bringing to mind the metaphor of a quilt.” 

The second structure, entitled Andante by artist Heidi Lippman -- an enormous, stunning work of glass -- will be located under the 1-275 underpass and can also be seen from the road. Nigh notes that because of materials used, digitally printed tempered glass, and the artwork’s east-west orientation, there is a constant change in how the site is experienced as the light of day changes. She characterizes the space as “soothing” and notes that the musically inspired piece brings “color and quiet to an otherwise typically massive FDOT structure.”  

This follows several other major refurbishments and new public artworks  downtown Tampa. Among them, numerous sculptures, mosaics and installations at the recently inaugurated Perry Harvey Park; Stay Curious at the Poe Garage by artists Bask and Tes One, and the refurbishment and relocation of the Yaacov Agam sculpture Visual Welcome to Bayshore Boulevard and America, America sculpture by Barbara Neijna to the south side of the Laurel Street Bridge.

On the City of Tampa website one can do a public artworks “web tour.” There are 68 sites to view. 

A better plan might be to download the Tampa’s Public Art After Dark map and take a tour the old fashioned way, discovering in person this open-air and open-to-all museum. The most recent additions, Andante and Woven Waves, have yet to be updated on this map, but now you know where the treasures are hidden. 

Large skatepark coming to St. Petersburg

Skaters are stoked as news of a new skatepark in St. Petersburg breaks.
 
Advocates of the $1.25 million new skatepark were thrilled when St. Petersburg City Council unanimously approved the design and construction of the future skaters' oasis.
 
With bowls, half-pipes and ramps, the park will be a concrete playground for skaters. The skatepark will be regional grade, meaning designed at a large scale, within Campbell Park.
 
“The reason for building a regional grade skatepark is to both provide our younger citizens with access to a high quality course, and to have a facility that generates economic development,” says City Councilman Karl Nurse for the city of St. Petersburg.
 
Nurse explains that the economic impact involves the plans for future skating tournaments.
 
“We have had similar experiences with our pool, which attracts tournaments and brings folks to town for two to four days.”
 
Campbell Park was a natural choice for the city because it is a large area that can accommodate the new skatepark. It also happens to be connected to the Pinellas Trail, offering convenience to skaters and visitors.
 
Team Pain, a designer of skateparks out of Winter Park FL, has been chosen for the project. Construction of the new skatepark will be handled by Cutler Associates based in Tampa.
 
The question on many a skater’s mind is when they can hit the pavement. According to Nurse, construction is expected to begin early fall this year, and be completed by fall of 2017.

Upscale bar, restaurant coming to downtown Tampa

An upscale bar and new restaurant are the latest additions coming to downtown Tampa.  
 
Franklin Manor
 
Situated at 912 North Franklin Street, Franklin Manor will offer guests both a bar and entertainment venue.
 
“There is a small handful of places in town you can get a quality drink at but there isn't anywhere in Tampa you can enjoy an elevated crafted cocktail and be entertained at the same time,” says David Anderson of the Nocturnal Group, the company behind the project. “Our inside area and large outside patio dual stage format allows us to be unique.”
 
Franklin Manor will serve craft beers and specialty cocktails designed by local mixologist Rohit Patel. Happy hours and live music are expected to be a staple at the new joint.
 
The Carriage House
 
Sharing space with Franklin Manor is The Carriage House, a new restaurant concept, also created by The Nocturnal Group. Featuring gourmet sandwiches and baskets, the menu “features a modern take on classic Americana and Tampa-inspired dishes,” Anderson says.
 
The combined bar and restaurant establishment by the Nocturnal Group is a $1.3 million investment. Designer Robert Ibarra from Alfonso Architects has been recruited by the group for the downtown project.
 
“Downtown was our first and only choice,” Anderson says.
 
Franklin Manor and The Carriage House is expected to open by mid-July 2016.

MOSI working on move to Channelside District

MOSI could be moving to downtown Tampa.

Tampa's Museum of Science & Industry (MOSI) is in the process of developing a task force to plan, design and raise funds for a new science center in downtown. The task force will be comprised of community partners, land use experts, philanthropists, museum master planners, scientists and educators. This news follows a vote at the museum's board of directors meeting earlier this month, which looked at a feasibility study to rebuild a new science center around Amalie Arena.

The move to downtown is part of Jeff Vinik's redevelopment plan for the Channelside District.

“One year ago, Tampa Bay Lightning owner Jeff Vinik invited MOSI to consider becoming a centerpiece cultural institution in the new $2 billion development his company is creating in the Channelside District,” says Grayson Kamm of the Museum of Science and Industry (MOSI).

Vinik has pledged financial support through his company Strategic Property Partners.

While it is still early in the planning stages, the downtown museum is described by Kamm as a “new, world-class, future-focused science center.” He goes on to say that the new site will also be environmentally friendly.

“The feasibility study called our current 300,000-square-foot campus on Fowler Avenue overbuilt, with countless inefficiencies,” he says. “Our new facility will be appropriately sized for our market and built with environmental sustainability in mind.”
 
If everything goes as planned and a new museum is built in downtown, the MOSI site at Fowler Ave would be closed and re-purposed by the county.

“Our current 74-acre site along Fowler Avenue is in the heart of Hillsborough County’s Innovation District, and there is potential to redevelop the land into something that could contribute greatly to the economic prosperity of the county and the entire region,” Kamm says. “Hillsborough County has not laid out any specific plans for the land.”

New single-family homes coming to East Tampa

A new housing community is in the making in East Tampa.

Ground is breaking this month on 13 new homes at the corner of North 34th Street and East 28th Avenue in Tampa. Neighborhood Lending Partners (NLP) and Corporation to Develop Communities (CDC) of Tampa are starting construction of a new community of single-family houses utilizing the new Florida Minority Impact Housing Fund (FMIHF).

The site chosen by the CDC will eventually be filled with houses from Beacon Homes.

“We wanted to have a large enough parcel of land in East Tampa where we could build and make a substantial visual and economic impact in the community,” says Frank Cornier, VP of Real Estate Development for the CDC of Tampa. “This new development gives a great, affordable opportunity to those that want to purchase a new home in the city of Tampa.”

NLP, a nonprofit multi-bank lending consortium, which provides financing to developers of affordable housing and community revitalization is funding the project. It is doing so through the Florida Minority Impact Housing Fund (FMIHF), which the NLP created. Bank of America and Wells Fargo are the primary supporters of the $3 million dollar fund. The land where the development will be built was purchased from the Tampa Housing Authority.

“We’re thrilled to establish the Florida Minority Impact Housing Fund and know that Beacon Homes will be a wonderful addition to East Tampa and a vital part of the area’s revitalization efforts,” Debra Reyes, Neighborhood Lending Partners President and CEO states in a news release. “Quality, affordable housing should be available to all Florida residents and it is our goal to create those opportunities in as many communities as possible.”

According to Cornier, construction on the new housing community is expected to be completed in less than two years, depending on demand.
 

The Space theater in West Tampa grows a loyal following

A new arts space in a historic part of Tampa is thriving.

Simply called The Space, a restaurant turned performing arts venue in West Tampa, is now in its fifth month of business, which is booming. The Space is an innovative concept where round tables and couches replace typical theater seating, and performers sit in the audience and perform on raised platforms around the establishment as opposed to a traditional stage.

What is also unique about The Space is its location. While other owners may have looked for locations in downtown, Westshore or Hyde Park, Jared O'Roark and co-owner Erica Sutherlan chose West Tampa and the community has embraced them.

“So far the community has been so great to us,” says O'Roark. “There are several local gentlemen in the area who help with parking, and reassure people who are not familiar with the area that this is a safe area. When you make that turn on Main Street, some people may perceive the neighborhood as dangerous, but believe me, I live around here and it is not dangerous.”

Currently at The Space, "Elegies for Angels, Punks & Raging Queens,'' is playing through April 24th. The musical is an innovative production in which each actor plays five to six characters -- each sharing his or her experience with death from AIDS.

So what is it like for performers in this unique theatrical environment?

'It's much more intimate and more challenging in a good way,” says Actor A.R. Williams who plays multiple roles. “It has made me a stronger artist because on a traditional stage with all the lights you can't even see the audience. Here, you can see and even feel what the audience is going through as they watch the performance. To feel the emotion and that energy just makes me a better performer.”

Tron Montgomery, who plays everyone from a homeless man to a flamboyant gay man to a horrific character who seeks to infect as many as he can with the virus to a war vet, states that bringing The Space to West Tampa is important for the community.

“Where I grew up is basically what you see outside,” Montgomery says. “I love the idea of bringing the arts back to change the community. To bring the arts to this neighborhood gives people a new aspect of life. It changes you, it certainly changed me. I could have easily ended up a completely different person, but theater saved me.”

"Elegies for Angels, Punks & Raging Queens'' will be playing its last show this weekend, April 22-24. For ticket information, visit the theater's website

Dade City experiences new investments in downtown

Dade City, known for its quaint downtown and small town charm, is experiencing quite a development boom. 
 
New city hall and police station
 
One of the biggest projects recently unveiled is a new municipal complex. The 22,000-square-foot building located on Meridian Avenue houses both city hall and the police department. Paid for with reserve funds, the $6.6 million project makes life easier for residents and government employees alike.
 
“Employees are now under one roof,” says Dade City Manager Bill Poe. “Previously city hall staff were in two separate buildings, which caused citizens, developers and visitors to often have to go between buildings to accomplish a simple task.”
 
In addition to streamlining things by having all of the offices in the same location, the project also involved implementing new technology into the police department. Upgrades include state-of-the-art forensics room, a secure sally port, new interview rooms and a safe room for victims.
 
Poe says other city projects are on the horizon including an extension of the Hardy Trail, Beauchamp Pond expansion and downtown storm water improvements.
 
Flint Creek Outfitters
 
This is the second store in Florida for the outdoor specialty shop, with its other location in Ocala. One of the newer proprietors in Dade City, Flint Creek Outfitters is located at 14129 7th St. The store not only offers an array of camping and fishing products, but a lifestyle. With guided trips, monthly fly fishing competitions and owners with a rich history living with nature, the store promises to take you on an adventure. 
 
Shoppes of Dade City
 
When the first Publix in Dade City opened last year, it became the anchor of The Shoppes at Dade City, a strip plaza managed by Crossman & Company. With a total of 54,000-square-feet of retail property the plaza has a plenty of space for business owners. Aside from the Publix, there is a nail salon and a Chinese restaurant already open.
 
Other developments taking place around town include a new medical practice at Meridian and 10th Street, which is currently under construction. Florida Hospital Zephyrhills has obtained a permit for the space, however no other details are available at this time.

Community art giveback begins in Channel District, Tampa

Art is springing from the walls in the Channel District, literally.

The Channel District Community Alliance, Inc. in cooperation with the homeowner’s association at the Grand Central at Kennedy has begun the first installment of their art giveback to the community. The project entitled, “Waves of Change,” is a four-part art series that will reflect the overall spirit of the district.

The purpose of the art is to bring beauty to the neighborhood, but, according to Vance Arnett, President of the Channel District Community Alliance, it goes beyond just esthetics.

“We are a walkable community so we want to provide people with beautiful surroundings, but we also want to give people a destination to walk to,” Arnett says. “We want to have something that you will want to show visitors, family and friends when they come and visit.”

So what will people see when they walk the streets of the Channel District? A mural created by Artists Meaghan Farrell Scalise of Traditional and Digitial Arts, LLC (TADA) and Rebekah Lazaridis.

“We really want to catapult the arts scene here in this area,” Scalise says. “The neighbors that have seen our progress have expressed such joy over it and we hope that it provides the residents here with a sense of community and pride living in the Channel District.”

 It took the artists under a week to complete the mural.

“We are planning more art projects and each one will have a theme,” Arnett says. “One will be indicative of the history of the Channel District, another of the lifestyle and one that represents our future.  We also plan to strategically place them around the community so again they are destination spots for people to walk to.”

You can see the “Waves of Change” mural at Grand Central at Kennedy located at 1120 East Kennedy Boulevard in Tampa. 

New live, work, play, stay places coming to Downtown Dunedin

The sounds of construction are back in Downtown Dunedin with a new mixed-use building going up and other projects just beginning or in the works.

Victoria Place

Located at 821 Victoria Drive in Dunedin, Victoria Place is under construction. This mixed-use building will house 30 units and eight retail spaces when it is completed later this year.

There are several factors that make Victoria Place an attractive place for future residents, including “the urban lifestyle that Dunedin offers,” says Claudia Emery of Victoria Place. “The walkability to events, restaurants and boutique shops is a draw to the community.”

Developer and contractor JMC Communities Inc. along with architect BSB Design Inc. are working on the project, which is expected to be completed fall of 2016.

Artisan Apartment Homes

Artisan Apartment Homes is a proposed four-story apartment home development, which includes retail shops and a public garage leased by the city at the corner of Monroe Street and Douglas Avenue.

If all goes as planned, construction will start June 1st and be completed by summer 2017. The new complex will house 65 units, with more than 11,000-square-feet of retail space.

Dunedin Bed & Breakfast

Dunedin, with its small town charm, is no stranger to the bed & breakfast concept. Therefore, it is no surprise that a new bed & breakfast is planned for downtown Dunedin. The 11-unit lodging concept situated at 520 and 530 Skinner Boulevard is currently in the pre-construction phase.

The proposed development includes fives bedroom units inside the main building with an additional six units in detached duplexes. The main building will have a wrap-around porch, while the duplex units will have front porches. Retail space on the property is also planned.

New bicycle/pedestrian path connects Clearwater to Safety Harbor in Pinellas County

Good news for local and visiting pedestrians and bicyclists as the city of Clearwater announces the completion of an extended path running along Bayshore Boulevard on the eastern edge of the city along Cooper Bayou and Old Tampa Bay.

The trail, which connects the Courtney Campbell Causeway to Ream Wilson Trail at Del Oro Park is expected to be completed by today, March 1st.
 
“Providing bicycle and pedestrian accommodation is important for multimodal transportation alternatives, economic development and recreation for the city,” says Felicia Donnelly with the parks and recreation department for the City of Clearwater.
 
Donnelly says this connection will be among several other pedestrian and bicycle trail unions throughout the city, including Duke Energy, CSX, Druid Connection, Landmark Drive and Belleair trails. The city’s master plan for proposed bicycle and pedestrian paths proposes adding over 25 miles dedicated to trails throughout Clearwater.
 
The Druid Trail, which is expected to be completed later this year, will be a four-mile multiple use section along Druid Road. It will connect to the Pinellas Trail and residential areas, as well as Clearwater High School and Glen Oaks Park.
 
The city hopes that the connection between the Courtney Campbell Causeway and Ream Wilson Trail will open up a traffic-free path for pedestrians and bicyclists from Cypress Point Park to downtown Clearwater and north to Safety Harbor. With the master plan, the expectation is the network of trails will link the beaches to the Pinellas Trail, which runs North to South through Pinellas County.  
 
The trail will be complete with two bike fix-it stations where bicyclists can fix minor problems to their bikes without having to leave the trail. The city plans to install six more stations along the trails by the beginning of the summer.

Tampa Heights neighborhood tour of homes on Sunday

One of the most popular emerging neighborhoods in Tampa is welcoming visitors and future residents to take a peek inside during the 14th annual Tampa Heights Tour of Homes on Sunday, February 28th.

The tour will include seven homes never previously showcased in the annual event, as well as some other new unique aspects.

 “We are featuring commercial property this year,” says Chris Currie with the Tampa Heights Civic Association. “The Rialto Theatre on Franklin Street will be part of the tour. I don’t think a lot of people have been able to get into see it, but it’s been undergoing preservation and restoration. We will also be featuring Hidden Springs Brewery and they are offering discounts on their craft beers to visitors of the home tour.”

The historic Tampa Heights neighborhood has been experiencing investments leading to quite a transformation including the recent additions of Ulele Restaurant and Brewery, Water Works Park and the Riverwalk Extension, which is expected to be completed by mid-year.

According to Currie, properties in the neighborhood where the Tour of Homes will be held are valued between $250,000 and $350,000.

For those planning to attend the event, the tour starts at the community center at 2005 North Lamar Avenue In Tampa. There is parking available at the community center and ticket sales -- $10 each -- will start at noon. Discounted tickets are available for purchase online. The tour ends at 5 p.m.

“The Tour of Homes is the single greatest source of funds for the Tampa Heights Civic Association,” Currie says. “100-percent of the proceeds go to the association whose goal is to better the Tampa Heights community.”
355 Neighborhoods Articles | Page: | Show All
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