| Follow Us:

health : Innovation + Job News

139 health Articles | Page: | Show All

KeriCure Invisible Bandage Expands Product Line, Seeks Capital Funding

A Wesley Chapel based business is expanding its product line and seeking additional funding to increase its sales force and market presence.

KeriCure is a proprietary invisible bandage product that provides a natural, safe, effective way to heal topical wounds. The product uses a unique nanoparticle emulsion technology to mimic the skin’s natural healing properties.

CEO and Founder Kerriann Greenhalgh, PhD an organic chemist and University of South Florida graduate, created the product after being personally affected by inadequate over the counter wound care. Her husband contracted a serious MRSA infection from a small cut on his hand and almost lost the use of his entire hand. Her chemistry background led her to create an innovative solution that is now available for public use.

The company launched in August 2012 and has products for both veterinary and human use available in retail stores such as Amazon, Vitamin Discount Centers, Publix and Earth Origins as well as online.

They recently launched a Series A Fundraise, seeking funding to grow their market presence and expand their product line, with particular focus on the healthcare space. FDA clearance is currently being sought for the advanced liquid bandage, which will be used by physicians to protect surgical incisions.  

"We’re looking to capitalize on the success we had the first two years," says Greenhalgh.

They are also looking to add additives to the natural product line such as vitamin E and tea tree oil.

Kericure was a recent participant in the Greater Tampa Chamber of Commerce’s Startup Scholars program, which is cited as a big contributor to success. As a result of that program, Greenhalgh helped start a local networking group called the Consumer Products Club, which supports local businesses with shared resources, services, opportunities and ideas for marketing and distribution channels.  

"We’re all working together and seeing growth across the board for everybody,” says Greenhalgh. “Each person is bringing unique experiences and successes to the table."

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Kerriann Greenhalgh, KeriCure

Health Insurance Innovations Announces Acquisition, Expansion

With the introduction of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the demand for information about health insurance products has increased dramatically. Consumers often turn to websites to help them navigate the insurance space and learn about available options.

A recent acquisition by Tampa-based Health Insurance Innovations (HII) aims to capitalize on this need and provide more reliable, easily understood information for consumers.  

HII is a cloud-based technology platform that links health insurance agents with consumers to provide quotes and sell customized, flexible insurance plans. Silicon Valley-based HealthPocket is a data aggregation technology that provides a repository of health insurance information for consumers to view and purchase, including both private and government-funded options. The website allows consumers to rank available plans by price, doctor or other factors such as prescription drug needs.

The merging of the two companies will provide even more customized services for consumers to help navigate often confusing information about health insurance options.

HII plans to use the acquisition to fuel the company’s growth and competitive advantage, including sales and continuing the track record of success. The company is taking over additional office space in their Tampa location and will eventually expand their local employee base.

"Consumers will be engaged with the tools and data to help them make better and more informed decisions which lead to lower annual healthcare costs," says Kevin Coleman, head of research and data for HealthPocket. "We really hope to empower the consumer to make the best decisions."

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Sources: Kevin Coleman, HealthPocket; Mike Kosloske, HII

On Tampa Bay's Radar: A New Exercise App To Help You Get Fit

Do you spend a lot of time traveling for work or constricted in a home office? The new iOS app Fittr could be your fitness solution.

Initially developed as a workout service for people at home with limited equipment, Fittr now features unique workouts suitable for home, the gym, a park or a hotel room.

Fitness is a fast-growing niche market for purveyors of mobile applications. From exercise apps designed for your smartphone or tablet to app-based nutritional databases, there is no shortage of opportunity to exercise with the help of a hand-held device.

The Tampa Bay-based startup team behind Fittr plans to distinguish itself from the competition in a few ways.

"The noticeable difference between our workouts and our competition is that ours is a 1-2-3 punch: It's adaptive on the run, it learns from the user over time, AND learns from the data of the entire group,'' says Fittr's Chief Marketing Technologist Kiki Schirr. "Here's an example: Don't want to do squats today? Swap it. Swap squats a few times and we'll stop suggesting it,'' Schirr explains.

Once the app learns the habits and likes or dislikes of your age group or weight range, it will aim to offer tailored suggestions that take the data into account.

In addition to adaptive fitness routines, the Fittr app utilizes a motivational point system that rewards users who increase workout difficulty or length over time. Exercises that earn a certain number of points on day one earn less on day four unless you up the intensity or number of reps. To boost your overall Fittr score (and to get a more well-rounded workout), you'll have to change things up. Points are calculated based on a variety of factors, including your personal fitness level as well as data from the overall set.

Once opened, the application prompts you to answer a few questions about your fitness level and workout habits. Choose between goals like Lose Weight, Get Cut and Get Stronger. Track metrics that matter to you, whether it's weight lost or inches gained. Plug in preferences and custom information like the type of equipment you have available on a given day.
Fittr CEO Tyler Perkins, an athlete and ACE-certified personal trainer, designed the foundation of every Fittr workout.

New users can download the app and enjoy a free one-week trial of built-in exercises. After that, it's $11.99 per month to join the workout service. Multi-month packages will be available soon, Schirr says.

Along with Schirr and Perkins, Fittr's team includes Chief Design Officer and Project Manager Nolan Perkins and CTO Seo Townsend.

The first version of Fittr was released during a launch party on July 16 at Tampa Bay WaVE. A Fundable campaign for Fittr also opened that day.

Post-launch plans include adding nutrition content and building an Android-compatible application.

"After nutrition, we'll be adding social aspects. After social aspects, it's device integration. Then social round two, then adding niche exercises, then more devices, and then... we have so many wonderful things planned for this app!'' Schirr says.

The startup team was recently accepted to Tampa Bay WaVe's FirstWAVE accelorator program.

"Fittr is incredibly grateful for all the opportunities that the Tampa Bay area has provided. From the [Hillsborough County] EDI2 initiative, Tampa Bay Innovates, Ignite Tampa Bay, StartupGrind (http://www.83degreesmedia.com/features/grind042214.aspx), TBTF, or Collaborative Technologies of Tampa Bay, everyone has welcomed us with open arms,'' says Schirr. "However, we owe an even deeper debt of gratitude to Tampa Bay WaVE, which has provided us access to amazing mentors and other startups who've been there before.''

"Tampa is full of great opportunities for startups,'' Perkins agrees. "We're grateful for all the support of the Tampa Bay community.''
 
Writer: Justine Benstead
Source: Kiki Schirr, Chief Marketing Technologist, Fittr

Omega Communities, Sarasota Churches To Develop Senior Living Communities, Create 300 Jobs

Omega Communities, a Birmingham, Ala.-based organization that develops senior living communities on land leased in partnership with faith-based organizations, is bringing its unique business model to Florida's Gulf coast.

Omega is partnering with the Church of Hope in Sarasota and the South Biscayne Church in North Port to develop two assisted living and memory care campuses in Sarasota County.

Omega works with qualified investors in the financing, development and operation of senior care facilities, which are built on land leased by local faith-based organizations. In return, the churches receive a percentage -- between 10 and 25 percent -- of the profit generated by the senior living communities.

"These senior living communities are designed from the inside out. What that means is they are built with a core mission -- a partnership with a large, community impacting church -- and that foundation becomes the center of not only the design of the facility, but more importantly, the core programmatic level of care that will be provided in that community,'' says Omega Communities COO James Taylor, Jr.

Taylor says that the project cost on each Sarasota County facility is just over $30 million, and that once both facilities are completed, the economic impact on Sarasota County is estimated to be in excess of $30 million per year.

The Springs at South Biscayne Church broke ground in January 2014, and the project is expected to reach completion in early spring 2015. The 11,000-square-foot facility will feature 38 memory care units and 95 assisted living units.

The Fountains of Hope broke ground in Sarasota earlier this month (July), with an estimated completion date in fall 2015. Between 150 to 200 jobs will be created during the construction phase, and upon completion, the 9,000-square-foot facility will require 100 fulltime employees.

"We have built a model that utilizes the very best of both the nonprofit and for-profit models for senior care communities. At the core, we've developed a partnership with the church that will provide ministry, volunteers and marketing … to provide a vital resource for the local community,'' says Taylor.

Writer: Jessi Smith
Source: James Taylor, Jr., Omega Communities

Quest Diagnostics Opens National Center In Tampa, Creates 350 Jobs

Quest Diagnostics will provide about 350 jobs at the new diagnostics center that is now open in Tampa near Busch Gardens.

Job positions are in customer service, logistics and human resources. Company officials anticipate hiring will continue through 2015. Some of those jobs will be subsidized with state and local funds.

The 48,000-square-foot facility, at 10441 University Center Drive, will provide customer service and logistics operations for  Quest's nationwide operations. As one of two Quest Diagnostics National Operations Centers, it also will share human resource services for the company's 45,000 employees. The second national center is in Lenexa KS.

"This new center will elevate Quest's customer services to the next level of responsiveness and quality," says James E. Davis, Quest's senior vice president of operations. "It reflects our comittment to delivering a superior customer experience and providing diagnostics insights that will help people lead healthier lives."

The architectural design is by San Francisco-based Gensler which has a Tampa office. Construction is by Rhode Island-based Gilbane which has several locations in the Tampa Bay area.

The Tampa facility will provide state-of-the-art technology to monitor air and ground transportation of patient specimens from about 2,200 patient service centers nationwide. Quest's services include advanced genetic cancer tests as well as routine cholesterol and diabetes screenings.

In Florida, Quest has full-service clinical laboratories in Tampa, Miramar and Orlando.  There also are dermatological pathology laboratories and offices and patient service centers statewide.

The center is expected to create about $9.3 million in capital investment.

Quest is eligible to receive about $675,000 in incentives from the state's Qualified Target Industry Program. About $540,000 is from the state with the remainder from the city of Tampa and Hillsborough County. The funds will subsidize up to 175 jobs that will pay a minimum average annual salary of slightly more than $47,500.

"Florida's life science industry is one of the best in the nation and as companies like Quest Diagnostics expand their presence in Florida, the sector will continue to grow and more businesses will look at the state as a vital location," says Gary Swoope, president of Enterprise Florida, the state's chief economic development organization.

Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Gary Swoope, Enterprise Florida

Bike-Share Program Gets Ready To Roll In Tampa

Bicycle wheels are almost ready to roll on Tampa streets. Some assembly is required.
 
Beginning in late August, 300 rent-able bicycles scattered across more than 30 locations in downtown, Channelside, Ybor City, Hyde Park and Davis Islands will kick-start Coast Bike Share, the city's long-anticipated "bike share" program.
 
Mayor Bob Buckhorn hopped aboard one of the blue bicycles for a short spin down the sidewalk by City Hall.
 
"I think it is one more amenity that will allow the city to take its place as a great American city," he says. "I couldn't be more excited. We want them to succeed. I want to see blue bikes all over downtown. We're going to paint the town blue with these bikes."
 
Before residents get their pedal time, Coast Bike Share  will assemble more blue bicycles at a warehouse on Franklin Street. But ahead of the August launch, memberships are available for purchase.
 
They include a special $99 annual membership that comes with 90 minutes of ride time per day instead of the standard 60 minute ride, and a free helmet.
 
Daily ride costs will be $5, monthly memberships, $30, and annual memberships, $79. Reservations will be available on the spot via a keypad on the bicycle, online or by phone.
 
The bicycles weigh in at a relatively light 39 pounds, well below the industry standard of 51 pounds. Cruising speed is 11 miles per hour. They have baskets in the front and operate with a shaft drive rather than greasy chains. "They are very easy to ride," says Eric Trull, Coast's program manager.
 
The bike share system, and its tech savvy bicycles, are from New York City-based Social Bicycles which also has programs in Phoenix, Orlando and San Francisco. Tampa's program is managed by Miami-based Cyclehop which has 20 years experience in the cycling industry.
 
Residents can keep their eyes peeled for "coming soon" signs that will be placed at rental hubs including Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park and City Hall. As the program expands, Coast officials anticipate adding kiosks in the SoHo district, Tampa Heights, Seminole Heights and Westshore. The University of South Florida plans to launch its own bike-share program, Trull says.
 
Advertising opportunities also are available for small businesses and other organizations that want to sponsor a bicycle kiosk. For information send an email to this address.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn

Tampa General Hospital Designs Prediabetes Education Program

A new community outreach program at Tampa General Hospital is designed to prevent diabetes and other health conditions by identifying those at risk before the diseases take effect.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated over 79 million Americans age 20 and older have a condition known as prediabetes. Most do not realize they have the condition because their symptoms are not as severe as those with diabetes. It is a serious health condition that increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

Risk factors can include: being a woman who has had a baby over nine pounds in weight at birth, having a parent, sister
or brother with diabetes, being under 65 years of age and getting little to no exercise and being 45 years of age or older.

Recognizing the need in the community, Tampa General Hospital (TGH) is offering free educational sessions to help those at risk to achieve optimal health through lifestyle choices such as diet and exercise. The program involves 16 weekly sessions followed by eight monthly support group meetings.

"We’d like to teach people the skills to prevent developing diabetes," says Tamika Powe, Community Health Educator for TGH, adding that the benefits can trickle down to family members as well. "Hopefully they’re taking the information they learn in this program back home to their families to help everyone make better choices."

The program is funded by TGH and is limited to 12 registrants per class in order to maximize effectiveness. The next session begins in September at locations in Tampa Palms and South Tampa. Participants must meet qualifying criteria.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Tamika Powe, Tampa General Hospital

Crisis Center Asks Youth To 'Drop An F-Bomb' In New Campaign

In a new effort to curb human trafficking in the Tampa Bay region, teens are being asked to drop the f-bomb, the "f" standing for "friend."

The campaign is a grassroots effort led by the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay in partnership with the Florida Coalition Against Human Trafficking (FCAHT) and Dunn&Co, a Tampa-based advertising agency that took on the project pro bono.

The tagline is designed to immediately grab the attention of teens through social media and events, asking them to stand up for friends touched by human trafficking to get them help. A website and a social media campaign (#fbomb211) list ways a pimp typically targets teens with warning signs such as a young girl dating an older man, buying things she can’t afford, or acting secretive, depressed or afraid. Friends of potential victims are encouraged to talk to their friend and seek help through a confidential call to 2-1-1.

The campaign will also include guerrilla marketing techniques such as hangers placed in dressing rooms of stores where teens frequently shop.

"If we can help to prevent one or more girls from being trafficked, then this campaign will have been a huge success," says Crisis Center CEO David Braughton.

According to the FBI, an estimated 200,000 people in the U.S. are trafficked each year, mostly young girls. The average age a girl enters into prostitution is 12.

Most of the girls entering into trafficking situations had friends at one time who might have noticed they were wearing nicer clothes or jewelry, or spending lots of time with an older man. The campaign is targeted at those friends who can make a difference early on, noting that the victims are often vulnerable and don’t realize what’s happening until it’s too late.

"If we can identify these issues early on and a friend can call, then we can do something about it," says Braughton.

The campaign is already catching on. Braughton’s high school daughter tried it out with stickers on her car, and has received questions about it.

The Crisis Center’s Women in Action group is funding the campaign, along with funds given to FCAHT Founder Anna Rodriguez from the Tampa Bay Lightning’s Community Hero award.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: David Braughton, Crisis Center of Tampa Bay

Fitness Website Helps Users Find Their YES!

Fitness is the new craze. Everywhere you look you hear about someone running a race, reaching a fitness goal or buying the latest gadget to track their progress.
 
Lakeland-based Make YES! Happen is a hub for all things fitness, with the goal of making things easier and more accessible to both novice and advanced fitness buffs.  The site defines YES! as “that moment when aspiration and inspiration come to fruition in exuberant success.”  

The concept was developed in 2008 when CEO Kevin Transue (also known as Captain YES!) was a financial planner training for a half iron man triathlon in his spare time. The experience made him realize how fragmented the event and fitness industry is. He wanted to create a stadium concept of sorts, to help people stay motivated and support others with common interests.

"I want one location where I can see how many calories I’ve burned and how far I run," says Transue. "At the same time I want to connect with others who are like me."

The idea became reality in 2012 when Transue connected with co-founder Scott Parker to create the site, which is expected to officially launch toward the end of June.

The team hopes to help users find their YES! moment through education, guidance, mentoring, accountability, interaction and rewards.

Users will be able to connect their fitness devices such as Fit Bit or Run Keeper into one location to easily access statistics such as calories burned or run times. They will also connect with others with similar fitness interests for motivation and support. Through the event portal, they can find out which events their friends are participating in. Nonprofits that run fitness-related events will be able to use the fundraising platform to easily capture funds and attract runners. The coaching portal will allow fitness coaches to access information for their clients and make comments about their workouts.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Kevin Transue, Make Yes Happen

Stonehenge Growth Equity Partners Invests In Mobile Medical Help System

Stonehenge Growth Equity Partners (SGEP) recently invested in MobileHelp, a leading provider of M-PERS, or Mobile-Personal Emergency Response System, technology based in Boca Raton.

A Tampa-based investment firm, SGEP focuses on growth stage companies that use technology to solve a business problem, concentrating on the Southeastern United States. The company typically invests $1M to $5M per company, allowing them to assist growing companies that might not meet the minimum funding requirements of larger investors.

SGEP Managing Partner Steven Lux moved to Tampa in 1999 to open an investment office of Bank One, which later became Stonehenge Capital Company and then SCEP. Lux and his team were looking for Florida-based companies to invest in, and chose Tampa because of the ease of travel to major cities across the state. Current investments include Dixie Southern, a custom steel fabricator in Bradenton, Health Integrated, a medical care management company in Tampa and Ottlite, a lighting company in Tampa.

MobileHelp was a natural fit for the firm’s focus on companies that use technology to meet a need or improve a product. The personal response system, which enables someone to contact a call center in the event medical assistance is needed, has been around for a long time. What differentiates MobileHelp’s product is the wireless component, allowing people to take the device anywhere they go. The device also has a GPS component which allows for constant tracking of the individual, as well as fall detection technology.

"We’re seeing a lot of companies that are able to advance and progress much further with lower amounts of capital than they would have five or six years ago because of the use of technology," says Lux. "It’s exciting to be in the Tampa Bay area. We continue to see good growth opportunities here."

Stonehenge currently has $40 million in capital under management and is looking to expand that to $65 - $70 million within the next 4 – 5 years.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Steven Lux, Stonehenge Growth Equity Partners

St. Joseph's Hospital-North Hosts Tampa's First Robotic-Assisted, Single-Site Hysterectomy

A physician at St. Joseph’s Hospital-North is the first in Tampa to perform a relatively new, innovative option for a hysterectomy.

Dr. Pamela Twitty, OBGYN at The Women’s Group, says she is happy to be the first physician in Tampa to perform a robotic-assisted single site-hysterectomy.  Hysterectomies are the second most common surgery performed in America on women and are often used to treat serious conditions such as endometriosis, excessive bleeding or fibroids.

In a traditional hysterectomy, a doctor makes a five- to seven-inch incision, leaving a noticeable scar and resulting in an average of one to two months or recovery time. The new procedure, called the da Vinci robotic-assisted single site surgery, makes a single, one inch incision. The results are less pain and scarring, a shortened hospital stay and quicker return to normal activities.

A unique feature of the robotic assistance is the control provided to the physician. The doctor can control the surgical instruments using a console in the operating room, eliminating the need to coordinate one or more assistants to help with instrumentation.  

Robotic-assisted surgery technology has been used for almost 10 years and started with general surgeons for gall bladder surgery. It has become an option for gynecological surgeries within the past two years. What’s innovative about the da Vinci procedure is the single incision, allowing for minimal scarring and a quicker recovery.

"I’ve been a big fan for as long as I’ve been in medicine of staying innovative and using safe and new technologies," says Dr. Twitty. "I’m truly thrilled that it’s an option we can offer now."

The procedure can be used for other gynecological surgeries such as on the fallopian tubes or ovaries. As advancements continue, it could expand to other areas of general medicine.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Dr. Pamela Twitty, The Woman's Group

Stay Smart Solutions Launches Accessibility Pilot Project In Tampa

An Ohio-based company is running a test pilot project in Tampa to help medical providers offer a safer environment for clients and help people with diabilities caused by aging or medical conditions to more easily navigate their own homes.

Stay Smart Solutions has a three-step approach to construction and renovation modifications: assess, recommend, modify. First, they work with patients and healthcare providers to perform a comprehensive environment assessment. Next, an Occupational Therapist recommends modifications that make the most sense for the individual. Finally, a modification team installs the products.

The innovative approach is designed to make transitiions in living more successful, ultimately improving safety for patients and group home residents, while allowing individuals to remain in their own homes when possible.

"It’s not just about installing things. It’s about looking at it clinically from the inside and out to see if it’s the best thing for the customer," says Nina Corsi, director of market development for Stay Smart.

Stay Smart Solutions recognized the need after observing that many modifications to homes and businesses don't fit those challenged by accessibility issues. Simply installing items like grab bars doesn't help without first getting guidance to make sure the placement works properly for the person or people served.

The company began in 2013 with the pilot project taking place now in Tampa through building contractors and DIY stores.  

One of the company’s first clients was a gentleman who had a stroke and was returning home after several months of rehab. His wife purchased a grab bar for the shower and was planning to place it on the right side. Stay Smart’s Occupational Therapist visited the home to see how the patient was functioning. During her visit, she asked how he gets in and out of the tub. Noticing that he leans to the left, she recommended the bar go on that side. She then watched him walk down the hallway and noticed he was leaning to the right. To assist with this, custom bars were installed in the hallway that match the design of the house. 

If the initial pilot is successful, the company plans to expand to Orlando and eventually cover the State of Florida.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Nina Corsi, Stay Smart Solutions

Florida Hospital Carrollwood Honored For Sustainability

Florida Hospital Carrollwood was recently recognized for its efforts to decrease consumption of fuel, water and energy.

The Hospital received the Green Business Designation from The Sustany Foundation and the City of Tampa. The program recognizes efforts of Tampa-based businesses in energy and natural gas consumption, water consumption, fuel consumption, solid waste and recycling.

Through its green initiative, launched in 2011, the Hospital has been able to save 2.4 million kilowatts of energy and 583,307 gallons of water, among other savings. Specific efforts include replacing incandescent light bulbs with more energy efficient options and purchasing only ENERGY STAR products. A partnership with Stericycle allowed them to identify recycling opportunities, leading to 30,683 lbs of recycling. They also implemented employee-focused programs such as recycling education, designated parking spaces for fuel efficient vehicles and a Green Team to help review their progress and develop new ideas.

"We believe strongly that we’re here to benefit the community," says Florida Hospital CEO Joe Johnson. "We want to do whatever we can to minimize the impact to our landfills and our environment."

The Green Business Designation process involves businesses completing a set of specific metrics including materials recycled, percent of employees that carpool, ongoing hours of energy and water conservation and training and business-generated metrics.

The Hospital responded to a recent challenge by Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn and is the only hospital to receive the designation thus far. The challenge was first identified by a hospital employee who championed it internally. "I knew it was a challenge we needed to accept," says Johnson.
 
Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Joe Johnson, Florida Hospital Carrollwood

First Fit Provides Community Approach To Health, Fitness

A new model for getting fit has arrived in the Tampa Bay region that combines a small group feel with high-intensity exercises for maximum impact.

Founded in 2013, Tampa-based First Fit Health and Fitness Studio was created by Co-Owners Jim White and Joey Graham.

A lifetime fitness buff, White worked at several big box fitness studios before realizing he wanted to provide something different. At most larger studios, customers are given an initial orientation and then left on their own. Some may hire a private trainer, but for others affordability and the intimidation factor make this out of reach. White wanted to provide a community feeling, taking the quality of functional training and coupling it with equipment that’s easy to operate. A mutual friend introduced White to Tampa native and NBA professional Graham, and the two took the concept to market.

First Fit delivers high intensity interval training, or HIIT. Customers perform a specific exercise at a high intensity for 30 seconds. They then take a short 15 – 25 second break and then start another exercise. This process drives up metabolic rates and keeps them higher for approximately 12 hours after completing the workout, allowing for more calorie burning. Customers work out in groups of 14 people, providing a community effect.

"When people are in a group setting, they’re much more supportive, much more secure and have a whole lot more fun," says White.

Graham has a particular interest in using the gyms for summer camps for youth. Having done several camps in the Tampa Bay area, Graham always found it difficult to find gym space. He also has an interest in the nutrition side, which goes hand in hand with fitness.  

"We want to promote health and wellness for all the young kids in the Hillsborough area, and everywhere." says Graham.

Another unique aspect of the studio is its location. The first branch of First Fit opened February15 inside Westfield Citrus Park in Tampa. The mall location provides convenience as well as ample parking.

The company hopes to open more mall-based locations in the near future. They intend to hire Fitness Instructors and Assistant Management positions within the next 60 days.

A grand opening will be held March 29 from 11 am to 3 pm.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Jim White, Joey Graham, First Fit Health and Fitness Studio

USF Researchers Discover Potential New Therapy For Psychological Disorders

Researchers at USF Health may have found a more viable treatment for patients with neuropsychiatric illnesses, such as bipolar disorder.

Currently, FDA-approved lithium carbonate is one of the oldest and most widely used drugs to treat these illnesses. The drug, however, comes with a major drawback -- toxicity. There are alternatives on the market, but none have the same efficacy without the side effects, which include hand tremors, vomiting, diarrhea, weight gain and thyroid problems.

A team of researchers at the University of South Florida recently discovered a previously untested lithium salicylate (an alternative salt form) while working on a collaborative endeavor with a chemistry professor. The group used crystal engineering techniques to change the component of the new solid forms of lithium and published a salicylate containing co-crystal. This prompted researcher Adam Smith to wonder what other lithium salts could do.

The downside to current lithium therapy is that it’s eliminated very rapidly from the body. Therefore, patients have to take it once or twice daily to achieve optimum absorption levels, leading to potential toxicity. The new therapy has the potential to stay in the body for up to 48 hours, leading to a decrease in the number of pills taken. By modifying the dosing regiment, researchers hope to improve patient compliance and reduce the potential for side effects.

"We hope that these findings lead to a more effective lithium therapy,"says Adam Smith, Ph.D., postdoctoral fellow at the Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair at USF Health.

Animals trials have shown promise thus far. Next steps are to conduct additional animal trials that more closely mimic reality with multiple doses and then begin human trials.  

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Adam Smith, PhD., USF Health
139 health Articles | Page: | Show All
Share this page
0
Email
Print
Signup for Email Alerts