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So You Want To Be A Nurse? New Training Program Takes Only 16 Months

The employment outlook for registered nurses will grow by 19 percent from 2012 to 2022 nationwide, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The growth is fueled by many things, including an increase in the need for preventative care and the aging baby boomer population. The need is particularly strong in Florida, where the Florida Center for Nursing predicts a shortage of 56,000 nurses will occur by 2025.

New York’s Utica College plans to help address these needs with a new nursing program in St. Petersburg.

The idea came about as some of the college’s retired faculty living in the Tampa Bay area noticed the region’s growing healthcare industry.

"It seemed particularly important to us, given that we see different ways people can earn a nursing degree as a strategy for helping the residents of Florida," says Dale Scalise-Smith, VP of Utica College’s School of Online and Extended Studies and External Partnerships.  

An innovative aspect of the program is its accelerated format, allowing someone with a Bachelor’s Degree in a subject other than nursing to enter the profession in 16 months. This is made possible because of the hybrid classroom and online delivery system which includes both classroom and lab work as well as clinical experiences.

"We really wanted to find innovative ways to deliver high quality education programs in a collaborative environment," says Scalise-Smith.

The intention is not to compete with, but rather complement existing programs to help fill the vacancies. Through an agreement with BayCare Health Systems, Utica plans to utilize evening and weekend slots at local hospitals for the clinical experience component, allowing the daytime slots to be available for other programs.

The college is repurposing 8,000 square feet of space at 9400 4th St. North in St. Petersburg to include a lab, classroom, student lounge and faculty and administrative offices.

A number of new positions will be created as a result of the program, including full-time faculty, student success coaches and administrative positions such as the director of academic services who will oversee both teaching and academic domains.

The first class begins in August, with an expected enrollment of 16.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Dale Scalise-Smith, Utica College

All Children's Research To Focus On Community, Plans To Add 300+ Jobs

A new education and research center and grassroots community programming will address current and long term health needs of children in St. Petersburg and beyond.

All Children’s Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine recently purchased land adjacent to its current building in downtown St. Petersburg to expand its research and training facilities. The primary focus of the new center will be in neurosciences, cancer and cardiac research and disease. The facility will support an expanded residency and medical student program, as well as training for nurses and other allied health professionals.

"The facility will attract and support a number of PhD and Masters-level researchers, physicians and clinical scientists that will contribute to our vision to be able to cure and better treat disease, particularly for chronic populations," says Bill Horton, senior VP of strategic business services for All Children’s Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine.

The property was purchased from the University of South Florida (USF), which was a natural fit given the existing relationship the hospital has with the USF Children’s Research Institute, where scientists from both organizations collaborate.

The center will also strengthen the medical research corridor that is developing in St. Petersburg including USF, USF St. Petersburg, Bayfront Health Systems, Florida Blue’s Healthbox Accelerator Program and entrepreneurial incubator biotech firms developing in the Tampa Bay area.

"There’s a thriving academic research environment in this corridor," says Horton. "It’s a tremendous synergy that feeds and supports one another in the cross-development of this scientific work."

An estimated 300 to 400 new jobs will be created in as a result of the expansion. The development for the new property will be funded through philanthropy and grants. The facility is expected to open in 2018 or 2019.
   
The hospital is also working with the community at large to address critical issues in the short-term, such as infant mortality and childhood obesity. Grassroots education programs and interventions are being developed in collaboration with the City of St. Petersburg, in addition to changes in public policy to improve the overall health of the community.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Bill Horton, All Children's Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine

Sarasota Welcomes Heated Exchange Art Exhibit, French Connection

Art Center Sarasota hopes to engage locals and tourists alike with its 2014-15 exhibition series.

The series kicks off October 23 with a traveling exhibit titled Heated Exchange, which features encaustic art, or arts made of molten wax using heated tools. This little known art process can be used for painting, sculptures and other mediums.

The biggest exhibition of the season will be unveiled in May. Titled "Confluence France," the display is part of an 8-year series showcasing artwork and artists from regions and countries where Sarasota has a sister city. Sister Cities International pairs cities with those in other countries with whom they share interests, whether it be due to historical connections, a trade relationship, strong expatriate communities or personal experiences. Sarasota has nine sister cities in all, with this exhibit focusing on Perpignon France. The confluence series began in 2013 with a focus on Tel Mond, Israel.

"We’re finding ways to mutually benefit and grow each other’s municipalities," says Emma Thurgood, exhibitions curator for Arts Center Sarasota.

The series is the first international exhibition for the Center.

The Center is also running a community project allowing people to create pieces of paper installation that will be featured in galleries as part of a Collective Paper Aesthetics exhibit in May and June 2015.

The over 20 exhibitions taking place in the next year were funded in part by a Tourist Development Center (TDC) grant awarded by the Sarasota County Commission, designated for tourist development.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Emma Thurgood, Art Center Sarasota

KeriCure Invisible Bandage Expands Product Line, Seeks Capital Funding

A Wesley Chapel based business is expanding its product line and seeking additional funding to increase its sales force and market presence.

KeriCure is a proprietary invisible bandage product that provides a natural, safe, effective way to heal topical wounds. The product uses a unique nanoparticle emulsion technology to mimic the skin’s natural healing properties.

CEO and Founder Kerriann Greenhalgh, PhD an organic chemist and University of South Florida graduate, created the product after being personally affected by inadequate over the counter wound care. Her husband contracted a serious MRSA infection from a small cut on his hand and almost lost the use of his entire hand. Her chemistry background led her to create an innovative solution that is now available for public use.

The company launched in August 2012 and has products for both veterinary and human use available in retail stores such as Amazon, Vitamin Discount Centers, Publix and Earth Origins as well as online.

They recently launched a Series A Fundraise, seeking funding to grow their market presence and expand their product line, with particular focus on the healthcare space. FDA clearance is currently being sought for the advanced liquid bandage, which will be used by physicians to protect surgical incisions.  

"We’re looking to capitalize on the success we had the first two years," says Greenhalgh.

They are also looking to add additives to the natural product line such as vitamin E and tea tree oil.

Kericure was a recent participant in the Greater Tampa Chamber of Commerce’s Startup Scholars program, which is cited as a big contributor to success. As a result of that program, Greenhalgh helped start a local networking group called the Consumer Products Club, which supports local businesses with shared resources, services, opportunities and ideas for marketing and distribution channels.  

"We’re all working together and seeing growth across the board for everybody,” says Greenhalgh. “Each person is bringing unique experiences and successes to the table."

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Kerriann Greenhalgh, KeriCure

Health Insurance Innovations Announces Acquisition, Expansion

With the introduction of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the demand for information about health insurance products has increased dramatically. Consumers often turn to websites to help them navigate the insurance space and learn about available options.

A recent acquisition by Tampa-based Health Insurance Innovations (HII) aims to capitalize on this need and provide more reliable, easily understood information for consumers.  

HII is a cloud-based technology platform that links health insurance agents with consumers to provide quotes and sell customized, flexible insurance plans. Silicon Valley-based HealthPocket is a data aggregation technology that provides a repository of health insurance information for consumers to view and purchase, including both private and government-funded options. The website allows consumers to rank available plans by price, doctor or other factors such as prescription drug needs.

The merging of the two companies will provide even more customized services for consumers to help navigate often confusing information about health insurance options.

HII plans to use the acquisition to fuel the company’s growth and competitive advantage, including sales and continuing the track record of success. The company is taking over additional office space in their Tampa location and will eventually expand their local employee base.

"Consumers will be engaged with the tools and data to help them make better and more informed decisions which lead to lower annual healthcare costs," says Kevin Coleman, head of research and data for HealthPocket. "We really hope to empower the consumer to make the best decisions."

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Sources: Kevin Coleman, HealthPocket; Mike Kosloske, HII

On Tampa Bay's Radar: A New Exercise App To Help You Get Fit

Do you spend a lot of time traveling for work or constricted in a home office? The new iOS app Fittr could be your fitness solution.

Initially developed as a workout service for people at home with limited equipment, Fittr now features unique workouts suitable for home, the gym, a park or a hotel room.

Fitness is a fast-growing niche market for purveyors of mobile applications. From exercise apps designed for your smartphone or tablet to app-based nutritional databases, there is no shortage of opportunity to exercise with the help of a hand-held device.

The Tampa Bay-based startup team behind Fittr plans to distinguish itself from the competition in a few ways.

"The noticeable difference between our workouts and our competition is that ours is a 1-2-3 punch: It's adaptive on the run, it learns from the user over time, AND learns from the data of the entire group,'' says Fittr's Chief Marketing Technologist Kiki Schirr. "Here's an example: Don't want to do squats today? Swap it. Swap squats a few times and we'll stop suggesting it,'' Schirr explains.

Once the app learns the habits and likes or dislikes of your age group or weight range, it will aim to offer tailored suggestions that take the data into account.

In addition to adaptive fitness routines, the Fittr app utilizes a motivational point system that rewards users who increase workout difficulty or length over time. Exercises that earn a certain number of points on day one earn less on day four unless you up the intensity or number of reps. To boost your overall Fittr score (and to get a more well-rounded workout), you'll have to change things up. Points are calculated based on a variety of factors, including your personal fitness level as well as data from the overall set.

Once opened, the application prompts you to answer a few questions about your fitness level and workout habits. Choose between goals like Lose Weight, Get Cut and Get Stronger. Track metrics that matter to you, whether it's weight lost or inches gained. Plug in preferences and custom information like the type of equipment you have available on a given day.
Fittr CEO Tyler Perkins, an athlete and ACE-certified personal trainer, designed the foundation of every Fittr workout.

New users can download the app and enjoy a free one-week trial of built-in exercises. After that, it's $11.99 per month to join the workout service. Multi-month packages will be available soon, Schirr says.

Along with Schirr and Perkins, Fittr's team includes Chief Design Officer and Project Manager Nolan Perkins and CTO Seo Townsend.

The first version of Fittr was released during a launch party on July 16 at Tampa Bay WaVE. A Fundable campaign for Fittr also opened that day.

Post-launch plans include adding nutrition content and building an Android-compatible application.

"After nutrition, we'll be adding social aspects. After social aspects, it's device integration. Then social round two, then adding niche exercises, then more devices, and then... we have so many wonderful things planned for this app!'' Schirr says.

The startup team was recently accepted to Tampa Bay WaVe's FirstWAVE accelorator program.

"Fittr is incredibly grateful for all the opportunities that the Tampa Bay area has provided. From the [Hillsborough County] EDI2 initiative, Tampa Bay Innovates, Ignite Tampa Bay, StartupGrind (http://www.83degreesmedia.com/features/grind042214.aspx), TBTF, or Collaborative Technologies of Tampa Bay, everyone has welcomed us with open arms,'' says Schirr. "However, we owe an even deeper debt of gratitude to Tampa Bay WaVE, which has provided us access to amazing mentors and other startups who've been there before.''

"Tampa is full of great opportunities for startups,'' Perkins agrees. "We're grateful for all the support of the Tampa Bay community.''
 
Writer: Justine Benstead
Source: Kiki Schirr, Chief Marketing Technologist, Fittr

Omega Communities, Sarasota Churches To Develop Senior Living Communities, Create 300 Jobs

Omega Communities, a Birmingham, Ala.-based organization that develops senior living communities on land leased in partnership with faith-based organizations, is bringing its unique business model to Florida's Gulf coast.

Omega is partnering with the Church of Hope in Sarasota and the South Biscayne Church in North Port to develop two assisted living and memory care campuses in Sarasota County.

Omega works with qualified investors in the financing, development and operation of senior care facilities, which are built on land leased by local faith-based organizations. In return, the churches receive a percentage -- between 10 and 25 percent -- of the profit generated by the senior living communities.

"These senior living communities are designed from the inside out. What that means is they are built with a core mission -- a partnership with a large, community impacting church -- and that foundation becomes the center of not only the design of the facility, but more importantly, the core programmatic level of care that will be provided in that community,'' says Omega Communities COO James Taylor, Jr.

Taylor says that the project cost on each Sarasota County facility is just over $30 million, and that once both facilities are completed, the economic impact on Sarasota County is estimated to be in excess of $30 million per year.

The Springs at South Biscayne Church broke ground in January 2014, and the project is expected to reach completion in early spring 2015. The 11,000-square-foot facility will feature 38 memory care units and 95 assisted living units.

The Fountains of Hope broke ground in Sarasota earlier this month (July), with an estimated completion date in fall 2015. Between 150 to 200 jobs will be created during the construction phase, and upon completion, the 9,000-square-foot facility will require 100 fulltime employees.

"We have built a model that utilizes the very best of both the nonprofit and for-profit models for senior care communities. At the core, we've developed a partnership with the church that will provide ministry, volunteers and marketing … to provide a vital resource for the local community,'' says Taylor.

Writer: Jessi Smith
Source: James Taylor, Jr., Omega Communities

Quest Diagnostics Opens National Center In Tampa, Creates 350 Jobs

Quest Diagnostics will provide about 350 jobs at the new diagnostics center that is now open in Tampa near Busch Gardens.

Job positions are in customer service, logistics and human resources. Company officials anticipate hiring will continue through 2015. Some of those jobs will be subsidized with state and local funds.

The 48,000-square-foot facility, at 10441 University Center Drive, will provide customer service and logistics operations for  Quest's nationwide operations. As one of two Quest Diagnostics National Operations Centers, it also will share human resource services for the company's 45,000 employees. The second national center is in Lenexa KS.

"This new center will elevate Quest's customer services to the next level of responsiveness and quality," says James E. Davis, Quest's senior vice president of operations. "It reflects our comittment to delivering a superior customer experience and providing diagnostics insights that will help people lead healthier lives."

The architectural design is by San Francisco-based Gensler which has a Tampa office. Construction is by Rhode Island-based Gilbane which has several locations in the Tampa Bay area.

The Tampa facility will provide state-of-the-art technology to monitor air and ground transportation of patient specimens from about 2,200 patient service centers nationwide. Quest's services include advanced genetic cancer tests as well as routine cholesterol and diabetes screenings.

In Florida, Quest has full-service clinical laboratories in Tampa, Miramar and Orlando.  There also are dermatological pathology laboratories and offices and patient service centers statewide.

The center is expected to create about $9.3 million in capital investment.

Quest is eligible to receive about $675,000 in incentives from the state's Qualified Target Industry Program. About $540,000 is from the state with the remainder from the city of Tampa and Hillsborough County. The funds will subsidize up to 175 jobs that will pay a minimum average annual salary of slightly more than $47,500.

"Florida's life science industry is one of the best in the nation and as companies like Quest Diagnostics expand their presence in Florida, the sector will continue to grow and more businesses will look at the state as a vital location," says Gary Swoope, president of Enterprise Florida, the state's chief economic development organization.

Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Gary Swoope, Enterprise Florida

Bike-Share Program Gets Ready To Roll In Tampa

Bicycle wheels are almost ready to roll on Tampa streets. Some assembly is required.
 
Beginning in late August, 300 rent-able bicycles scattered across more than 30 locations in downtown, Channelside, Ybor City, Hyde Park and Davis Islands will kick-start Coast Bike Share, the city's long-anticipated "bike share" program.
 
Mayor Bob Buckhorn hopped aboard one of the blue bicycles for a short spin down the sidewalk by City Hall.
 
"I think it is one more amenity that will allow the city to take its place as a great American city," he says. "I couldn't be more excited. We want them to succeed. I want to see blue bikes all over downtown. We're going to paint the town blue with these bikes."
 
Before residents get their pedal time, Coast Bike Share  will assemble more blue bicycles at a warehouse on Franklin Street. But ahead of the August launch, memberships are available for purchase.
 
They include a special $99 annual membership that comes with 90 minutes of ride time per day instead of the standard 60 minute ride, and a free helmet.
 
Daily ride costs will be $5, monthly memberships, $30, and annual memberships, $79. Reservations will be available on the spot via a keypad on the bicycle, online or by phone.
 
The bicycles weigh in at a relatively light 39 pounds, well below the industry standard of 51 pounds. Cruising speed is 11 miles per hour. They have baskets in the front and operate with a shaft drive rather than greasy chains. "They are very easy to ride," says Eric Trull, Coast's program manager.
 
The bike share system, and its tech savvy bicycles, are from New York City-based Social Bicycles which also has programs in Phoenix, Orlando and San Francisco. Tampa's program is managed by Miami-based Cyclehop which has 20 years experience in the cycling industry.
 
Residents can keep their eyes peeled for "coming soon" signs that will be placed at rental hubs including Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park and City Hall. As the program expands, Coast officials anticipate adding kiosks in the SoHo district, Tampa Heights, Seminole Heights and Westshore. The University of South Florida plans to launch its own bike-share program, Trull says.
 
Advertising opportunities also are available for small businesses and other organizations that want to sponsor a bicycle kiosk. For information send an email to this address.
 
Writer: Kathy Steele
Source: Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn

Startup Aims To Increase Connections, Community With Micro Experiences

In today’s digital world, we often lose the ability or desire to connect on a personal level or try new experiences. A new start-up hopes to change this by giving millennials (defined as ages 21 – 33) and others a chance to network and engage in a whole new way.

Tampa-based Outeraction encourages people to step outside of their comfort zone by participating in micro experiences such as rock climbing, kayaking, paddle boarding, cooking classes and brewery tours. In order to facilitate interaction, the experiences are limited to 30 people, cost $30 each and last no longer than three hours.

"Social media drowns everything out. I wanted to change the way people interact." says founder Matt Rutkovitz, University of Tampa graduate.

Rutkovitz formed the company out of a need to help people and make their lives better. He wanted to create a consistent and trustworthy environment that would make people comfortable with trying something different.  

The intention of the events is not business networking or dating. The goal is to create experiences that will get people connected with their community and their peers.

Outeraction also works with local companies to provide an outsourced employee benefit called a "Fun for Businesses" package. These events are not limited by age or quantity and are aimed at increasing employee team building, communication skills and productivity.

Some events also have a philanthropic component, such as an upcoming Habitat for Humanity event.

"Community is the capstone of growth," says Rutkovitz "We have to connect with each other as much as possible."

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Matt Rutkovitz, Outeraction

Tampa General Hospital Designs Prediabetes Education Program

A new community outreach program at Tampa General Hospital is designed to prevent diabetes and other health conditions by identifying those at risk before the diseases take effect.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated over 79 million Americans age 20 and older have a condition known as prediabetes. Most do not realize they have the condition because their symptoms are not as severe as those with diabetes. It is a serious health condition that increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

Risk factors can include: being a woman who has had a baby over nine pounds in weight at birth, having a parent, sister
or brother with diabetes, being under 65 years of age and getting little to no exercise and being 45 years of age or older.

Recognizing the need in the community, Tampa General Hospital (TGH) is offering free educational sessions to help those at risk to achieve optimal health through lifestyle choices such as diet and exercise. The program involves 16 weekly sessions followed by eight monthly support group meetings.

"We’d like to teach people the skills to prevent developing diabetes," says Tamika Powe, Community Health Educator for TGH, adding that the benefits can trickle down to family members as well. "Hopefully they’re taking the information they learn in this program back home to their families to help everyone make better choices."

The program is funded by TGH and is limited to 12 registrants per class in order to maximize effectiveness. The next session begins in September at locations in Tampa Palms and South Tampa. Participants must meet qualifying criteria.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Tamika Powe, Tampa General Hospital

St. Petersburg Greenhouse Launches Craft Entrepreneurship Program

Etsy, the most popular online marketplace for handmade items, is collaborating with cities across the U.S. to make it easier for crafters to supplement their income through workshops and expert advice. Because of its thriving arts culture, St. Petersburg was recently selected as one of 10 cities to pilot the program this year.

The program started last March in Rockford IL and has since expanded to places like Newark NJ and Santa Cruz County, Dallas TX.  The idea is to create an open source curriculum that can be used by other areas to run their own classes.

Unlike most economic development programs that provide tools to start businesses, Etsy’s goal is to provide supplemental income for people out of work during seasonal periods or perhaps to help a household boost itself over the poverty line.

Local classes will be hosted by the St. Petersburg Greenhouse, a collaborative effort between the St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce and City of St. Petersburg. Classes are free and available to crafters who have not sold on Etsy in the past.

Classes are taught by local craft sellers who have been successful using Etsy as an outlet. Topics include time management, branding, pricing, shipping and photography. Participants will be able to sell their first 20 items for free on Etsy. The first session begins August 4.

"Here in St. Petersburg, such a large part of our economy and what makes us go is in the arts," says Sean Kennedy, Greenhouse Manager and Economic Development Coordinator for the St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce. "We think it’s important to help artists be in the best position to succeed financially as well as develop their craft."

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Sean Kennedy, St. Petersburg Greenhouse

Embracing Our Differences Receives Donation For Art, Inclusion Programs

A recent donation will allow even more K-12 students in Sarasota and Manatee Counties to appreciate diversity through art.

Sarasota-based home builder Neal Communities recently donated $10,000 to support the efforts of Embracing Our Differences. A project of Coexistence Inc., Embracing our Differences’ mission is to create awareness and promote the value of diversity and inclusion, particularly among youth. The nonprofit achieves this through community-based outdoor art exhibits as well as teacher training.

The organization's pinnacle event is its annual juried art exhibit, which displays billboard-sized images in downtown Sarasota and Bradenton. The images depict diversity and acceptance through the use of art and writing.

"It's about teaching the next generation how to get along,'' says Michael Shelton, Executive Director for Embracing our Differences. The organization focuses on relevant topics such as bullying, making a statement in a visual and effective way.

Through working with the Sarasota and Manatee County school districts as well as other educational organizations, Embracing our Differences was able to reach over 30,000 children during the 2013-14 school year.

The funding will be used to support educational programming such as the "Make-a-Day-of-It!" program, which provides free bus transportation for students and teachers to view the outdoor exhibit and other cultural venues, including Florida Studio Theatre, Mote Marine Aquarium and Ringling Museum. More than 13,000 students participated in the program last year, and the additional funding will make it possible for close to 25,000 to participate this year.

"Teaching children at a very young age will have not only a societal benefit, but a huge economic benefit as well from those who buy into it and accept it," says Shelton.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Michael Shelton, Embracing our Differences

Florida Universities Rank Among Best For Patents, Innovation

Innovation continues to grow among Florida’s top research universities, as indicated by a recent global ranking of universities by the number of patents granted in 2013.

The University of South Florida (USF), University of Florida (UF) and University of Central Florida (UCF) were granted 239 patents all together. This puts the group ahead of other prestigious groups such as the research Triangle in North Carolina (Duke University, North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill) and the Texas universities (the entire University of Texas system, Rice University and Texas A&M University), all of which have a longstanding tradition of high quality research and technology innovation.

Together, the Florida universities head the Florida High Tech Corridor Council,  an economic development initiative whose mission is to grow the state's high tech industry through research, marketing, workforce development and entrepreneurship. The Corridor’s partnership involves over 25 organizations, 14 state and community colleges and 12 workforce boards.

"It’s great to be recognized by the National Academy, which is well more than 100 universities." says Randy Berridge, Florida High Tech Corridor Council President. "The report reflects the strength in our 23-county corridor region."

The report was produced by the Tampa-based National Academy of Inventors and the Intellectual Property Owners Association and recognizes the role that patents play in university research, innovation, technology and eventually workforce enhancement. The goal is eventually to commercialize the patents, thus creating companies and jobs surrounding the success of the products or services.

Berridge attributes the success to the leadership within each university and the emphasis placed on the importance of high quality research. "It represents not only the university but the professors who are doing the heavy lifting in generating the technologies through their input and that of their top students," says Berridge.

USF was ranked 12 overall, with 95 patents granted – up from 83 in 2012.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Randy Berridge, Florida High Tech Corridor

USAA Expands To Brandon, Adds New Jobs In Hillsborough County

USAA broke ground recently on a new facility near the Lee Roy Selmon Expressway in Brandon. The facility will be a mirror image of its current operating center in New Tampa, with similar jobs and functions.

The growth is being driven by the company’s members -- military veterans and their families.

The company has been in Tampa for over 40 years, with its first operations beginning in the Westshore area. It has expanded since then to more than 2,500 employees in locations across Tampa.

"USAA as a whole is seeing growth everywhere," says Robert Hoyland, VP and general manager for USAA’s Tampa operations "We started as an insurance company and have expanded in the last 30 to 40 years to run the gamut of financial services."

In addition to insurance products, the company provides banking products, mutual funds, investments and financial planning.

As a result of the expansion, the company is hiring Member Contact Representatives, who will take incoming calls and reach out to members about products.

The new facility is scheduled to open in October, but hiring has already begun.

"Part of the expansion is to tap into the workforce here in Tampa," says Hoyland.  "We came here because we know there’s a great market for hiring financial services folks."

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Robert Hoyland, USAA
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