| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter Youtube RSS Feed

Innovation + Job News

927 Articles | Page: | Show All

Young Chinese Artists Make U.S. Debut At 2 Tampa Bay Area Art Museums

An unprecedented look inside modern Chinese art of will be on display this summer in Tampa and St. Petersburg through a pioneering exhibit featuring 27 emerging artists from China.

"My Generation: Young Chinese Artists'' features work shown for the first time outside of China. The exhibit opens to the public at both the Tampa Museum of Art and the Museum of Fine Arts in St. Pete on Saturday, June 7th. The exhibit also features a series of related lectures and performances, such as an exploration of the history of "Red Rock'' -- the Chinese rock scene and corresponding concert, another first to the Tampa Bay region.

Hand-picked and curated by Author Barbara Pollack, one of America's foremost authorities on Chinese art, the young artists have almost all grown up under their nation's one-child policy and tend toward subtlety where politics are concerned. Yet they express issues of alienation, self-definition, cynicism and rebellion though their work in variety of media. The environment, reaction to massive urban areas, the paradoxical market economy, the personal side of growing up as only children and the pressure for marriage and family despite sexual orientation are backdrop themes to much of the work.

The exhibit will ''introduce us to parts of Chinese culture that we know nothing about and I think people will be really surprised,'' says David Connelly, an MFA spokesperson.

"This exhibition represents a milestone in the life of this institution, and our partnership with the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg is an important step forward for the nature of regional partnerships,'' says Todd Smith, Executive Director of the Tampa Museum of Art, who originated the project and recently resigned to pursue another museum opportunity in California.

The collaboration between the two museums is an innovative approach that allows more art to be shown. For example, one of the more acclaimed artists in the show, Sun Xun, is creating a large installation specifically for the MFA, utilizing animation and drawings, which will take up an entire gallery.
 
At the same time, the concurrent approach cross-pollinates the region's art lovers. The museums are offering a $20 discounted combination ticket so that visitors can enjoy the full experience.

"We are hoping that with the outstanding innovative work in the show,'' museum patrons and art lovers will cross Tampa Bay to see both exhibits, says Connelly.
 
"My Generation: Young Chinese Artists,'' will be on view June 7 through Sept. 21, 2014. The exhibit will then travel to the Oklahoma City Museum of Art for display later this year.

Writer: Kendra Langlie
Sources: David Connelly, Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg
 

Google For Entrepreneurs Powers Startup Weekend Tampa Bay 2014

What makes Tampa's upcoming Startup Weekend distinctive? 

For one, Google for Entrepreneurs is backing the event. And new in 2014, the weekend will expand to include Youth and Maker events along with the core startup-driven competition.

Three years ago, Startup Weekend formed in Tampa as part of an international movement in more than 200 cities around the world. At the weekend-long, volunteer-led event, anyone is welcome to pitch an idea for a startup business. For the next 54 hours, teams form, vote for the top ideas, and dive in to all aspects of developing a fresh new product -- from coding to marketing to creating a working prototype. There are winners, and sometimes real-world businesses form as a result.

The winner of the third Startup Weekend Tampa Bay developed his proposal from a pain point he'd encountered upon arrival to the event. Seeking a more interactive, real-time way to engage with other attendees, Todd Goldberg pitched the product that would go on to win Tampa's 2012 Startup Weekend -- EXMO, now Eventjoy. The business, which provides fee free ticketing and organization for events, is now a Y-combinator backed Tampa Bay success story.

Wazinit, an app to help consumers identify food ingredients and allergens, has achieved notoriety of its own since winning Startup Weekend Tampa Bay 2013. The beta-stage mobile application gained a place in Tampa Bay WaVE's First WaVE accelerator program, garnered almost $1,000 at crowd-sourcing festival OneSpark in Feb. 2014, and took a second place finish as a Top Tech creator at the event.

A similar standout startup could evolve from this July's Startup Weekend Tampa Bay. Don't consider yourself an expert, or even an experienced, techie? Co-organizer Michael LaPlante says that diversity amongst attendees will be a focus in 2014. Traditionally, the event caters to a tech-savvy crowd who already know about coding or creating a product.
 
"This year, we are really trying to target a different demographic and go outside of just technology,'' LaPlante explains. "We want all entrepreneurs to feel welcome to come pitch their ideas and have a life-changing experience.''

"You will be able to contribute, no matter what, if you participate,'' he says.

A weeklong event "focused around bringing the community and all the events together into a culmination of 'awesomeness' '' is also on the radar, LaPlante teases. This Startup Week concept is set to roll out in six core cities, including Tampa, according to Startup Weekend founder Andrew Hyde.
 
Startup Weekend Tampa Bay 2014 will take place July 25-27 at the Hillsborough Community College Dale Mabry Campus. To register or volunteer, visit the Startup Weekend Tampa Bay 2014 website.

Writer: Justine Benstead
Source: Michael LaPlante, Startup Weekend Tampa Bay

Ping Pong, Anyone? Urban Conga Wants You To Play In Downtown Tampa

Residents and visitors in downtown Tampa will soon have another reason to get social.

Ping pong tables will be installed in parks in downtown, starting with Lykes Gaslight.

The project is the latest from Urban Conga, a group of Tampa Bay creatives who use play to encourage the community to utilize urban spaces with interactive installations such as the Wall of Creativity at the recent Sunset Music Festival.

"We wanted to figure out a way to bring this idea of play in a more permanent way to the city of Tampa," says Ryan Swanson, Urban Conga co-founder.

The idea came about when Swanson backpacked around Europe and noticed ping pong tables everywhere in large cities like Berlin, Paris and Barcelona, as well as in U.S. cities like New York and Boston. He wondered why there are none in our local cities. After discovering how expensive and bulky typical public ping pong tables are, Swanson decided to design a table himself for a fraction of the price.

As an added benefit, local businesses will hold on to paddles and balls, driving people into their space. For a small deposit, people will rent the equipment and then receive their money back upon return.

"Bringing these tables to downtown will be a small but large impact on creating more street level activity in downtown Tampa," says Swanson.

Urban Conga recently received $1,000 from Awesome Tampa Bay to build the first tables.

"We really like this project because it’s big, fun and really creative," says Rafaela Amador, Dean of Awesomeness for Awesome Tampa Bay. "We like what Urgan Conga is trying to do. We want to support that kind of creative infrastructure in people in Tampa."

Plans are to install tables in downtown St. Petersburg after the Tampa tables are complete.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Rafaela Amador, Awesome Tampa Bay; Ryan Swanson, Urban Conga

Pinellas County Public Schools Teach STEM Skills Through Interactive Play

Elementary and middle school students in Pinellas County Public Schools participate in hands-on learning and experimentation with robots that teach not only STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) but business and communication skills as well.

Thanks to a $10,000 grant from Suncoast Credit Union Foundation, 48 fourth- and fifth-grade students at Leila Davis Elementary School in Clearwater participate in a STEM Academy after school. The students design and build robots that allow them to explore scientific concepts with a hands-on approach. They also learn entrepreneurship, presentation skills and public speaking.

The initiative is part of a wider effort that began in October of last year by Pinellas County Superintendent Michael Grego. The program is funded by grants as well as county taxes. In all, 63 STEM academies have been created in elementary and middle schools within the past year, engaging students in fourth through eighth grade. The goal is to have all elementary and middle schools participating within the next year.

Students at Leila Davis Elementary are currently creating soccer players that move using robotics. They’re also designing
an alligator that will allow them to learn about the motion of its jaw and formation of its teeth. They’ve even designed a drummer and learned about the way it moves its hands and connects to music. Once the LEGOs are designed, students can make modifications using a computer program that interfaces with the robotics.

The program is 30 weeks long and has received positive feedback from parents and teachers.

Students also participated in a STEM expo at University of South Florida St. Petersburg. Each of the 63 schools had project boards that displayed their STEM components and how they relate to real-world concepts. Students shared their successes, challenges and how they overcame them.

The county’s overall goal is to encourage students to select accelerated math and science courses in high school and then ultimately a career path in a STEM field. The school district is currently working with business partners to make sure students graduate with the skills in demand for jobs.

"We’re trying to help fill a gap and provide our students with multiple opportunities to apply for different jobs and be competitive," says Laura Spence, STEM Coordinator for Pinellas County Schools.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Laura Spence, Pinellas County Schools

Bright House, City Of Tampa Partner To Provide Free WiFi In Downtown Parks

People who live, work and play in downtown Tampa parks will now have a way to access the Internet for free on their laptop, tablet or smartphone thanks to a partnership between the City of Tampa and Bright House Networks.

The project is the latest in a series of technology-focused initiatives started by Mayor Bob Buckhorn, which includes hack-a-thons and mobile payments for parking meters. The effort will make it easier for people to use the parks on a more regular basis, as well as allow people who work downtown to work in the parks.

"It’s one more factor that makes downtown even more attractive and more exciting for the intellectual capital that we’re trying to attract," says Buckhorn. "If people want to live, work and play in the urban core, then you’ve got to have urban amenities to facilitate that."

The WiFi will also be available the entire length of the Tampa Riverwalk, which spans from the Florida Aquarium to the Heights and Water Works Park north of the Straz Center for the Performing Arts. It is free for the first two hours, up to 1 GB per month. Bright House customers will be able to use complimentary WiFi in other parts of downtown as well.

The WiFi is funded by Bright House Networks and part of a larger agreement that allows Bright House access to city infrastructure to place hot spots elsewhere in the city. It’s scheduled to be complete by the end of 2014.

Free WiFi is offered in other cities including New York, Paris and Hong Kong.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn

Dali Museum, MOSI Tampa Celebrate Merging Of Art, Science

A new partnership between two Tampa Bay area museums will provide visitors with an interactive experience that engages the mind and senses.

The Dali Museum in St. Petersburg and Museum of Science and Industry (MOSI) in Tampa are partnering this summer as a way to encourage patrons to cross the bridges separating the Bay to experience what both museums have to offer. Dali had a fascination with illusion and was interested in math and science as well, making the partnership a natural one.

The Dali Museum will showcase a lot of the permanent collection that involves different types of perception and dimension, while MOSI’s focus will be on 3D.

The highpoint of the Dali Museum’s exhibit, Marvels of Illusion, is an interactive piece allowing visitors to download a mobile app that will allow them to become a part of a painting. The painting used for the exhibit is Dali’s 1976 painting: "Gala Contemplating the Mediterranean Sea Which at Twenty Meters Becomes the Portrait of Abraham Lincoln (Homage to Rothko)." Close up, you see a female figure intended to be Dali’s wife, Gala. As you step back, it becomes a portrait of Abraham Lincoln.

"It’s the kind of thing that really fascinates kids, and people of all ages," says Kathy Greif, Marketing Director for the Dali Museum.

The partnership will feature art displays at MOSI and science displays at the Dali Museum. The museums will also have reciprocal lectures, and visitors to one museum will receive half off admission to the other.

"In both cases, it’s a great place to visit no matter if you’re 2 or 100," says Greif.

Marvels of Illusion runs June 14 – October 12 at the Dali Museum.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Kathy Greif, The Dali Museum

Lakeland Art Installation Honors Veterans, Public Servants

A new public art installation in Lakeland pays tribute to veterans, police, firefighters and emergency responders.

The piece is a collaboration among Platform Art, Polk County Veterans Council and Lakeland youth.

Platform Art worked with Polk County Public Schools to provide workshops for high school teachers to help them incorporate 3D curriculum into their classrooms. They then held a design challenge, asking students to create a sculpture that represents public agencies using a one foot square footprint. Over 60 students responded to the challenge.

The winner was Lake Region High School senior Maria Vazquez, whose sculpture was then fabricated on a larger scale in glass and steel by regional artist Tom Monaco. The final piece consists of two vertical slabs of steel with images of first a couple looking at each other and then a baby behind them. A glass plate in front is engraved with the poem "Honor" by William McGehee, which wraps around a silhouette image of a soldier.

"You’re not only looking at a public servant, but at the reasons they do their job – their family, children," says Cynthia Haffey, executive director for Platform Art and graduate of the University of South Florida.

Vasquez first got the inspiration for the sculpture when she came across McGehee’s poem. After further research, Platform Art realized the poem was written while McGehee was in high school, and that he is currently on his second deployment in Afghanistan. He recorded himself reading the poem, which is incorporated into the display.

Once Vasquez’s design was selected, she met with Monaco and talked about how the public could interact with the piece and how people could approach it physically and visually.

"It was a great learning process for her," says Haffey. "She was stunned at the amount of thoughtful consideration you have to put into a work of art when doing something for the general public."

Vasquez is the daughter of immigrants living in Polk County. After graduating, she will attend Polk State College and then plans to further her education at a design school.

Platform Art is a nonprofit organization in Polk County that focuses on visual arts, leaning toward public art. The project is the first in a series of three with a similar theme and purpose. It will be displayed in City Hall for the summer, and will then be installed in Veterans Park. Eventually, the hope is for this and other sculptures in the series to tour the Tampa Bay region and potentially the State.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Cynthia Haffey, Platform Art

Hillsborough County Pledges $1M To New Manufacturing Academy, Apprenticeship Program

The need for talented manufacturing workers has led Hillsborough County to pledge $1 million toward resolving the local "skills gap.''

A new Manufacturing Academy and Apprenticeship/Internship Program (MAAIP) is a meant to be a "three-pronged approach'' to closing this gap and promoting manufacturing as a viable career path for young workers. The MAAIP also plans to place special emphasis on marketing to students, veterans, women, minorities and underserved communities.

The $1 million in seed money will be split between the Manufacturing Academy; an Apprenticeship and Internship Incentive Program; and marketing of the two to potential private sector partners, students and their families. $350,000 is allocated to CareerSource Tampa Bay for execution of the program's initiatives.

"This is a robust, proactive step by our Board of County Commissioners,'' says Lindsey Kimball, Hillsborough County Economic Development Director.

The Manufacturing Academy will highlight manufacturing as a viable career path for middle and high school students and military veterans. Students who complete the Manufacturing Academy will be credentialed through the Manufacturing Skills Standard Council's Certified Production Technician (CPT) certification.

The two-year program fills a void, providing a "continuum" of seamless training between educational institutions and employers. MAAIP will package together existing resources through Hillsborough County Public Schools and Hillsborough Community College into new training opportunities for students of many ages. This pool will then serve as a resource for companies who wish to participate in the program to recruit new talent.

Because apprenticeship and internship programs can be costly, many companies do not have these programs in place. $400,000 has been allocated for Manufacturing and Internship Incentives. This aspect of the program aims to bring together students participating in the Manufacturing Academy with the local businesses that can provide on-the-job-training and real-world experience.

CareerSource Tampa Bay is tasked with the job of finding and enrolling manufacturers to participate in the program.

Participating companies must be for-profit manufacturing businesses located in Hillsborough County. They will be required to pay the apprentice or intern a minimum wage equivalent to the average entry-level wage for the industry. A maximum benefit of $8,000 per year per internship or apprenticeship may be paid. Once performance requirements are met, the program will reimburse the company for wages paid to the Manufacturing Academy apprentice or intern.
 
CareerSource Tampa Bay will aim to raise awareness and engagement of MAAIP to potential students and their families through promotional efforts and marketing outreach, including developing and launching a website to promote the manufacturing industry in Hillsborough County. The website will offer career-building resources like fact sheets, success stories, quick links, videos of local manufacturers, lesson plans and workbooks, internship and apprenticeship opportunities, and more.
 
The program will be administered by the Hillsborough County Economic Development Department for the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC).

The MAAIP is a "team effort,'' Kimball says. It allows the BOCC "to support the manufacturing industry in Hillsborough County by leveraging our existing partner assets to fill the talent pipeline and engage manufacturers in the development of meaningful experiences for students.''

Writer: Justine Benstead
Source: Lindsey Kimball, Hillsborough County government

Stonehenge Growth Equity Partners Invests In Mobile Medical Help System

Stonehenge Growth Equity Partners (SGEP) recently invested in MobileHelp, a leading provider of M-PERS, or Mobile-Personal Emergency Response System, technology based in Boca Raton.

A Tampa-based investment firm, SGEP focuses on growth stage companies that use technology to solve a business problem, concentrating on the Southeastern United States. The company typically invests $1M to $5M per company, allowing them to assist growing companies that might not meet the minimum funding requirements of larger investors.

SGEP Managing Partner Steven Lux moved to Tampa in 1999 to open an investment office of Bank One, which later became Stonehenge Capital Company and then SCEP. Lux and his team were looking for Florida-based companies to invest in, and chose Tampa because of the ease of travel to major cities across the state. Current investments include Dixie Southern, a custom steel fabricator in Bradenton, Health Integrated, a medical care management company in Tampa and Ottlite, a lighting company in Tampa.

MobileHelp was a natural fit for the firm’s focus on companies that use technology to meet a need or improve a product. The personal response system, which enables someone to contact a call center in the event medical assistance is needed, has been around for a long time. What differentiates MobileHelp’s product is the wireless component, allowing people to take the device anywhere they go. The device also has a GPS component which allows for constant tracking of the individual, as well as fall detection technology.

"We’re seeing a lot of companies that are able to advance and progress much further with lower amounts of capital than they would have five or six years ago because of the use of technology," says Lux. "It’s exciting to be in the Tampa Bay area. We continue to see good growth opportunities here."

Stonehenge currently has $40 million in capital under management and is looking to expand that to $65 - $70 million within the next 4 – 5 years.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Steven Lux, Stonehenge Growth Equity Partners

USF's Patel College Hosts Internationally Acclaimed Climate Change Expert

USF students studying sustainability now have another resource to help understand the global impact of climate change and steps that can be taken to reduce the effects.  

The Patel College of Global Sustainability at the University of South Florida recently awarded Rajendra Pachauri, Ph.D. the Eminent Global Scholar in Sustainability Award. The newly created award was designed to recognize professionals who are doing significant work to advance the well-being of the wider global community.

"It reflects the interdisciplinary nature of the work we do at the Patel College," says Patel College Dean Kala Vairavamoorthy.

The College also hopes the award recipients will be an ambassador and adviser for them and support their research and education programs, which include a focus on sustainable communities and environments.

Pachauri is a 2007 Nobel Peace Prize recipient and Chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He visited USF recently and spoke with students about the Climate Change report recently released by the United Nations. His lecture, titled "Energy Scenarios and Climate Impacts," focused on the impact humans are having on the environment and the results of this impact such as shrinking polar caps, rising sea waters and higher concentrations of greenhouses gases. He also discussed projected risks of these changes such as slowed economic growth, new poverty traps in urban areas, food utilization issues and increase in disease.

His lecture wasn’t all doom and gloom though. He discussed the opportunities for change, which was inspiring for the students. Possible solutions include more rapid improvements in energy efficiency and more utilization of low-carbon energy supplies from renewable sources. The Patel College is working on some of these very issues.

"Having someone of his stature who is at all the meetings where [climate change] is discussed and debated, sharing where the planet is in terms of external pressures and impact of resource management -- for our students, it’s a really big deal," says Vairavamoorthy.

Pachauri also communicates the political dimensions and interests from other countries, helping students learn how different governments respond to this information and the nuances involved in trying to negotiate and operate as a global community in light of these uncertainties.

USF is looking to continue Pachauri’s involvement with a more formal partnership, leading to more visits and engagement with students.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Kala Vairavamoorthy., Patel College of Global Sustainability at USF

Tampa To Host National Small Business Entrepreneurship Conference In 2015

The U.S. Association of Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE) will host a major event in Tampa in 2015. The group's Annual Conference is expected to draw more than 500 attendees from around the United States and the world in the field of entrepreneurship education for a three-day symposium at the downtown Tampa Hilton.

The conference ("Sun, Fun & Innovation: Advancing Entrepreneurship Teaching and Research'') will draw "tremendous attendees,'' says Hillsborough County Economic Development Manager Stephanie Ashley.

"What's so exciting, when you think about the EDI2  program, is that our community wants to be a model for how the government helps drive ecosystems,'' says Ashley. "So what is this event going to do? This is going to put a national spotlight on Hillsborough County in supporting our entrepreneurial ecosystem.''

USASBE was awarded $25,000 from the county's Economic Development Innovation Initiative (EDI2) fund to help bring entrepreneurship educators to Tampa. The event's activities aim to highlight Hillsborough County as a place to launch entrepreneurial startups through workshops, panels featuring local high-profile speakers and recent graduates, and proposed visits to innovation hubs like Tampa Bay WaVE and CAMLS in downtown Tampa.

Amy Brownlee, an Assistant Professor of Management at the University of Tampa, is the current VP of Conferences for USASBE and is the primary event organizer. Rebecca White, Director of Entrepreneurship at the University of Tampa, previously served as president of USASBE. White will organize a consortium of local area universities for a "collaborative and synergistic approach'' in showcasing Hillsborough County to attendees.

Richard Gonzmart, president of Columbia Restaurant Group, will be the conference's keynote speaker for the event's welcome reception.

The United States Association of Small Business and Entrepreneurship Annual Conference will take place January 22-25, 2015 at the downtown Tampa Hilton, 211 N Tampa St.

USASBE will accept submissions for competitive papers from June 9, 2014 until August 31, 2014. Visit USASPE online for more information about attending, presenting, sponsoring, exhibiting, or volunteering at the conference.
 
Writer: Justine Benstead
Source: Stephanie Ashley, Hillsborough County Economic Development Manager

St. Joseph's Hospital-North Hosts Tampa's First Robotic-Assisted, Single-Site Hysterectomy

A physician at St. Joseph’s Hospital-North is the first in Tampa to perform a relatively new, innovative option for a hysterectomy.

Dr. Pamela Twitty, OBGYN at The Women’s Group, says she is happy to be the first physician in Tampa to perform a robotic-assisted single site-hysterectomy.  Hysterectomies are the second most common surgery performed in America on women and are often used to treat serious conditions such as endometriosis, excessive bleeding or fibroids.

In a traditional hysterectomy, a doctor makes a five- to seven-inch incision, leaving a noticeable scar and resulting in an average of one to two months or recovery time. The new procedure, called the da Vinci robotic-assisted single site surgery, makes a single, one inch incision. The results are less pain and scarring, a shortened hospital stay and quicker return to normal activities.

A unique feature of the robotic assistance is the control provided to the physician. The doctor can control the surgical instruments using a console in the operating room, eliminating the need to coordinate one or more assistants to help with instrumentation.  

Robotic-assisted surgery technology has been used for almost 10 years and started with general surgeons for gall bladder surgery. It has become an option for gynecological surgeries within the past two years. What’s innovative about the da Vinci procedure is the single incision, allowing for minimal scarring and a quicker recovery.

"I’ve been a big fan for as long as I’ve been in medicine of staying innovative and using safe and new technologies," says Dr. Twitty. "I’m truly thrilled that it’s an option we can offer now."

The procedure can be used for other gynecological surgeries such as on the fallopian tubes or ovaries. As advancements continue, it could expand to other areas of general medicine.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Dr. Pamela Twitty, The Woman's Group

Florida Music Students Win Scholarships For Piano Performances

Six young pianists from around Florida were awarded a total of $22,500 in scholarship and prize money in the 2014 Artist Series Concerts of Sarasota Competition for Piano. 

Ten pianists made it to the final stage of the three-round competition in late March, which was judged by Julian Martin of the Juliard School; Robert Sherman, an award-winning radio broadcaster, music critic and educator; and acclaimed Pianist Derek Han.

Three pianists from the Scholarship Level (ages 14-19) received a total of $7,500 in scholarships. Priscilla Navarro, 19, of Ft. Myers was awarded the first prize Lee & Jerry Ross Scholarship of $3,000. Second-place Prize Winner Alvin Xue, 15, of Wellington, received $2,500 in prize money; and Third-place Winner Tiffany Chen, 16, of West Palm Beach received $2,000. 

In the Performance Level (ages 20-25), Heqing Huang, 20, of Boca Raton was awarded the first place Virginia B. Toulmin Award, amounting to $6,000. Second-place Winner Emily Charlson, 23, Tallahassee, received $5,000, and Third-place Winner Dan Sato, 25, Miami, was awarded $4,000. 

Endowments from private donors and money raised by Friends of the Artist Series organization provide the scholarship funding for the Artist Series Competition. 

The Artist Series Concerts Competition was established by Artistic Director Lee Dougherty Ross in 2002. Under the guidance of Coordinator Joy McIntyre, Professor Emerita of Music at Boston University, the competition grew to the statewide level in 2007. Since 2007, McIntyre says the competition has run on a multi-disciplinary cycle that annually celebrates top pianists, string musicians and vocalists.

“I applaud the Artist Series and its known leaders, Lee Dougherty Ross and Executive Director John Fisher. They have done really marvelous things with it. …  They are investing money in the future of classical music by supporting these young musicians,” McIntyre says. 

McIntyre adds that the city of Sarasota itself provides a unique cultural environment that fosters young musicians and artists.

“It’s a cultural mecca, if you will, where all kinds of things are going on. People of all levels of appreciation, whether it’s orchestra or theatre or art; classical or jazz music -- or the circus, of course -- are active supporters of the arts. Sarasota is where it’s at in terms of lively cultural life.”

Writer: Jessi Smith
Source: Joy McIntyre, Artist Concert Series Competition Coordinator

Tampa Startup Helps U.S. Travelers Find Parking Across Nation

Transportation reservation services like Discount Park and Ride intend to streamline your travel experience, whether you’re heading out of town for a business trip or a vacation cruise.

The Tampa startup launched in March 2014 to offer travelers a tailored parking solution -- and is quickly picking up speed in the national transportation sector.

Discount Park and Ride already has 35 partners across major U.S. markets, including San Francisco, Atlanta, New York, Chicago, Boston, Miami, and, of course, Tampa.  

How does it work? DPR partners with local parking lots to help travelers search for a safe place to park their cars. Partner facilities offer shuttles services and guaranteed reservations in off-site locations.

Concerned about just where these “off-site” locations may be? Discount Park and Ride has thought of that. Browse each location in advance and compare with other parking options through an interactive map on the DPR website. Local parking partners in Tampa, for example, include Memorial Airport Parking and Embassy Suites Tampa Airport/Westshore.

Consumers can search the Discount Park and Ride website by filters like price, location, service offerings, and distance from the airport/seaport; reviews and detailed information like shuttle frequency and payment methods are also available.

“Our goal is to provide value for the consumer and a prime customer experience,” says Discount Park and Ride President and co-Founder Alex Miningham.

Miningham attended Florida State University and holds an MBA in Business. A serial entrepreneur, he co-founded software technology startup inDegree as well as Capital Parking, a former parking company in Tampa. The company quickly expanded from a valet parking business servicing local high-end restaurants into a surface lot management company with a focus on airport and seaport parking in Tampa.

In 2013, HEPdata Inc. acquired inDegree. Shortly after, Miningham left his role at Capital Parking to found Discount Park and Ride.

 DPR plans to spread out into other sectors of parking, from special events at sports and concert venues to off-street and garage parking in large metropolitan areas of the country.

Miningham cites problems in the parking industry between “brick-and-mortar facilities and third-party reservation companies” as part of the inspiration for founding Discount Park and Ride. DPR aims to eliminate some of the industry’s problems by offering parking partners a host of tools to manage and modify data, from listings to pricing to sales reports.

So far, feedback from industry partners has been positive. In fact, Discount Park and Ride is expanding much more rapidly than originally anticipated, says Miningham, with partners in major markets nationwide after only one month of operation. 

Discount Park and Ride isn’t the first company to offer parking and shuttle service to and from facilities like airports; Park N’ Fly  also operates in the Tampa Bay area. The difference, according to Miningham, is scale. 

“Park N’ Fly is a nationally branded parking company with brick-and-mortar locations nationwide who have struck partnerships on a very small scale with strategic partners in certain markets. DPR, on the other hand, doesn’t operate any brick and mortar facilities; rather, we strike partnerships with facilities across the nation on a much larger scale,” Miningham explains. 

Discount Park and Ride currently employs 15 people in the Tampa Bay region. The company, which raised over $1 million in a seed round of financing through a private equity firm, is currently closing in on its second round of funding.

“We’re excited to continue our expansion with a focus on innovation along the way,” Miningham says. “Our ultimate goal is to be the go-to reservation company for consumers when they’re looking to reserve parking across any sector.”

Writer: Justine Benstead
Source: Alex Miningham, Discount Park and Ride

Stay Smart Solutions Launches Accessibility Pilot Project In Tampa

An Ohio-based company is running a test pilot project in Tampa to help medical providers offer a safer environment for clients and help people with diabilities caused by aging or medical conditions to more easily navigate their own homes.

Stay Smart Solutions has a three-step approach to construction and renovation modifications: assess, recommend, modify. First, they work with patients and healthcare providers to perform a comprehensive environment assessment. Next, an Occupational Therapist recommends modifications that make the most sense for the individual. Finally, a modification team installs the products.

The innovative approach is designed to make transitiions in living more successful, ultimately improving safety for patients and group home residents, while allowing individuals to remain in their own homes when possible.

"It’s not just about installing things. It’s about looking at it clinically from the inside and out to see if it’s the best thing for the customer," says Nina Corsi, director of market development for Stay Smart.

Stay Smart Solutions recognized the need after observing that many modifications to homes and businesses don't fit those challenged by accessibility issues. Simply installing items like grab bars doesn't help without first getting guidance to make sure the placement works properly for the person or people served.

The company began in 2013 with the pilot project taking place now in Tampa through building contractors and DIY stores.  

One of the company’s first clients was a gentleman who had a stroke and was returning home after several months of rehab. His wife purchased a grab bar for the shower and was planning to place it on the right side. Stay Smart’s Occupational Therapist visited the home to see how the patient was functioning. During her visit, she asked how he gets in and out of the tub. Noticing that he leans to the left, she recommended the bar go on that side. She then watched him walk down the hallway and noticed he was leaning to the right. To assist with this, custom bars were installed in the hallway that match the design of the house. 

If the initial pilot is successful, the company plans to expand to Orlando and eventually cover the State of Florida.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Nina Corsi, Stay Smart Solutions
927 Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts