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Clearwater boat manufacturer adding jobs after merger

After a merger, one of the largest catamaran builders in the United States is ramping up its Pinellas County headquarters and marina with plans to double its staff.

The Seattle-based Coastal Marine initiated the merger with the Clearwater-based Endeavour Catamaran Corporation because it was looking to increase its market base.

The new company is called Endeavour Corporation.

“We saw a potential for both brands,” explains Rob Harty, Endeavour Corporation’s President. “We used to have boats only up to 42 feet and now we have boats up to 50 feet. The brands complement each other.”

Coastal Marine was founded in Hong Kong in 2008 during the economic downturn. As the company looked to scale upwards, it moved to Seattle in 2012. Now it has resettled in Clearwater, where Endeavour Catamaran had an established name in boatbuilding.

“If we’re going to be in the United States, the Florida market is 10x larger than anywhere else in the country,” he says. “This is the mecca of boating.”

Endeavour, which is producing luxury and performance catamarans, is looking to double its local staff of 20, possibly in the next year. It is seeking skilled boat builders: people experienced in carpentry, mechanics, electrical, and fiberglass technology. It also is looking for office staff in sales, administration and marketing.

The company may hire at the entry level, train workers, and move them up in the company. “That’s always how I found it to work best,” he says. “Some of our needs are bigger than entry level.”

Experience in a related field may be helpful. “A boat’s very much like a house,” he says.

Endeavour Catamaran, which dates back to the 1970s, already had an extremely experienced staff that has been with the company for decades, he notes.

“When owners bring their EndeavourCats in for upgrading or maintenance, they’re likely to have the same staff who built their boat performing that service,” he says.

The merger occurred as a result of a successful collaboration between the two companies, which both were industry leaders in the design, manufacture and sales of power catamarans.

“The collaboration is a win-win for all involved. Blending the 40-year history and stellar reputation of EndeavourCats with the innovative spirit of ArrowCat has made the Endeavour Corporation a power cat powerhouse,” Harty says.

Endeavour is operating its manufacturing facility at 3703 131st Ave. N. in Clearwater and a marina at 13030 Gandy Blvd., St. Petersburg.

We’ve made a substantial investment in our 60,000 square foot manufacturing facility in Clearwater, where we’re planning to introduce and build two new entry-level boat models in the next six months,” Harty says.

“American Yacht and Custom, our servicing center, is due to open by the end of the year, thanks to a significant investment. We’re excited to offer top-notch boatyard services as well as custom rigging and detailing,” he says.

“We’re really proud of our new, massive, state-of-the-art paint facility. As the largest in the region, it’s certainly going to advance the use of composite coatings in the boating industry,” he adds.

The company’s boats are typically used for expeditions. “Our boats are used by people who really want a more all-purpose boat,” Harty says. “You can stay on this boat for extended periods of time protected from the elements.”

The catamarans are stable, high-performing, comfortable and convenient, he says.

“These boats are like Humvees. If there was ever a four-wheel drive monster boat, that is what we build,” he says. “People are not afraid to take it anywhere.”

The semi-custom boats sell for $289,000 up to $1 million.

Endeavor will be producing luxury catamarans under the Endeavor TrawlerCat brand and performance catamarans with the ArrowCat name. Its Endeavour 340 model, the result of collaboration between Coastal Marine and Endeavor Catamaran Corporation, will be featured this fall, offering a blend of simplicity, elegance, and efficiency.

What does the future hold? “Down the road we’ll expand to offer sailing catamarans,” Harty says.


Diary of an Entrepreneur: Tony DiBenedetto, Tribridge

Editor's note: Due to the threat of Hurricane Irma to the Tampa Bay Area, this event has been postponed until November 14th, 2017, same time, same place as described below.

Tampa Bay Innovation Center, an innovation and entrepreneurship center for technology businesses, will hold its quarterly “Diary of an Entrepreneur” program, part of the TECH Talk series, on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, at 8:30 a.m. at Microsoft Headquarter offices, 5426 Bay Center Dr., Suite 700, Tampa.
 
The September Diary of an Entrepreneur program, “From startup to public company: the strategic investments that fueled the growth of Tribridge,” will be presented by Tony DiBenedetto, Tribridge chairman and CEO. 

DiBenedetto will discuss leading Tampa-based Tribridge from a startup in 1998 to a $180 million software, services and cloud business before recently being acquired by DXC, the world’s leading independent, end-to-end IT services company. He will share his journey on growing Tribridge through outside capital as well as strategic investments in developing culture, talent and innovation, according to a news release.

83 Degrees asked DiBenedetto a few questions to give our readers a sneak peak at the discussion. Here’s the result:

83 Degrees: What advice do you have for a young, tech startup today?

Tony DiBenedetto: Here are a few things I’ve learned from being an entrepreneur:
  • Passion. You have to really love the product or service you are selling. Starting a business is a 24/7 job and can put a lot of stress on your relationships. Also be prepared to get turned down -- rejection is part of it. Passion for what you do will help you overcome the personal obstacles.
  • Good People. Whether you need 1 or 300 employees, you’ve got to be able to attract talent. What will make someone take the risk in joining a start-up? Some people are attracted to the business idea itself, for some it’s leadership and for other it’s compensation. I would start with people who share your values and then evaluate their skills. 
  • Cash is King. Having a great idea for a new business isn’t enough. You need a well capitalized plan with plenty of cash. Take the time to think through the business model and what the costs truly are. Go into it with low expectations of revenue while you ramp up.  
  • Differentiate. Find an underserved market, and distinguish yourself from the competition. Even if it’s a large market, you can still identify a need or a gap that needs to be filled. You have to want to make the product or service better than what is already out there in order to truly differentiate your business.
83D: Please discuss the importance of innovation and how it has contributed to Tribridge’s success story.

TD: Technology is a highly competitive market so we have to be innovative and take risks. Entrepreneurial spirit has been one of our core values since Tribridge was started. Many of our software and cloud solutions came from ideas from our team members. We also use the fast fail model to help drive innovation. It’s a cultural movement that empowers people to implement new ideas. But if the idea doesn’t work, you pull the plug and quickly move on rather than trying to salvage something to the detriment of your customers, team members and the business. You have to build a culture of open communication and collaboration where team members feel comfortable generating a lot of ideas. Then you take action – launch the new service or pilot program – establish the goals for success early and measure them often. 

There is no fee to attend the Tampa Bay Innovation Center TECH Talk series, but space is limited. Advance registration is suggested.

BizConnect@Platt: Business owners learn, network at public library

Business people like networking, and often meet and greet at Tampa Bay Area hotel conference rooms. But now they have a new venue: the public library.

“We’re making an effort to reach out to kind of a non-traditional library population,” explains Business Librarian Chris Sturgeon, who founded BizConnect@Platt, a program attracting business owners to the Jan Kaminis Platt Regional Library at 3910 S. Manhattan Ave., Tampa. “They don’t think it’s a place to work on their business. ... We try to dispel that myth.”

He’s one of five business librarians in Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library system. Hired last year, Sturgeon’s job is to reach out to businesses and let them know the library is a free resource to them.

“The whole idea as to open up the doors,” he says. “There’s a demand here [for networking]. Let’s try it. Let’s just make it open to everyone.”

The library offers free digital access with a public library card to business owners’ databases like that offered by Reference USA, or to the training website Lynda.com. Readers also can access free digital subscriptions to magazines like Forbes.

Out-of-county residents can enjoy services by paying $100 annually for a library card.

“A lot of information is available online, but it’s not all quality information,” he explains. “That’s where we try to come in.”

Changes were precipitated by the digital revolution. “Our circulation numbers are still very high for books. The digital content is almost equally as popular,” he says, adding the Tampa-Hillsborough libraries have a “pretty sizable” ebook collection for businesses.

Part of the draw is the option of using the library as a temporary working space. “They can come in on a walk-in basis and reserve one of the private study rooms,” he continues. “There are plenty of places for them to plug in. ... They can’t book it in advance.”

Every first Friday at 8 a.m., about 25 business owners meet at the Jan Platt Library to hear a speaker and network. “We get a different crowd almost every time,” he says. “Our speakers have all been very generous with their time.”

At the September 1 meeting, Gary LoDuca, Founder of Thoughtful Wealth Management and Tax Advisors, a certified financial planner, will be providing tips on businesses taxes. In August Mike Harting, owner/operator of St. Petersburg’s 3 Daughters Brewing, told his business story.     

The events are free and open to the public. No registration is required. Check the calendar for upcoming events here.


Tampa Bay Area job fairs offer options for professionals, veterans and those in crisis

Chris Godier was serving in the U.S. Navy in Japan when the September 11 Twin Towers’ attacks occurred in 2001. Now a retired lieutenant commander living in Brandon, he’s planning to recognize and repay military veterans and their families through a career fair tailored to their needs.

“We advocate for veterans and their dependent spouses, children, for the issues that are plaguing their employment,” Godier says.

Godier’s business, Veterans and other Important Personnel Recruiting, is holding its first career fair September 12. “I picked the date on purpose. It’s to bring awareness to the veteran,” he says.

But the event is open to all jobseekers. “We want to help everybody. That’s absolutely our passion,” Godier adds.

After talking to veterans about job fairs, he’s planned an event that includes simultaneous instruction on topics like transition to civilian life, recruiters’ tips, preparing resumes, writing follow-up letters and networking. He’s also serving cake to help attendees expand their network.

“We’re trying to serve some cake and get them to talk to someone they never talked to before,” he explains.

Recruiters from some 35 companies including Allstate, Baycare, Brandon Ford, Coca Cola, the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office and Verizon, will be on hand. James A Haley Hospital will provide assistance signing up for benefits.

The fair, which is free, will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 800 Centennial Lodge Drive, Brandon.

More job fairs

Local jobseekers have plenty of job fairs to choose from in September. On September 14, the Emergency Care Help Organization (ECHO) is holding its fifth job fair catered to eastern Hillsborough County residents in crisis.

The event is planned from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Boys and Girls Club, 213 N. Knights Ave., Brandon.

ECHO serves residents of Brandon, Dover, Lithia, Riverview, Gibsonton, Thonotosassa, Seffner and the Tampa zip codes 33610 and 33619.

Sharmaine Burr, ECHO’s Director of Social Services, say the organization helps a diverse crowd, from veterans, to people who lost their homes to fire, to people just released from jail, and those with four-year degrees who have been victimized by life’s circumstances.

“We don’t discriminate by income. All they need is an ID, social [security number] and proof of address,” she says. “We help them. Anyone that falls short, we lift them up.”

Burr strives to help individuals holistically. “I can get you the job, but can you keep that job? What’s in your life that can keep you from going to work?” she asks.

While there will be jobs in assorted industries, medically related jobs will be prevalent at the fair. “We have a bunch of jobs for the CNAs, RNs and LPNs. We also have direct care staff,” she says.

The free event will include support agencies such as veteran services.

ECHO also offers help preparing for the job fair as well. A workshop is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. August 31 at ECHO's Opportunity Center at 507 N. Parsons Ave., Brandon. Career coaching, mock interviews and resume reviews are available.

Here are some other jobs fairs slated throughout Tampa Bay in the coming weeks.

• Florida Job Link is planning its 2017 Career Fair -- Tampa/Brandon/Lakeland from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. September 13 at Clarion Inn and Suites Conference Center, 9331 E. Adamo Drive, Tampa. Its goal is to connect the best candidates with companies, regardless of race, religion or other designation. Jobs will be in sales, management, customer service, insurance, education, government, I.T., human resources, engineering, clerical, blue-collar careers and more. The event is free and space is limited.

• A job fair and resource expo is planned from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. September 7 at American Legion POST 5, 3810 W. Kennedy Blvd., Tampa. The event by Red Carpet USA Entertainment and Events is free and 30+ employers are anticipated. There will be free parking, free resume review and free resume writing classes every hour, plus on-site computers. 

Coast-to-Coast Career Fairs is hosting its Tampa Job Fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. September 11 at Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore Airport, 700 N. Westshore Blvd., Tampa. Jobseekers should arrive at 11 a.m. sharp and sign in to meet hiring managers. Professionals with varying levels of experience are encouraged to attend. Register to save your spot and view participating companies in advance.

• Kaiser University is holding Tampa Career Fair 2017 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. September 12 at 5002 W. Waters Ave., Tampa. The event is open to students at the private, regionally accredited institution, as well as to graduates and community jobseekers. The fair will feature employers in multiple sectors such as business, legal, technology, allied health, sports medicine and fitness, and criminal justice fields.

United Career Fairs has scheduled its Tampa Career Fair from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. September 13 at Doubletree by Hilton Tampa Westshore Airport, 4500 West Cypress Street, Tampa. Jobs are in sales, business development, marketing, customer service, and retail and sales management. Jobseekers are advised to arrive at 6 p.m. sharp with plenty of resumes. The event is free.

• Tampa Bay Job and Career Fair kicks off at 10 a.m. September 18 at The Coliseum in St. Petersburg. The event by Tampa Bay Expos runs until 3 p.m.; admission is free and registration isn’t required. Fifty employers with immediate hiring needs will be on hand, so come ready to be hired! Jobseekers are advised to bring 20 copies of their resume, wear business attire, and have a positive attitude.

• The Congressman Gus Bilirakis Job Fair, with an emphasis on manufacturing and healthcare, is slated from 9 a.m. to noon September 26 at Pasco-Hernando State College Porter Campus at Wiregrass Ranch, 2727 Mansfield Blvd., Wesley Chapel. The event is free and all are welcome.


Local artists learn business skills at TEC Garage

Creative Pinellas and TEC Garage are collaborating on a program to help artists and creative professionals learn the entrepreneurial skills needed to be successful in today’s marketplace.

Thanks to funding from Creative Pinellas, artists and arts-related organizations in Pinellas County can apply to participate at no cost in TEC Garage’s nine-week Co.Starters Program that begins September 5.

TEC Garage is part of the Tampa Bay Innovation Center, an innovation and entrepreneurship center for tech businesses that is managed by STAR-TEC Enterprises, Inc., a not-for-profit Florida corporation “whose goal is to foster jobs and promote economic development through assistance and support programs.” Located in downtown St. Petersburg, TEC Garage houses co-working and incubation space, as well as mentoring programs for emerging tech companies and entrepreneurs.

This will be the third time that Creative Pinellas has collaborated with TEC Garage to offer the course to the local arts community, says Barbara St. Clair, executive director of Creative Pinellas. Creative Pinellas is a nonprofit agency supporting the arts community with grant programs, events and activities.

The agency’s new emerging artist grant was featured in a March 21 story in 83 Degrees Media.

St. Clair says she first learned about TEC Garage when she inquired about the program’s co-working space before joining Creative Pinellas in 2016.

“I was impressed with the quality of the program,” says St. Clair. “Then after I was hired at Creative Pinellas, I met with Tonya Elmore, President and CEO of the Tampa Bay Innovation Center, and we agreed that tech entrepreneurs had a lot in common with artists. Both are creative, independent, self-starters and on the leading edge of change. We decided if there was ever an opportunity for us to combine resources we would do that.”

About 20 artists, including Carlos Culbertson, a St. Petersburg mural artist better known as Zulu Painter, have participated in the Co-Starters Program since Creative Pinellas began offering funding for the course.

“Several artists have told us that it was one of the best programs that they had ever attended -- a life-changing experience,” says St. Clair.

Originally developed by an organization in Chattanooga, TN., Co.Starters is now being duplicated in cities across the U.S. with the mission of teaching entrepreneurs how to turn a creative idea into a thriving and sustainable business. 

According to Tampa Bay Innovation Center president Tonya Elmore, the partnership between Creative Pinellas and TEC Garage provides a “unique approach to the integration of the arts with entrepreneurship.”
 
“The Co.Starters program allows creatives to explore the probability of turning their passion into a thriving venture,” says Elmore. “The biggest take away from participants is that it saved them countless hours and mistakes of trying to launch their business on their own. The added value was being in the room with like-minded individuals experiencing similar roadblocks.“

St. Petersburg’s program is taught by Chris Paradies, president of Paradies Law, a boutique law firm specializing in entrepreneurs and small businesses. JJ Roberts, director of TEC Garage, is a guest speaker in the program. Participants meet once a week for three hours in the evening to discuss topics ranging from team building, problem solving and competition to understanding the customer, identifying the right message and marketing and understanding licenses, revenue, legal issues and distribution.

AirSpew: Teams build prototypes, compete for cash

Good will missions usually take a pilot, a co-pilot and an assistant to toss pamphlets out of the plane about an impending drop of food, medicine and supplies. But thanks to the Tampa-based OpenWERX, the process might become cheaper and easier.

It's latest challenge, AirSpew, has attracted 30 teams creating prototypes that spew information. They're vying for a $10,000 grand prize.

“We’re just trying to think outside the box, what else would make it easier for war fighters to communicate to a crowd,” explains Jeff Young, one of OpenWERX’s creators.

The challenge is the latest in a series by OpenWERX, which was formed nearly a year ago to help the public help the military and others. “If purely based on participation, this will be our biggest one,” he says.

The contest is called AirSpew because teams are making prototype devices that literally spew out literature or a verbal message using a speaker or radio. Teams also are working on mounts to attach the prototypes to the popular Phantom 4 drones.

The devices would reduce flight time and personnel hours.
 In addition to helping with good will missions, the invention might be used for law enforcement, Young adds.

Prototypes were due August 21; judging and awards will be on September 7. The first place team receives $10,000, while second place winners claim $5,000 and the third prize winners take away $3,000.

OpenWERX initially held month-long competitions, but decided to switch to quarterly contests because the teams asked for more time to work. The change also allows OpenWERX to offer larger cash prizes.

Challenges appeal to what he describes as the “maker community,” folks that like to use their hands to make things on their off hours. They may be engineers by trade, but most teams have people with differing skill sets. Some are students.

“I’ve seen definitively an outstanding turnout from folks like the University of South Florida, their engineering students have definitely been involved," he adds.

Ideas are submitted by war fighters and screened to see which ones are most suited to the program. The topic for the next challenge has not yet been chosen, and will be announced at September’s event.

Interested parties can sign up for alerts here.

OpenWERX is part of the Ybor City-based SOFWERX, named for its connection to Special Operations Forces. SOFWERX is a place the public can go to share ideas for what might become tomorrow’s hot inventions.


Think Anew, Superior Precast, announce new jobs in Tampa Bay Area

An innovative, Mississippi-based tech company serving the healthcare market has opened its first Florida office in Tampa and is hiring 20 with a budget of $1.2 million.

“What we desire is to make a call to Florida’s and Tampa’s best and brightest,” says Don Glidewell, President, Founder and CEO of the Flowood-based Think Anew. “Their only limitation is how big they want to dream, and how hard they are wiling to work to achieve those dreams.”

Think Anew opened in June at 1413 Tech Blvd., Suite 213, in Pinebrooke Office Park in the Interstate 75 corridor of eastern Hillsborough County. It is expanding its eight-member staff to include entry-level support staff as well as individuals in engineering, tech administration, network administration, field services, development or programming, web development, and marketing and sales.

“We are extremely competitive with our salaries,” he says.

Plans already are underway to double its 3,500-square-feet offices as part of a $100,000 investment into the community.

Glidewell was impressed with the area’s passion to recruit employers and the growing tech workforce. “This tech talent growth is really starting to bubble over,” he says. “We feel like we’re in the best place to achieve our business goals.”

Glidewell expects the Tampa office, the company’s third, to become a hub for the 10-year-old company that strives to be a one-stop, tech shop targeted to the senior living, long-term healthcare sector. A government mandated switch to electronic data keeping has brought major change to the industry.

“Imagine doing everything on paper and never using a computer, and then one day your facility is filled with computers. There was no in between there,” he explains. “We handle everything: training, implementation, security, disaster preparedness.”

Among its innovative products is a BOOMBOX,TM a disaster communications system that allows a healthcare facility to continue to chart medications and produce electronic health records with a 16-pound box emitting wireless Internet. It also offers phone calling, video conferencing and HAM radio. The company is accepting pre-orders for the $299-a-month emergency service.

“We’re a group of creators. We love to create new things,” he adds. “We’re really good at listening to our client’s pain points.”

Gov. Rick Scott announced Think Anew’s expansion into Florida August 8.

Here are some other companies hiring in the Tampa Bay region.

• A new Florida Department of Transportation supplier, Superior Precast, has decided to locate in Dade City in 62,777 square feet at Dade City Business Center. It plans to hire 100 people from the communities in the area, 27 of them by September.

Superior Precast makes precast concrete products for major road projects in the state. It is working with CareerSource Pasco-Hernando to recruit, hire and train its workforce. Salaries are close to 125 percent of the county’s average annual wage.

Jobs they are looking to fill include Plant Manager, Quality Control Manager, Office Manager, Administrative Assistant, Quality Control Technician, Forklift Operators, Carpenter, Welder, and Precast Production Workers. Jobseekers can apply here.

• The Tampa-based BlueLine Associates is seeking a Technical Recruiter with a bachelor’ degree and/or relevant experience in the staffing industry.

Tops Barber Shop on Temple Terrace Highway in Tampa is looking for a barber/hair stylist to cut men and women's hair. A barber or cosmetology license is required, along with at least two years of experience. The barber/stylist, who will work as an independent contractor, must know how to shave with a straight blade and hot lather. The position is for 36 to  38 hours a week, with Sundays and Mondays off.

Sun Trust is looking to hire and train a full-time universal banker for Pinellas County. Applicants should have at least a high school diploma and its equivalent plus one year of experience in service, sales, cash handling or payment transaction for another firm. The individual would be trained while waiting for a permanent assignment.

Linder Industrial Machinery Company has an opening for a payroll specialist in its Plant City Office. Applicants should have an associate’s degree and at least five year’s of payroll experience, plus excellent communications skills and proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel and other related software.


If you are hiring skilled workers with five or less years of experience, drop us a line.


Tech Bytes: TechHire Boot Camp and more tech-related tidbits in Hillsborough County

Students were issued dog tags. They used an original, comic book-styled text. From their classroom in a previously vacant storefront at Tampa’s University Mall, they studied core concepts needed for technology jobs.

In the end, some 10 students graduated in mid-July from the first USF-TechHire Technology Boot Camp taught by Clinton Daniel, an instructor in Business Analytics and Information Systems at the University of South Florida’s College of Business.

“The second Boot Camp starts the week after Labor Day,” Daniel says, adding they are working with Metropolitan Ministries to supply a place. “We still don’t have a permanent home. That makes it tough.”

After a rigorous 30-day program, the first graduates are being recognized August 30 at a TechHire talk slated from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. at USF CONNECT Galleria.

“We’re taking a different tack,” says Kelley Sims, a spokeswoman for the organizers, !p Potential Unleashed, a multi-jurisdictional district in north Tampa.

The talks are part of a series of business community meetings intended to build a pipeline of tech talent in the Tampa Bay region, as part of a TechHire initiative launched by then-President Barack Obama in 2015. The program is intended to create jobs and facilitate business growth.

Ninety percent of the Boot Camp is hands on, with the balance being discussion, Daniel says. “My philosophy was if these folks are going to try to get a job, the employer most likely wants to know ‘what can you do’?” explains Daniel, who designed the curriculum and text, called Core Technical Manual.

Daniel relied on his military background to develop the practical training, presented in a non-threatening way. Students could opt to write code for their projects – or not.

Boot Camp graduates, who also could opt into a paid internship, for the most part had attended or graduated from college. “We thought maybe it would be a bunch of students that never went to college,” he acknowledges.

“Surprisingly enough, there’s a lot of people who have gone to college, and they can’t find jobs,” Daniel adds. “There’s just more demand out there for tech.”

Some 348 have enrolled in the area’s TechHire program, according to Michelle Schultz, Programs Director for CareerSource Tampa Bay and CareerSource Pinellas. Some 142 already have completed training.

In other tech news Dreamit, a top-10 ranked global accelerator and venture capital firm in New York City, has set up offices at CoWorkTampa in the historic Garcia & Vega Cigar Factory. Dreamit is preparing to launch its first UrbanTech accelerator program with eight to 10 companies in September.

The workspace will be used by out-of-town startups when they are in Tampa for parts of the program, says Andrew Ackerman, Dreamit’s Managing Director.

Our aim is to put Tampa on the map for UrbanTech innovation and, more generally, establish it as the startup hub for the Southeast U.S,” he says.

Check out more tech-related news in Tampa Bay below.

• Nominations are open for the Technology Executive of the Year, the Technology Leader of the Year and the Emerging Technology Leader of the Year awards. The Tampa Bay Technology Forum is accepting nominations until 5 p.m. August 18 for these and other awards. You can even self-nominate. Get the scoop here.

•  A weekend-long hackathon for the hospitality industry, Hack Hospitality, is scheduled August 25-27 at Station House / The Iron Yard in St. Petersburg. Teams will be working to solve real-life industry challenges – and competing for a $3,000 first-place prize. The event is being held by Startup Tampa Bay.

Homebrew Hillsborough is touring the mobile cellphone business pioneer Syniverse at 8:30 a.m. August 25. Located at 8125 Highwoods Palm Way, Tampa, Syniverse has as customers more than 1,500 cellphone carriers, enterprises and ISPs from nearly 200 different countries.

• Kunal Jain, Founder and President of Practiceforces, is the featured speaker at USF Connect’s Innovation Frame of Healthcare Ventures program from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. August 31 at the Oak View Room, 3802 Spectrum Blvd., Tampa. The talk, which is free to attend, will focus on six things that affect new healthcare ventures: structure, financing, public policy, technology, consumers and accountability.

Tampa Bay WaVE accepted 10 new companies in its latest cohort, for a total of 50 companies. The companies included Kaginger, Metasense Analytics, LLC, The SuperMom Box, Monikl, Script, MyCourtCase, Finly Tech, Farady Inc., Mahatma Technologies, and WhooshFly.

Tampa Bay Innovation Center has announced its fiscal year results: 59 clients with 207 employees, and client revenues of nearly $10.5 million. Five trademarks and three patents were filed. Of the clients, 33 were involved with the incubator; the remaining 26 were co-working clients.


Meet employers face-to-face at Tampa Bay Area job fairs

With digital job applications the rage, many jobseekers submit their resumes or applications online and wait, in hope of a reply.  But job fairs offer an opportunity to meet employers face-to-face.

“Nothing beats meeting an employer face to face. In this day and age almost all job search is done online,” asserts Mark Walker, National Sales Manager for National Career Fairs, which schedules more than 300 events in 80 cities annually. “You hope somebody reads your resume and application and gives you a call.”

Its St. Petersburg Job Fair, a live hiring event, is planned from 11 a.m to 2 p.m. August 15 at Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront, 333 1st Street South.

Preparing ahead of time can help jobseekers make the most of the opportunity. By visiting the National Career Fairs website, they can view the Event Calendar and see the logos for companies signed up for the fair.

 “None of our events are industry specific,” he adds. “We are open to all employers.”

Submitting a resume online, in addition to carrying several hard copies to the fair, is a good idea. “We compile a resume database for the event,” he says. “The employers that are at the event get the resume database.”

The website also has a job board, where employers participating in events can list openings.

The most important thing a jobseeker can do is “dress for success,” he advises.

“You cannot believe the number of people ... that show up in shorts and T-shirt instead of being dressed in nice business attire,” he says.

It’s also important to realize employers are actively recruiting -- and be prepared to answer interview questions, he adds.

Below you’ll find some other job fairs scheduled in the Tampa Bay area in August.

The Tampa Career Fair by Career Intro is slated from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. August 9 at Hilton Tampa Airport, 2225 N Lois Ave. Jobseekers can register online and submit a resume for the free event.

• A JobNewsUSA Lakeland Job Fair is slated from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. August 23 at The Lakeland Center, 701 W. Lime St. Jobseekers should be prepared for on-the-spot interviews and job offers. Online registration is available; admission and parking are free.

• Best Hire Career Fairs is holding its Tampa Job Fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. August 24 at Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore Airport, 700 N. Westshore Blvd. The fair attracts employers from a variety of industries, including accounting, advertising, biotechnology, green technology, health, pharmaceutical, publishing, telecommunications and video gaming. Hiring is done on the spot. The event is free; online registration is available.


Looking for work? Florida, Tampa Bay Area good place to be

Florida is experiencing major job growth, and the Tampa Bay Area is playing a significant role.

Florida is the best state in the nation to get a job, grow your business or start a company,” says Cissy Proctor, Executive Director of the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. “Our state continues to beat the nation’s job growth rate, and we consistently lead other large states as well.”

According to May data released by DOE, the state had positive over-the-year growth in 10 major industries, with the highest gains logged in professional and business services, education and health services, and construction. Figures show the category professional and business services gained 52,900 jobs with a $56,930 average annual wage, followed by education and health services with an increase of 34,400 jobs averaging $48,616 annually, and construction with 31,000 jobs at an average of $47,342 pay annually.

In 2016, the real Gross Domestic Product in Florida was the fastest growing among the 10 most populated states and was the fourth largest in the nation.

In June, Gov. Rick Scott announced the Sunshine State has been adding jobs at a faster rate than the country’s 10 largest states during the last year – and had experienced the second-highest private-sector job growth rate, behind Utah.

Tampa Bay logged the second highest number of new private-sector jobs among the state’s metro areas in a June report, with 41,600 new jobs in the last year. Orlando led the state with 47,800 new private-sector jobs in that time period.

Keep reading to learn more about opportunities at some Tampa Bay companies.

Corin

The global orthopedic device manufacturer Corin is expanding its U.S. headquarters in Tampa and is planning to create up to 100, new high-wage jobs by 2022. The jobs will be in marketing, operations, sales and administration.

It is expected to invest some $500,000 in the new offices.

Corin USA, a division of the British medical device company Corin Group LLC, supports business operations for the innovative orthopedics leader offering high-tech solutions to improve surgical procedures. It has relocated to 12750 Citrus Park Lane, Suite 120, Tampa.

Check for career opportunities here.

Vendita

The global technology and software company Vendita is relocating its headquarters from Toledo, OH to Tampa, and will create up to 15 new jobs by 2019. The jobs will be high-tech, high-income positions including database administrators and developers, sales professionals and administrative staff.

Vendita, which will be leasing up to 3,500 square feet, has moved into executive office space at 2503 W. Swann Ave. It is making an investment of $500,000 in the new facility.

The company offers custom solutions for Oracle and IBM products and services. Its goal is to simplify purchasing, deploying and managing clients’ IT environments.

Best in Class

Dr. Nirjhar Shah and his wife Swarna Pujari opened their Best in Class franchise in January and are planning to expand by three or four teachers for the new school year. Teachers will work in either Math, English or Chess and earn some $11-$13 an hour part-time for about six to 12 hours a week. They augment the curricula of students, the bulk of them in elementary or middle school.

Our goal is to basically build foundational skills in math and English, both reading and writing. We provide supplemental education to build foundational skills and further their learning on key concepts,” Shah says

Best in Class stresses critical thinking, problem solving and multiple choice problems not generally taught in school. Its staff of seven teaches from its New Tampa location, with fees usually ranging from $85 a month for Chess to some $120 a month for English or Math.

High schoolers have a blended curriculum that includes both onsite and online instruction.

Applicants can apply online by following this link.

Tribridge

DXC Technology has acquired the Tampa-based Tribridge, an independent integrator of Microsoft Dynamics 365, and its affiliate company, Concerto Cloud Services, solidifying its role as a leading global systems integrator for Microsoft Dynamics. Tribridge is now using the name Tribridge, a DXC Technology Company.

Terms weren’t disclosed.

“We anticipate job growth as planned. We will continue to hire across a number of high-demand positions, such as Microsoft Dynamics 365 consultants, cloud infrastructure and business development positions,” says Tribridge Spokeswoman Jennie Treby.

“By being part of a larger, global organization such as DXC Technology, we will have access to greater resources and growth opportunities for our team here in Tampa Bay and across the country,” she says.

Tribridge and Concerto Cloud Services had previously expanded their presence at One Urban Centre at Westshore, which was unrelated to the acquisition, she says.

DXC Technology, an end-to-end IT services firm, has nearly 6,000 private clients in 70 countries.


Tampa Bay startup: Washlava debuts app-enabled laundry in Tampa

The nation’s laundry industry is largely coin operated, but that may change soon thanks to a new app. The app, pioneered at a Carrollwood neighborhood laundromat in Tampa, enables laundries to ditch the quarters and rely exclusively on digital payments.

“Tampa is our first laundromat conversion,” says Washlava Founder and CEO Todd Belveal. “We do not take coins. We do not take a credit card swipe. You cannot access the store unless you download the app.”

Belveal converted the family’s Carrollwood laundry, Washlava Carrollwood, to the app this month, making it the first entirely app-enabled laundromat. It previously beta-tested the app on dorm machines at the Gainesville-based University of Florida, with students preferring the Washlava app 12 to 1 over quarters and 7 to 1 over credit cards.

It is now looking to expand into 20 markets, cities like Austin, Washington D.C., New York City, Dallas, Denver, San Francisco and Chicago. “We’re looking for urban, dense communities where there’s a heavy rental population,” he says.

Younger people also are more likely to rent and rely upon the app, which finds Washlava locations, checks for machine availability, reserves washers, accepts payment and notifies users when the laundry is done.

Belveal entered the laundry business as part of a family venture more than three years ago, when they bought a laundromat at 11819 N. Armenia Ave. for $60,000. He quickly learned laundries weren’t that easy to run. There were buckets and buckets of quarters to weigh.

He didn’t set out to make an app though, until after a burglar pried their coin machine off the wall. He decided there had to be a better way to run the business. “There has to be an app,” he thought.

Except he couldn’t find one. “I really expected to find something like Parkmobile that took a coin-based business and turned it into something digital,” he says.

Instead, he found an industry “completely untouched by modern technology,” he says.

Fortunately, Belveal was no stranger to how apps could automate a business. He’d already started Silvercar, a car rental company where customers book with a smartphone, which he later sold to Audi.

So he founded Washlava, naming it lava both for the Spanish word lava, which means wash, and the English word lava associated with heat from volcanoes.

Converting to the Washlava platform involves installing hardware into the machines for $149 each. “We simply drop our technology into their fleet of equipment, and brand it or not,” Belveal says.

Washlava keeps a percentage of gross receipts on each cycle completed. “We get paid when they get paid,” he says.

With the Carrollwood conversion behind them, the Washlava staff of 12 is making plans to convert its second and possibly third laundromat in early fall.

“After here, New York is likely second,” he says.

Plans call for hiring another 10 to 20 in the fall as the business expands into new territory, with those positions being split between Tampa and the new location. A lot of support will be provided remotely. “They don’t need to be there. They’ll be here,” he says.

Founded in 2015, Washlava has already raised some $4 million in two rounds of funding. “Our intent is to create a network of convenient locations,” he says.

Users must have a smartphone and a credit card or debit card, or alternatively a pre-paid card. “Ultimately, we’ll probably expand the number of options, but we’ll never move towards cash,” he says.

It may be a welcome change for laundromat customers who spend on average 200 quarters every month to wash and dry clothes. “There are several million vended machines that live in dorms, hotels and military bases. They’re hidden from public view, but there’s a lot of them,” he says.


New app, Script, enhances communications between educators, parents

A Tampa-based company is gaining traction in the education field with an innovative app that uses technology to ease the administrative burden on teachers. Called Script, the firm has secured funding from local partners Ark Applications and PAR Inc.

“Schools are absolutely loving it. Parents are loving it too,” says Aaron White, Co-Founder and CEO. “They don’t have to rely on little Johnny to bring home the paperwork.”

White, who worked in the tech education field in the Tampa Bay area for eight years, found Script in 2016 after recognizing the mounds of paperwork teachers were managing.

“They can’t focus on what they’re best at, which is teaching. There’s no other solution out there,” he explains. “I decided that I was going to build one.”

Along with Co-Founder and Chief Technology Officer Patrick Cahill, White has been working in beta mode to fine-tune their service with feedback from educators.

Now part of the Tampa Bay WaVE Launch program, Script will have its “first big rollout” this year, he says. Script charges a transaction fee; payment arrangements are worked out with each school.

Their immediate goal is to help with forms for field trips, parental permission slips and monetary payments.

Parents can access the program with an app through iOS, Android and the web while educators use an online dashboard. Payments can be made quickly with credit or debit cards.

“We handle all the heavy lifting technology wise,” White says.

An undisclosed amount of investor dollars will be used to develop the Tampa team and expand the company, first In Florida and then nationally. “We want to do this product really well and then look on other things,” he says.

Ark Applications is a privately held equity and consulting firm and PAR is the publisher of assessment instruments, software and related materials.

Script currently employs three, but will be adding another customer service representative, a developer and one or two sales people within the next two months.

They eventually want to manage the transfer of any document to the parent. “Right now when we hand a little paper to Johnny we don’t know if the parent sees it,” he says.


Online storytelling platform moves home base to Tampa

A Oviedo startup company, TSOLife, has relocated to downtown Tampa for support from Tampa Bay Wave and the area’s entrepreneurial ecosystem. “Tampa almost is unrivaled in Florida,” says Founder and CEO David Sawyer. “Everyone just seems to embrace the startups.”

Located at the Wave, Sawyer says it was a “driving force” in his decision to move the company here. He says he looks forward to participate in events are helpful.

Tampa Bay Wave gets it, and they offer the best of the best,” he says.

Started in 2014, TSOLife won the University Stage business competition in June at eMerge America’s Startup Competition in Miami, which drew some 13,000 people from across the world to network, compete and learn about the latest technology.

“We beat out 24 other university teams that were there for exhibiting. It was a pretty cool event,” he says.

Sawyer got the idea for the business after his grandmother, Muriel Sawyer, died. She lived in Gloucester, MA, and visited for four months in the winter, which never gave them much time to talk about how she met his grandfather, how she raised his dad, or what college was like.

“We never got to have those conversations,” he explains.

So he founded a business with Stella Parris, COO, to share family legacies online. “We really wanted to create a way to better personalize and pass down these stories,” Sawyer says, “so that no grandchild should ever wonder what their grandparent was like.”

He had help from an entrepreneurial club at Stetson University in Deland, where he was studying finance.

While many people like to write a book, or track down family genealogy on Ancestry.com, TSOLife offers people an opportunity to share their stories online and in a documentary. In a way young people can relate to them.

When was the last time you saw a 13 year read an actual book?” he asks. “When was the last time you saw them pick up an iPad? Literally two seconds ago.”

Trial memberships are free for 30 days, allowing people to post their stories. “We like to run the company with a conscience and a heart. We keep everything and do not delete,” he adds.

After that, if they want to continue adding stories, it’s $14.99 monthly or $275 for life. Documentaries start at $1500.

Each story has its own privacy setting, so the contributor can make it public or allow only his or her descendants access.

TSOLife, which serves North America, already has done a documentary on former U.S. Senator and Stetson University alumnus Max Cleland, which is in the Library of Congress.

The company is in the midst of its second round of $200,000 funding. It’s already raised $95,000 of that, which will be used for future development.

What’s next? They’ll be hiring two or three people for high-tech development within the next four months and following up with another $200,000 capital campaign.


Get on board: Tampa StartupBus rolls toward New Orleans July 31

Led by Conductors Kevin Mircovich and Brent Henderson, a busload of techies and innovators will leave Tampa July 31 to travel more than 650 miles to New Orleans on the StartupBus.

Described as an entrepreneurial boot camp and hackathon on wheels, the StartupBus brings together marketers, developers and designers to launch startups in 72 hours.

“StartupBus offers a platform to launch your idea. It’s an opportunity to build a team around your concept and take it from idea to reality,” Mircovich explains. “You’ll validate your idea, build an MVP [minimum viable product] and get traction all in a week.”

What riders usually have in common is an interest in entrepreneurship, plus a desire to sharpen their skills and develop a network. “We get people from all kinds of careers and backgrounds. We get everything from successful business owners, to aspiring entrepreneurs, students, and retirees,” he says. “Generally participants have some kind of experience or background in tech, but we’ve of course had non tech-savvy riders that excel.”

The StartupBus offers prospective entrepreneurs an opportunity to build a business team -- or work on someone else’s. “This is a chance for people with a business idea to recruit a team, and the people without an idea to find a team or idea they are interested in working on,” he says.

Riders face a number of challenges, such as working in the limited space onboard the bus with sporadic wifi service. “Some of the best work you’ll get done is in hotel lobbies along the way. Most teams take advantage of that and will work all night in the lobby,” he advises.

Participants pay a $299 registration fee, plus reduced rates on lodging. They also must pay for food and transportation home.

The journey ends for the approximately 30 riders August 4 at StartupBus Finals in New Orleans, where they have a chance to pitch their new business projects to investors and industry experts -- along with teams from six other regions in North America.

Although there aren’t any cash prizes, Mircovich says the rewards are greater than cash. “You’ll learn a ton about starting a company (through experience), you’ll find that you’ve become a no-excuses / get things done kind of person, and you’ll build great relationships with people you may work with in the future,” he explains.

Mircovich, now a software engineer, knows firsthand. In 2014, he rode the bus to Austin, TX, as a rookie. “I jumped on the bus, not knowing what to expect, and in the 72 hours my team and I came up with an idea, developed a solution, created a brand, closed some sales, and pitched what we built on stage in front of hundreds of other entrepreneurs. It really pushed me out of my comfort zone and into entrepreneurship,” he recalls.

The experience led him to learn software development.

More than 2,000 have participated in StartupBus since it began in San Francisco in 2010. Hundreds of companies have formed on the bus or through the alumni network.

The first Tampa bus rolled in 2012 after a number of residents participated in the 2011 trek from Miami. If you'd like to apply for the 2017 ride, visit North America Startup Bus and use the invite code 83degreesmedia.


Tampa tech firm, Hivelocity, expanding data services

Hivelocity opened for business as a shared web hosting company in 2002. Its founders, Steve Eschweiler, Mike Architetto and Ben Linton, were looking to run a tech business on a budget.

Their philosophy? To help customers succeed.

“We have a vested interest in all of our customers being wildly successful,” explains Eschweiler, COO.

It has paid off.

Today Hivelocity has an international customer base and is expanding its footprint with its third data center, its second in Tampa. The data centers house servers clients essentially rent to store their data to customers here and in faraway places like Africa, Brazil, the Middle East and Japan.

“We have customers from about 134 different countries," says Rick Nicholas, VP of Colocation and Managed Services. “These people just go on our website, click and buy the use of our server.”

Hivelocity held a grand opening at its data center June 22 at Hampton Oaks Business Park on U.S. Highway 301 near Interstate 4. “We rebuilt and retrofitted it for our purposes,” Nicholas explains. “It’s got great bones, fiber connectivity to it.”

It invested in the “eight figures,” he says, but would not provide a specific number. 

Hivelocity is occupying 30,000 of the 90,000 square feet in the center and plans to open up the rest as the company grows. The center, that doubles the company’s capacity, opened in March. Construction took a year to complete.

The company, which employs 60, offers a broad range of services including backup, management, performance and security services. Some nine employees were added for the new data center and more will be hired as the company grows.

One of its more recent endeavors is offering colocation services, or the ability to place clients’ servers in Hivelocity’s facilities. “We’re the only large and locally owned colocation option in the [Tampa] market,” Nicholas says. “Customers value knowing who's running the company they’re trusting with their critical data and equipment.”

Hivelocity knows firsthand how important colocation services can be. “We’re a very large consumer of colocation space ourselves,” he explains. “We needed to expand our footprint due to growth, regardless of whether or not we offered colocation to other customers, and it's a business we like very much.”

What lies ahead? More organic growth, Eschweiler says.

We are actively seeking acquisition opportunities,” he says. “We are currently looking at several that will either give us a new service or fill an area of service where we may have a gap.”

With offices already in Tampa, Miami, Atlanta and Los Angeles, it hopes to open offices in the Midwest and in Europe.

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