All Children's Research To Focus On Community, Plans To Add 300+ Jobs

A new education and research center and grassroots community programming will address current and long term health needs of children in St. Petersburg and beyond.

All Children’s Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine recently purchased land adjacent to its current building in downtown St. Petersburg to expand its research and training facilities. The primary focus of the new center will be in neurosciences, cancer and cardiac research and disease. The facility will support an expanded residency and medical student program, as well as training for nurses and other allied health professionals.

"The facility will attract and support a number of PhD and Masters-level researchers, physicians and clinical scientists that will contribute to our vision to be able to cure and better treat disease, particularly for chronic populations," says Bill Horton, senior VP of strategic business services for All Children’s Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine.

The property was purchased from the University of South Florida (USF), which was a natural fit given the existing relationship the hospital has with the USF Children’s Research Institute, where scientists from both organizations collaborate.

The center will also strengthen the medical research corridor that is developing in St. Petersburg including USF, USF St. Petersburg, Bayfront Health Systems, Florida Blue’s Healthbox Accelerator Program and entrepreneurial incubator biotech firms developing in the Tampa Bay area.

"There’s a thriving academic research environment in this corridor," says Horton. "It’s a tremendous synergy that feeds and supports one another in the cross-development of this scientific work."

An estimated 300 to 400 new jobs will be created in as a result of the expansion. The development for the new property will be funded through philanthropy and grants. The facility is expected to open in 2018 or 2019.
   
The hospital is also working with the community at large to address critical issues in the short-term, such as infant mortality and childhood obesity. Grassroots education programs and interventions are being developed in collaboration with the City of St. Petersburg, in addition to changes in public policy to improve the overall health of the community.

Writer: Megan Hendricks
Source: Bill Horton, All Children's Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine

Read more articles by Megan Hendricks.

Megan Hendricks is a feature writer at 83 Degrees Media in the Tampa Bay region of Florida.
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