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Florida Hospital Carrollwood Honored For Sustainability

Florida Hospital Carrollwood was recently recognized for its efforts to decrease consumption of fuel, water and energy.

The Hospital received the Green Business Designation from The Sustany Foundation and the City of Tampa. The program recognizes efforts of Tampa-based businesses in energy and natural gas consumption, water consumption, fuel consumption, solid waste and recycling.

Through its green initiative, launched in 2011, the Hospital has been able to save 2.4 million kilowatts of energy and 583,307 gallons of water, among other savings. Specific efforts include replacing incandescent light bulbs with more energy efficient options and purchasing only ENERGY STAR products. A partnership with Stericycle allowed them to identify recycling opportunities, leading to 30,683 lbs of recycling. They also implemented employee-focused programs such as recycling education, designated parking spaces for fuel efficient vehicles and a Green Team to help review their progress and develop new ideas.

"We believe strongly that we’re here to benefit the community," says Florida Hospital CEO Joe Johnson. "We want to do whatever we can to minimize the impact to our landfills and our environment."

The Green Business Designation process involves businesses completing a set of specific metrics including materials recycled, percent of employees that carpool, ongoing hours of energy and water conservation and training and business-generated metrics.

The Hospital responded to a recent challenge by Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn and is the only hospital to receive the designation thus far. The challenge was first identified by a hospital employee who championed it internally. "I knew it was a challenge we needed to accept," says Johnson.
 
Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Joe Johnson, Florida Hospital Carrollwood

Aqua Mizer Launches New Water-Saving Technology

A Sarasota-based company is launching a product that will significantly decrease residential water use.

Aqua Mizer's flagship product, the Adjustable Flush System, is a retrofit toilet tank flush system that replaces components inside a residential toilet tank to reduce leaking. A major feature is a flapper that allows the toilet to be flushed with more velocity and less water, saving a quarter to a gallon of water with each flush. The system was first patented and brought to market in 2010, when the current owners took over an invention originally created in 2008.

The company estimates that if a toilet is leaking, installing the system will save 75,000 to 200,000 gallons of water per year. The average return on investment is three to six months.

"If just leaky toilets in Florida were replaced, it would reduce consumption by 275 billion gallons of water per year," says Michael Sisti, VP of Sales and Marketing for Aqua Mizer.

Aqua Mizer is currently rolling out a new product that does everything the current flush system does, with an added feature. In the event of a catastrophic leak where water starts running full force, it shuts off the toilet within 30 seconds.
The company recently launched a campaign on Indiegogo to help fund the product’s launch. The campaign will allow the public to acquire the product, which is not normally available in retail establishments.

The company plans to sell The Protector through wholesale distribution channels, primarily to property managers and plumbing contractors.

The Rivo at Ringling, a high-rise condo in downtown Sarasota, recently installed the Aqua Mizer system in all toilets in the 106 building unit (235 in all). The first month’s water bill following installation showed a reduction of close to 110,000 gallons of water compare with the same month the previous year.

The Protector was recently submitted to an innovation contest through the Cade Museum for Innovation in Gainesville, FL and was selected in the final 16 semi-finalists for a potential $50,000 prize.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Michael Sisti, Aqua Mizer

New South Biolabs Plants In Bradenton, 52 New Jobs

New South Biolabs has established a new sales and distribution center in Bradenton to market and sell environmentally safe ZeroMold anti-microbial products made by Biosenta, Inc. The development will create 52 new logistics, marketing and sales jobs over the next five years with average salaries at 50 percent higher than the local average area wage of $35,633.

The successful establishment of New South’s distribution center in South Manatee County is a result of the Bradenton Area Economic Development Council’s global economic development initiatives and long-term commitment to business collaboration.

"Two years in the making, this is the first international project directly resulting from the EDC’s outreach initiative that began in 2011 through a grant provided by Manatee County Government. Our initial conversations in Toronto with New South Biolab’s president placed the Bradenton area on the company’s radar as it was identifying a location for marketing Biosenta products," says Sharon Hillstrom, president and CEO of the Bradenton Area EDC.

New South is a newly formed company that recently entered a distribution agreement with Canadian firm Biosentia to market, sell, and distribute a new line of anti-microbal products from the ZeroMold brand. The products will be targeted to and sold in the Southern US, Caribbean Basin and South America.

Manatee Board of County Commissioners
approved New South to receive up to $104,000 in performance-based incentives for the new jobs that it will create.

New South’s distribution center additionally qualified for Manatee County’s rapid response permitting program which streamlines and expedites the process of obtaining the necessary permitting to bring the full project and facility to market.

"The Bradenton area offered a number of attributes that attracted us. We need a warm climate to help protect the product from damage; the cost of doing business was attractive; and we value proximity to Port Manatee for future distribution," says New South President Bill Connor.

The company's new facility features 15,000 square feet of operational space and the addition of a full science lab at the Parkland Center in South Manatee County.

New South’s 2014 focus includes hiring and training new staff, regulatory approvals, and logistics management.

Biosenta is also sourcing local companies to produce the liquid product nearby.

Visit the Bradenton Area EDC's website for more information.

Writer: Kaye Brown
Sources: Bill Connor, New South Biolabs; Sharon Hillstrom, Bradenton Area EDC

BLUE Ocean Film Festival Casts Wide Net For Talent, Technology

The international BLUE Ocean Film Festival & Conservation Summit, which arrives in the Tampa Bay region for the first time in November 2014, has announced an open call for film submissions. Entries will be accepted through April 28. The early bird deadline is Feb. 28.
 
The week-long festival and summit will be a magnet for filmmakers from around the globe, including emerging talent and amateurs. 
 
Based on previous responses, BLUE Ocean organizers expect to receive 350-370 original submissions. Debbie Kinder, the festival's co-founder and CEO, anticipates an ecosystem of independent entries based on the innovative technologies now widely available.
 
"Cameras like the GoPro are a technology disrupter; they are really changing the way filmmaking's done,'' says Kinder. "I think what we're seeing is a trend of more up-and-coming filmmakers and students that have the ability to get up and tell good stories as technology becomes more affordable.''

These emerging technologies tend to attract young filmmakers. In the past, "we had student films from filmmakers as young as 5th grade,'' says Kinder. The festival will host a separate category for Tampa Bay K-12 students. All students will receive special recognition for participating.
 
The platform of the festival, and the available technologies, make it possible to promote conservation through storytelling. The forward-thinking event will use films, such as Blackfish, to bring up complicated questions, but the dialogue will be focused on finding solutions and encouraging progress.

"We discuss issues, but we also want to highlight success stories. There are great success stories and those need to be heard more,'' says Kinder.
 
In addition to the submissions and summit discussions, the festival has become a hotbed for high-tech unveilings. At the last festival, Google launched its Oceans Street View and the 360-degree underwater camera that would start their work capturing images of Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Google has confirmed another product launch for the upcoming festival.

"A lot of people come together at BLUE. There's still a lot of great technology that comes out to the festival in general; whether it's about filmmaking or just communications as a whole,'' says Kinder.
 
The BLUE Ocean Film Festival & Conservation Summit will take place Nov. 3rd through 9th. BLUE will be headquartered in St. Petersburg at the downtown Hilton, with events taking place at venues in St. Petersburg, Tampa and Sarasota. For more information on submitting your film, visit the festival's 2014 film competiion page.

Writer: Ash Withers
Source: Debbie Kinder, BLUE Ocean Film Festival & Conservation Summit

James Hardie Invests $80 Million, 100 New Jobs in Plant City

James Hardie, global manufacturer of fiber cement siding and interior products, is making an $80 million capital investment in eastern Hillsborough County, expanding its Plant City operations and creating 100 new manufacturing, engineering, project management, and administration jobs by 2015.

"This is an exciting time for James Hardie in both Plant City and around the world. Innovation that happens in Plant City resonates around the world, and the catalyst is the great environment we have here. Employees see themselves as a family, and that says a lot about the people in the city and the surrounding community," says Ryan Sullivan, south division general manager for James Hardie.

James Hardie's expansion plan includes 100,000 square-feet of additional manufacturing space, new machinery, and new equipment, essentially doubling production capacity to meet the increased industry demand for its fiber cement siding products.

The company first established operations in Plant City site in 1994, which currently employs 100 associates.

In 2012, in an effort to increase the community’s competitive advantage in high-impact economic development projects, the City of Plant City approved a moratorium on the collection of transportation mobility fees.

Resultantly, James Hardie received a fee waiver of $37,300, further solidifying market productivity, regional economic growth, and job creation for Tampa Bay.

"This is great news for our community. Manufacturing is an important part of our economic growth strategy," says Mark Sharpe, chairman of the Hillsborough County Board of County Commissioners.

The company is also eligible for Florida’s new Machinery and Equipment Sales Tax Exemption program, which was approved by the state legislature in May 2013.

"James Hardie has been a valuable member of our business community for more than two decades. Its decision to expand in Plant City is a testament to the strong business environment we’ve created, and validates our role as a top manufacturing and distribution center," says Plant City Mayor Mary Thomas Mathis.

For more information on career opportunities, visit James Hardie online.

Writer: Kaye Brown
Sources: Ryan Sullivan, James Hardie; Mark Sharpe, Hillsborough County BOCC; Mary Thomas Mathis, City of Plant City

Angelo's Invests $50 Million in Florida, 120+ Jobs In Pinellas

A national pioneer in recycled building materials, Angelo’s Recycled Materials, is expanding rapidly, recently selecting St. Petersburg, as its national headquarters and creating more than 120 new green jobs by the end December 2013.

Angelo’s, which has already created more than 100 jobs locally in 2013, recently added a new container division for construction and demolition job sites and currently operates six active recycling facilities.

As Angelo’s continues to expand through the addition of new recycling operations centers, the company also plans to add more than 200 jobs over the next few years.

"The company saw a real need for this kind of business in St. Petersburg. The entire area and the building has been repurposed to make the property more attractive. It is the perfect place to invest their future," says Mario Farias, public relations manager.

Founded by Angelo Iafrate in 1960, the company originally recycled reclaimed concrete into aggregate and road-base products. Realizing the opportunity to reuse many of the materials that were originally discarded during the demolition process, Angelo & his brother designed a machine to crush the concrete while extracting metals, sand, wood, plastics and other particles in order to avoid unnecessary landfilling and reduce costs on construction projects as they reuse materials.

In addition to the 13-acre site at its new St. Petersburg headquarters, the firm has invested more than $13 million in Pinellas County and over $50 million in the state of Florida, and is committed to continuing its investment in the Tampa Bay region.

"We are committed to investing in the greater St. Petersburg area and all of Florida by building upon our existing locations and developing new locations," says Angelo’s Principal Dominic Iafrate, Jr.

Angelo's recycling rate is over 80 percent in its St. Petersburg and Largo materials processing facilities, which is critical to helping city, county, and commercial clients reach the state's 75 percent recycling goal

The company is also in the permitting process to add four additional yards in Florida in 2014: one in Brandon, one in Tampa, and two in Orlando.

For more information on career opportunities, visit Angelo’s online.

Writer: Kaye Brown
Source: Dominic Iafrate and Mario Farias, Angelo's

TEDxYouth@TampaBay Celebrates Local Youth

What do a conservationist, a scientist and the youngest solo hiker on the Appalachian Trail have in common? They’re all Tampa Bay residents under the age of 18. They’re also all speakers at TEDxYouth@TampaBay.

The fourth annual event, November 16 at the John F. Germany Library in Tampa, brings the community together to celebrate the unsung heroes among Tampa Bay youth. The 18-minute "TED talks" are modeled after the larger TED organization, which originally stood for technology, entertainment and design but now includes any topic that is encouraging and inspiring.

This year's event is being held in conjunction with over 70 events across the globe during the weekend-long TEDxYouthDay

"We have a fantastic slate of presenters who are inspired by something and then go out and act on it," says Terri Willingham, the event’s organizer. "They’re not just thinkers, they’re doers."

The theme is "Spark of Inspiration." The six presenters, all from Tampa Bay, plan to exemplify the theme, each in their own way. For example:
  • 15-year old Neva “chipmunk” Warren is the youngest person to do a solo 1,700 mile hike on the Appalachian Trail. Her focus is encouraging people to move away from body image issues and focus on what your body can do.
  • Carrie Boucher takes art on the road to serve youth through the NOMADStudio (Neighborhood-Oriented Mobile Art & Design Studio) and the belief that art is for everyone.
  • James Geiger, a recent Masters’ degree graduate from the University of South Florida, is a multidimensional artist. Complications at birth left him with Cerebral Palsy, but that hasn’t slowed him down or stifled his ability to inspire and encourage others. His message is that there aren’t any disabilities. It’s all about what you can do with what you’re given.
  • At the age of 12, Avalon Theisen is this year's youngest presenter. When she was nine, she founded a nonprofit, Conserve It Forward, which promotes environmental awareness and action, especially among youth.
"We don’t always take a lot of time to listen to one another," says Willingham. "This is an opportunity for these young people to be heard, and for us to listen. It gives me reassurance and hope for the future."

The event is sold out, but can be viewed via live stream.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Terri Willingham, Learning is for Everyone

Sarasota Company Designs Innovative, Customizable Electric Scooter

A new plug and play transportation vehicle will soon be on the market that adds convenience to city life.

The Vectrix VT-1, ‘tall wheel’ e-scooter includes interchangeable lithium batteries that can be removed from the vehicle and plugged directly into a standard electric outlet. What’s different and innovative about the design is its ease of use. To charge the battery, simply lift up the seat, remove the battery cover and pull the batteries out. This is particularly attractive to city dwellers who are not able to charge an entire vehicle through the night because of lack of a carport or garage.

It also has an option for removing the back for expanded storage, and an LCD command screen with animated digital communications. Another innovative feature is the fact that it transforms into a fleet vehicle if needed, giving it the nickname "the transformer" among designers.

The scooter was designed by ROBRADY, a product design and development firm headquartered in Sarasota. The manufacturing and engineering was done by partner company, Vectrix.

ROBRADY has been designing scooters with Vectrix for years, but this is the first time all of these components have come together in one product.

"This one is a watershed moment for us," comments Rob Brady, CEO and Design Director for ROBRADY. "It has been exciting and dynamic to try to figure out how everything works in such a clean, tight electric vehicle."

All in all, the design took 18 months and was done with the use of clay modeling, prototypes and a lot of testing.
The scooter has a range of 55 miles on a full charge and can reach a speed of 62 miles per hour.  

The product was unveiled in early November in Milan, Italy and will be available in the United States in 2014.

ROBRADY has been in Sarasota for over 20 years and has five buildings, with just under 50 employees.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Rob Brady, ROBRADY

Sun Boxes Emit Music, Light For Art Center Sarasota

From the concrete rooftop of the downtown Palm Avenue parking garage to the sandy shores of Siesta and Lido Key beaches, Sarasota is humming with “good vibrations’’ this week, as the melodious, portable “Sun Box’’ sound installations created by artist and musician, Craig Colorusso, travel around the city, launching Art Center Sarasota’s 2013-2014 season.

Presented in collaboration by Art Center Sarasota and the City of Sarasota, Arkansas-based Colorusso’s Sun Boxes make their first tour of the city this week, from November 4-7, and will return on January 1-3, 2014 to appear at city parks and beaches.

The portable outdoor installation is comprised of 20 solar-powered wooden speaker boxes that emit different sounds, each composed on guitar and recorded with looping pedals by Colorusso. When exposed to sunlight, the Sun Boxes produce a melodious hum. Some people simply lay down and linger in the boxes’ meditative drone, while others prefer to interact with the symphony by moving around and in front of the solar panels to adjust the hum.

“Sometimes When I do a gig somewhere and I have a really long drive, I can still hear the sounds for a few days rumbling underneath my thoughts,”  Colorusso says.

“I’ve been hearing the sounds of the Sun Boxes all my life, and for a long time, I didn’t know what to to with them. I think they sound familiar, and yet I never grow tired of hearing them,“ he adds.

Colorusso says he created the first Sun Boxes in 2009, in response to a call for art that incorporates sustainability at the Goldwell Open Air Museum in Nevada.

The Sun Boxes are an outgrowth of Colorusso’s “CUBEMUSIC,” an electric-powered installation of six aluminum cubes that emanate light and musical tones. “CUBEMUSIC” will be on display through January 3 at Art Center Sarasota.

“As a musician, I was always so envious of my friends who were painters and sculptors because they would make these amazing objects. Music doesn’t really exist as an ‘object.’ Our ears are interpreting vibrations in the air. I make environments,” Colorusso says.

The Sun Box tour schedule for November 4-7, 2013 and January 1-3, 2014 is available here.

Writer: Jessi Smith
Sources: Craig Colorusso; Emma Thurgood, Art Center Sarasota

USF Energy Conference Designed To Be Conduit For Collaboration

A conference aimed at bringing together students, researchers, businesses and other members of the Tampa Bay community to network and exchange ideas on sustainable energy will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14, in the University of South Florida's Marshall Center.

"IDEA: InterDisciplinary Exchange in Action'' is the name of both the conference and the student group organizing the event. A diverse mix of topics will be presented in the day-long conference, ranging from the emergence of "green'' computer networks to geothermal technology, energy-saving techniques for waste minimization, and the future of global sustainable societies.

"Our goal is to create an annual conference where ideas from different disciplines can be shared and eventually lead to collaborations,'' says Eleanor Clements, a PhD student in chemistry and president of the newly formed IDEA group. "We chose sustainable energy as the first topic and have had a great response from academics at the University who want to share their research.''

In addition to a full slate of speakers, the event will feature a trade show for local businesses, organizations and entrepreneurs involved in sustainable energy, Clements adds.
 
Conference speakers include:
  • Dr. George Philippidis, Patel College Associate Professor of Sustainable Energy, will discuss his research in biomass and algae technologies for sustainable production of transportation fuels and  renewable power. As director of the Renewable Fuels Laboratory, Philippidis has engineered technologies to grow fuel-producing algae while reducing water and energy consumption.
  • Kenneth Christensen, a professor in USF's Department of Computer Science and Engineering, will be discussing his research on energy efficiency of computer networks or "green networks.''
  • Professor James Stock will speak about environmental and energy implications of "reverse logistics'' and the energy required for product returns, including remanufacturing, repairing, and refurbishing of products, packaging reuse, recycling, minimization and substitution.
  • Dr. E. Christian Wells, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Founding Director of the USF Office of Sustainability, will share his global perspective on  environmental economic decision making, sustainability science and social issues such as the global culture of environmentalism and sustainable societies of the future.
  • Allan Feldman, Professor of Science Education, will discuss his research on the role that K-12 teachers and students can have in scientific and engineering research projects, particularly in fields related to sustainability.
  • Cheryl Hall, Associate Professor of Government and International Affairs, will look at the ways in which different understandings of freedom, happiness and sacrifice influence our imagination of the possibilities for creating environmentally sustainable societies.
  • Michael J. Lynch,  Professor of Criminology,  will address environmental justice in the United States, the distribution of hazardous waste sites and chemical accidents, global warming, environmental law and regulation, and  environmental crimes.
  • Friedemann Buschbeck, Green Party liaison to Germany, will speak on his recent visit and how the German government encourages green innovation.
  • Ashleigh Stewart of Young of Americans for Liberty will discuss free markets in relation to energy innovation.
  • Jay Egg of EggGeoThermal will discuss geothermal technologies  and  his recently published article in National Geographic on the same topic.
The conference is open to the public and will be held in the Royal Palm Ballroom in the Marshall Center. Admission is free; sponsors and exhibitors may follow this link for more information.

Writer: Marcia Biggs
Source: Eleanor Clements, IDEA

Zip Around Town In An Electric Vehicle On Plug In Day

Have you seen or heard about plug-in vehicles but don’t know much about them? Plug In Day will give you an opportunity to learn more and take a test drive to see what the buzz is about.

Plug in Day is a nationwide celebration of cars, trucks and motorcycles that are fueled by electricity (storing all of their energy in batteries) or plug-in hybrids (using batteries as well as a gas engine). Plug in vehicles are less expensive to fuel and maintain, as well as better for the environment compared with those that use only gasoline.

Events will take place at 88 locations across the U.S., with two in the Tampa Bay region: September 28 in Temple Terrace and September 29 in Sarasota. At the national level, events are coordinated by Plug In America, Sierra Club and Electric Auto Association, with activities being coordinated by local partners.  

"Together these events really aim to draw attention to the environmental and economic benefits of the electric vehicle," says Britten Cleveland, conservation organizer for the Sierra Club in Tampa Bay.

The highlight of both events will be ride and drives, encouraging people to bring in their plug in vehicles for others to test drive, and see for themselves how beneficial the cars can be.

Plug in vehicles have a measurable reduction on oil use and air population, providing positive implications for health and the environment.

"It’s all about reducing our dependence on oil and reducing emissions from tail pipes," says Cleveland.

With the theme “Electrify the Island,” the Sarasota event will also feature a sustainability expo, food vendors and music.

The Temple Terrace event will feature green technology organizations, solar companies and other like-minded organizations.

Event partners include Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium, the City of Sarasota, Sarasota County, Tampa Bay Clean Cities Coalition and USF Patel College of Global Sustainability.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Britten Cleveland, Sierra Club

Tampa Convention Center Increases Green Efforts, Saves Money

The Tampa Convention Center (TCC) recently joined over 15,000 organizations (49 in Tampa) to become an ENERGY STAR PARTNER, a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy that encourages companies to use energy efficient practices. Among other things, the partnership encourages companies to improve their energy efficiency by 10 percent or more.
 
"Our facility decided that we wanted to do a better job of being a good partner, not only in the community but also to the environment," says Eric Blanc, director of sales, marketing and convention services for TCC.

During the last year, TCC staff looked at ways to make the 23-year old building more efficient. They started by moving from a standard method of observing energy usage after the fact to a new system that allows them to monitor the electricity used on a real time basis. This allowed internal programs and controls to be put in place to help control electrical usage, such as only running air conditioning in areas that are occupied and decreasing use of escalators when they are not being used. Overall, these efforts led to a 10% decrease in electrical costs over the last six months.

TCC also has an agreement with TECO that allows them to buy back electricity during peak periods, diverting power they would be using to other areas of demand. Additionally, they underwent a $1 million project to retrofit the lighting system in the exhibit hall, using a federal grant to replace outdated lighting with high efficiency LEDs.

They are also active in recycling, going beyond the traditional plastic, paper and aluminum. For example, shows that use building products donate leftover supplies to local charities such as Habitat for Humanity. They also donate extra convention supplies such as pens, tote bags and books to Teaching Tools for Hillsborough Schools, which provides these supplies to public school teachers for use in the classroom.

The ENERGY STAR partnership is one step in TCC’s long-term efforts to become a LEAD certified facility.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Eric Blanc, Tampa Convention Center

Clearwater To Build 2nd Reverse Osmosis Water Plant

The City of Clearwater's sustainability initiatives continue as they break ground on the second reverse osmosis (RO) water treatment plant.
 
The plant, located on U.S. Highway 19 N., will use state-of-the-art technology to treat up to 6.25 million gallons of brackish (or slightly salty) water, turning it into clean drinking water for city residents.
 
Reverse osmosis, also known as hyperfiltration, is a water purification process that is used by major bottled water companies. It reduces the salts, minerals, ions and other impurities, leaving high quality drinking water. The brackish water would not be drinkable without the RO process and doesn’t have alternative uses.
 
The $34 million project is being funded cooperatively by the Southwest Florida Water Management District and has created new jobs for contractors, electrical engineers, plumbers and construction workers.
 
The plant is part of the city's integrative water management strategy, which includes five tactical areas: in-home water conversation including the use of reclaimed water; preservation of drinking water resources; protecting the coastal environment by decreasing discharge to local bodies of water; producing more locally; and cost management.

"Everything we do in public utilities is to try to be sustainable as possible, and to responsibly use the water resources we have," says Nan Bennett, assistant director or public utilities for the City of Clearwater.
 
In an innovative move, the city is taking the concentrate, a salty by-product produced by its existing RO plant and treating it again in the second plant, allowing less water to be withdrawn from the ground supply. Another project currently in the pilot phase involves ground water replenishment, or taking leftover reclaimed water, treating it through the RO process and injecting it back into the aquifer. This creates a complete water cycle, naturally balancing the water supply.

Construction will begin in June, with estimated completion in December 2014.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Nan Bennett, Tracy Mercer, City of Clearwater

The Green Can Collects Recyclables At Tampa Bay Apartments

A Tampa-based company has found an economically viable way to help the environment.

The Green Can places large green recycling containers in the shape of a soda can in apartment complexes and other high traffic areas. Described as "the perfect marriage of economic and social responsibility," the cans have a triple benefit: they make it easy for people to recycle, they support charities through the donation of proceeds from recycling, and they benefit local businesses through advertising.

The idea came about when CEO and Founder Dennis Gallagher was working as a painter for apartment complexes. He noticed that none of them did any recycling, which he found odd. After crunching the numbers he realized the reason was probably economical, since the proceeds from recycling would only pay for the process itself. It was then that he came up with the idea of adding advertising to the process, to make the business profitable.

"To sweeten the deal, we donate the proceeds from the recycling, so everyone can benefit," says Gallagher.

There are currently around 200 cans at 130 locations in the Greater Tampa area. The company is expanding into Pinellas this week with the same of its first franchise to Boley Centers, a nonprofit that services the homeless, youth and those with mental disabilities in the Tampa Bay region.

Gallagher recently designed a cap for the containers to keep the water out and plans to start collecting clothing donations soon.

Close to one million cans have been recycled in roughly a year’s time, with an estimate of 4,000 pounds of aluminum and plastic being recycled each month.

The Green Can is one of 13 local businesses honored recently with The University of Tampa’s Earth Charter Sustainable Business Awards.The awards were based on three criteria: people (employee and community wellbeing), planet (environmental health) and profit (economic viability).

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Dennis Gallagher, The Green Can

LumaStream Makes Big Plans For Lighting

LumaStream offers a turnkey, innovative lighting infrastructure that is not only cost effective but energy efficient and highly controllable.

"We don’t have small plans. We intend to change the world of lighting," comments LumaStream's CEO and Founder Eric Higgs.
 
A high-tech entrepreneur with ties to Silicon Valley, Higgs discovered the product while searching for lighting solutions for the exterior of the parking garage at the Element building in downtown Tampa. He wasn't happy with the cost and quality of available LED products. Teaming up with an electrical contractor, he saw an opportunity. The team learned about a company in Canada that had created the core technology now being used by LumaStream. They bought the company, developed the product and patented the digital power conversion technology.
 
The product converts high voltage lighting to low voltage digitally and then sends it long distances in a highly controlled way. The result is a longer lasting lighting system that is also more efficient and has a higher quality output. Described as an "intelligent power center," the system is also unique because of its control center, which includes a wireless interface that can be used through a smartphone or other mobile device or a push-button wall station.
 
Also a sculptor, Higgs is no stranger to large visual displays, with his artwork being found in major public installations and museums around the world. He credits his fine arts background with helping him create the design for the fixtures.

LumaStream's lighting systems can be found in venues across Tampa Bay including Tech Data, Tropicana Field and the Museum of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg.

The company plans to stay in Tampa Bay and is moving its power supply manufacturing from Canada.

"What I like about this area is that it’s one of the top technology hubs of anywhere in the country. The passion, with the incubators and accelerators, and the momentum and desire to support new ventures is absolutely amazing," says Higgs.

LumaStream is one of 13 local businesses honored recently with The University of Tampa’s Earth Charter Sustainable Business Awards. The awards were based on three criteria: people (employee and community well-being), planet (environmental health) and profit (economic viability).

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Eric Higgs, LumaStream
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